Toy Story 2

Not rated yet!
Director
John Lasseter
Runtime
1 h 32 min
Release Date
30 October 1999
Genres
Animation, Comedy, Family
Overview
Andy heads off to Cowboy Camp, leaving his toys to their own devices. Things shift into high gear when an obsessive toy collector named Al McWhiggen, owner of Al's Toy Barn kidnaps Woody. Andy's toys mount a daring rescue mission, Buzz Lightyear meets his match and Woody has to decide where he and his heart truly belong.
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Conservative Film Buff3
Letterboxd



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)
  • Toy Story 2

    ★★★ Added

    Toy Story 2 introduces an interesting idea into the Toyverse: which is the more valuable toy—a collectors' item, or a child's plaything?

    One can feel that the topic is personal to director John Lasseter, who always did have something of an auteur streak in him. Lasseter is a toy collector who, as he explains in the Blu-ray special features, was always struggling to keep his five sons away from his pristine collection. You can sense him making fun of himself… more

    2 likes

    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Toy Story 4, 2019 - ★★★
    (”Toy Story 2” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    Entertaining and beautiful to look at, Toy Story 4 doesn’t exactly break new ground, but it does provide a fun night at the movies. The animation is the most praiseworthy element of the film. They’ve obviously been tweaking their water and lighting software, and they show it off here in bounds—from the first scene, we see some of the best looking rain effects ever, and a stunning new dark aesthetic that focuses on black skies contrasted with orange electric light that gorgeously and softly reflects off surfaces, with the addition of a wonderful bokeh effect in the background.

    In addition to the beautiful animation, the film itself is fun, but I don’t know what to think of its message or plot when I reflect on them.

    There’s a new character, Forky, that is a big hit (in addition to lending the film much of its depth. His character’s mere existence invites some reflection). The idea behind Forky is this: that he’s made out of a plastic spork and other random trash, and is therefore inherently worthless; the worth he has as a character comes from being loved. This concept should sound familiar: it’s basically the defining philosophy of our time.

    And like our Twitter generation, he loves trash!

    The core characters from the previous three films are present, but other than Woody they aren’t given much to do other than to be background decoration. And let’s talk about Woody—no character has been done more disservice over the course of these films than Woody. His arc from the original film has been muddled up since Toy Story 2, which forgot about Woody’s defining characteristic, loyalty, by making him agree to abandon his owner Andy. If it weren’t for the other toys saving him, all indications were that he would have done it. The Woody from Toy Story 3 had his loyalty back, but nothing to do with it. The filmmakers chose to make the movie about a college-age Andy, and in doing so lessened the believability of a genuine emotional relationship between Andy and Woody. Now Woody has gone through years of confusion, and that seems to be his defining characteristic. He’s basically an obsessive neurotic. Woody has become Woody Allen.

    Riddled with doubt and existential crisis, Woody’s neuroticism leads him to go back and forth. Does Bonnie still love him? What does he do without Bonnie’s love? What’s his purpose at this point? In his confusion, he latches onto the love Bonnie has for Forky and finds new purpose in him. When Bonnie and her family go on a road trip, Woody’s new job is to protect Forky from his true desire, which is to leave the toys and jump into a trash can, where he feels he belongs.

    When Woody and Forky eventually get separated from the rest of the pack, much like Woody’s and Buzz Lightyear’s story from the first film, Woody’s job is to get them back to the next town where Bonnie’s family is staying the night. When they arrive, Woody sees something in an antique shop that makes him think his old flame, Bo Peep, is in this town.

    Woody eventually finds Bo Peep, except now she is living the empowered life sans owner. Far from “lost,” which is what Woody considered toys without owners, she is free, happy, and cool. She changed her dress into a cape (what a symbol of feminine empowerment! I can see the Slate articles now!), and zooms around in a toy car disguised as a skunk, so she can even roam freely among humans.

    Bo, who is now an entirely different character from the first movie, represents a different kind of Forky—her worth still comes from being loved by a child, but she chooses the love. She decides which kid plays with her. Woody watches her with interest, but is still determined to fulfill his duty to Bonnie by returning to her with Forky.

    Meanwhile, in the antique shop, Woody has problems with a doll named Gabby Gabby. When she sees that Woody has a functioning voicebox that is the same model as her broken one, she kidnaps Forky to get to him. She hopes that a functioning voicebox will attract kids to her, and she will finally be loved. In other words, she places all her worth in whether she is the way she thinks others want her to be. The rest of the plot follows Woody’s own internal vacillation—back and forth between the characters, and their defining lifestyles: to Forky and Gabby Gabby to fulfill his duty, or to Bo Peep to follow his passions.

    This sets up an interesting choice for Woody, who’s never been given even the possibility of living for himself. Loyalty has always been his passion. So what happens when he feels his loyalty isn’t reciprocated, and an old love interest is now available to him?

    Will his loyalty fail? The very possibility suggests the continued fall away from the importance of such a principle as loyalty in our postmodern society. The film itself is filled with postmodernism, preaching self love above all and that your worth is not inherent. Ultimately, despite the stunning animation and some fun at the theater, I find this story an unsatisfying path for the Toy Story saga to go down.

    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Pixar Ranked
    (”Toy Story 2” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    1. The Incredibles

      This is one of the best animated films ever made, one of the best superhero films ever made, and I'm putting it at the top of the list of Pixar animated features. The action is great, but it's the family moments that feel so right. This one gets better as you age, and can relate more to the relationship moments. It's full of ideas, genuine emotion, great characters, amazing art direction, and fabulously efficient filmmaking. Truly a stellar film.

    2. Toy Story

      Neck-and-neck with The Incredibles, I ultimately and reluctantly decided I had to put Toy Story at no. 2. I can't find any fault with this groundbreaking, genre defining, world-changing film, so in the end, I decided it lost to The Incredibles by a smidge because The Incredibles's plot plays out a little less formulaic. Sure, Toy Story gets extra points for defining the Pixar formula, but the formula is felt more in retrospect than it is for Incredibles. This is very subjective stuff, but that's all I got.

    3. Ratatouille

      Also neck-and-neck with the nos. 1 and 2, Ratatouille is a close third. It's a great and original story, and told expertly by Bird, whose direction here is really something. Every beat of the story hits home, leading up to a glorious finish that has the hard-of-heart food critic finding love in his work again through the least-expected, and lowliest, of means.

    4. Monsters, Inc.

      A simple but ingenious concept executed with humor and heart. Also, it put Billy Crystal and John Goodman together in starring roles, with Steve Buscemi as the villain. And the door chase sequence! What more could you want?

    5. Incredibles 2

      Not your typical Pixar sequel, this is very much a Brad Bird film first and foremost. The action scenes are extraordinarily staged and executed to the extent that this is the best action film in years. The comedy feels like Chuck Jones at parts (the raccoon and Jack-Jack). Even so, character remains at the forefront as we see Mr. Incredible and Elastigirl learning to master their new roles.  Bird builds and improvises on themes in a what like an improvisatory way, the same way that Giacchino’s jazzy score does. It’s a ride from start to finish.

    6. A Bug's Life

      Pixar's second feature film is underrated and simply not talked about enough. It takes its story beats from Kurosawa's Seven Samurai, which had already been retold by The Magnificent Seven and in other places. But what Pixar does with it is fresh, full of some of Pixar's best humor, and does an amazing job of establishing each of the characters in ways that cause us to easily relate to them. Randy Newman's score is pure Americana and adds a grand feel. As far as I'm concerned, this is the best remake of Seven Samurai.

    7. Cars

      A charming, small movie that tackles great subjects. You can feel director Lasseter's love of cars and his feeling of nostalgia for a golden age gone by. It feels personal and real.

    8. WALL·E

      Wall-E, like Ratatouille, is a strange idea for a film that I can imagine caused some discomfort among studio execs. Just think, they put big money into a movie that stars two robots that can't really talk, and don't have faces with which to emote or relate, and basically the first half of the movie is a silent film. Sounds like a great idea for a kids' movie, right? I appreciate the guts and vision that went into this, and I find myself deeply involved with the two main characters when I watch it, which is a great feat of filmmaking. Even so, the films does lose points for getting preachy and political.

    9. Coco

      The best example of world-building in the Pixar canon and a wonderful and unique story. Too predictable, but the music is fantastic and you have to love the themes of the importance of remembering family.

    10. Monsters University

      A really fun movie and an enjoyable sequel whose only major fault is its predictability, that is until the very end, which allows the main characters to experience failure. Instead of abandoning arcs from the first like other Pixar sequels, this expands on them. The best Pixar sequel after Incredibles 2.

    ...plus 10 more. View the full list on Letterboxd.

    ...
    (Review Source)

John Podhoretz1
Commentary Magazine



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Incredibles 2: A Credible Sequel
    (”Toy Story 2” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    ...
    (Review Source)

PJ Media Staff6
PJ Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The Toy Story Theory (From The Guy Who Brought You The Pixar Theory)
    (”Toy Story 2” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle Last summer a friend of mine shared with me an article in which writer Jon Negroni explained his insane ideas regarding the connections between the films in the Pixar canon. I analyzed it and shared it here at PJ Lifestyle.Well, it just so happens that Negroni is back - this time he has discovered the true identity of Andy's mom in the Toy Story films. And this theory just might make some sense.Negroni's idea centers around Andy's cowboy hat, which looks an awful lot like Woody's hat, with one exception:Notice anything weird about the hat? It looks nothing like the hat worn by his favorite toy, Woody. Why wouldn't Andy wear a hat that was brown?He makes the observation that we've seen the hat in one other place: Toy Story 2. Cowgirl Jessie wears an almost identical hat. The only difference? A white band above the brim. Jessie's previous owner, Emily, had a similar, child-sized hat.Emily, Jessie's previous owner, wears that hat throughout the "When She Loved Me" sequence in Toy Story 2. The sequence clearly takes place in the 60s and 70s, as evidenced by the decoration and qualities of Emily's things.Negroni notes that, though Andy's hat lacks the white band, there is a faded area on the hat exactly where a similar band could have been.Are you tracking with me here? The perceptive Negroni notes another fascinating link between the first two films. Emily, Jessie's first owner, looks an awful lot like a younger version of - you guessed it - Andy's mom! class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2014/2/25/the-toy-story-theory-from-the-guy-who-brought-you-the-pixar-theory/ previous Page 1 of 2 next   ]]>
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    (Review Source)
  • Toy Story 3 Is One Odd Movie
    (”Toy Story 2” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    PJ Media Toy Story 3 may fill you with nostalgia -- nostalgia for a time when kids' movies were about youth and whimsy rather than aging and being forgotten.Although the third episode in the Disney-Pixar trilogy will please kids (it also has some fairly scary sequences and a really mean teddy bear) and is frequently a lot of fun, it is also suffused with a melancholy air that at times seems excessively dark. Like Shrek Forever After, which is about Shrek's wish to be free of domestic boredom, its point of view seems more aligned with Prozac-popping adults than with mischievous children.Now that it's been 11 years since Toy Story 2, the toys' owner Andy is heading off to college, leaving Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz (Tim Allen) and their pals wondering what their next move should be. They decide that living in the attic is not a bad option (though Woody believes he will be the one toy heading off to college with Andy) and spend much of the film trying to get there.Aching for a chance to be left alone to rot seems an odd goal to power the plot, but the toys' other options are to be thrown into the trash or to accept adoption by a new set of kids -- at a day care center called Sunnyside where everyone is at first made to feel welcome by the aged, wise pink teddy bear (Ned Beatty) who is in charge of the toys.There is an uncomfortable parallel between what the toys are going through and what senior citizens experience -- no one really wants them anymore and they find themselves nudged into a bright, clean new facility seemingly designed especially for them. Except their loved ones gradually turn into strangers. When Woody says, "I'm callin' it, guys -- we're closing up shop," it effectively means he's accepting retirement -- or worse. For a toy, not to be played with by a child anymore seems tantamount to death.Yet the toys are resolved to make the best of the situation until it turns out that the teddy bear is a ruthless tyrant and that he has welcomed the newbies to daycare because he needs victims. The center has a special room for toddlers who scamper around madly dunking the toys in paint and treating them roughly. The toys resolve to escape this situation and make their way back to Andy's place -- because, yes, they believe they'll be better off in Andy's attic than being played with by small children. I repeat: this movie is odd. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/blog/toy-stoy-3-is-one-odd-movie/ previous Page 1 of 2 next   ]]>
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    (Review Source)
  • Pixar's Alternate Universe?
    (”Toy Story 2” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle Everybody's a geek about something culturally. For some it's science fiction, while others may geek out over sports. For me, it's Disney culture (don't act so shocked), college sports, and Star Wars. But everybody has something that they're a geek about.Some geeks -- and I'm using the term in a cultural light, rather than referring to nerds or dorks -- go too far in their obsession. Some dress in elaborate costume for events like Comic Con or DragonCon, or even renaissance fairs. (Yes, I realize I'm stepping on some toes here.) Others show it off on their skin. Still others devote months of their time to devising theories on how a certain studio's movies are interconnected. Meet Jon Negroni.By day, Negroni manages social media and SEO for a non-profit organization, and he writes a blog for young professionals. And -- bless his heart -- he's apparently a Pixar fan. Negroni has developed an elaborate theory explaining how all the features in the Pixar canon are related.Several months ago, I watched a fun-filled video on Cracked.com that introduced the idea (at least to me) that all of the Pixar movies actually exist within the same universe. Since then, I’ve obsessed over this concept, working to complete what I call “The Pixar Theory,” a working narrative that ties all of the Pixar movies into one cohesive timeline with a main theme.Negroni's timeline runs as follows:Brave: 14-15th centuriesThe Incredibles: 1950s-60s (...thought that's up for debate, as we'll see...)Toy Story: 1997-1998Toy Story 2: 1999Finding Nemo: 2003Ratatouille: 2007Toy Story 3: 2010Up: 2011-2016Cars, Cars 2: ~2100-2200Wall-E, ~2800-2900A Bug's Life, ~2898-3000Monsters University, Monsters Inc., ~4500-5000...and all of it cycles back to Brave.class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2013/7/26/pixars-alternate-universe/ previous Page 1 of 6 next   ]]>
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    (Review Source)
  • In Defense of Ratatouille
    (”Toy Story 2” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Ratatouille Trailer', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); Today my friend Chris Queen -- a fellow member with me in the pop culture cult of Disney -- unveiled his ranking of the 12 Pixar films from worst to best.For the most part his choices drew my sympathy and tolerance, except for one: Chris stuck Ratatouille at second-to-last, ranking even the dull Cars and A Bugs Life superior:Ratatouille begins with two strikes for me. First, the setting in the world of French cuisine — not exactly the most obvious setting for a family movie night. And second, scurrying around an environment you’d want spotless? The main character is a rat.Yes, that’s right: I have a problem with a rodent as the protagonist in a Disney film. Look, I’ll admit that Mickey and Minnie Mouse are cute, classic Disney characters — and it would be sacrilege to suggest anything otherwise. But I still don’t want to see them running around in a commercial kitchen [...]I suppose Ratatouille isn’t a terrible film, but at the same time, it doesn’t exactly stay with me, either. Perhaps if it had been more memorable, it would rank higher on this list. On second thought: maybe not. Not with that disgusting rodent in the kitchen.In the words of the film's antagonist: var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Ratatouille "Highly Suspect!"', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); Chris claims two grievances that are really just his own idiosyncrasies: he rejects the French cuisine setting and finds the idea of a sewer rat protagonist distasteful.But what about those of us who love the Food Network's celebrations of high brow food and who don't suffer a wave of nausea at the thought of a cute cartoon character making our soup? class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2012/5/9/in-defense-of-ratatouille/ previous Page 1 of 2 next   ]]>
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    (Review Source)
  • The Pixar Canon: 4 Misses And 8 Hits
    (”Toy Story 2” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Brave "Families Legend" Trailer', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); This June 22, Pixar will release Brave, the studio's 13th animated feature. Brave tells the story of Merida, a Scottish princess who rebels against her royal parents with dire consequences. Even though it may be a bit darker than a typical Pixar production, Brave looks to have the stunning visuals and memorable characterizations that make Pixar films so great.Over the last 26 years Pixar has transformed animation. Partnering with Disney the studio innovated the medium in a way unseen since the days of Walt Disney himself. Many people still thought of computer animation as some sort of sci-fi pipe dream in 1986, but thanks to Pixar, the medium has become the industry standard -- and the company's films now dominate both the box office and critics' yearly top 10 lists.Pixar's dozen productions have met with varying degrees of critical and box office success. I'd say there's no such thing as a bad Pixar film, but some movies have raised the bar exponentially while others have fallen a bit short of the high standards the studio has set. I've compiled a list of the twelve movies ranked from the least to the greatest. Here we go... class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2012/5/9/the-pixar-canon-4-misses-and-8-hits/ previous Page 1 of 13 next   ]]>
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    (Review Source)

VJ Morton1
Right Wing Film Geek



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

Kyle Smith1
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • "Up": Funniest Pixar Movie Yet?
    (”Toy Story 2” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lou has the scoop on the early reviews of Disney/Pixar’s “Up,” said to be another classic and the funniest Pixar movie yet. They’re showing it to New York critics next Wednesday, I think. Just to rattle Hunter’s cage, my list of favorite Pixar movies in order: 1. Ratatouille 2. Toy Story 2 3. The Incredibles 4. Finding Nemo 5. A Bug’s Life 6. Toy Story 7. Monsters, Inc. 8. Wall-E 9. Cars]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

The Federalist Staff1
The Federalist



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Franchise-Best ‘Toy Story 4’ Puts A Forky In It
    (”Toy Story 2” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    If this is the final bow for the franchise, 'Toy Story 4' will be ending on a note so high that it should be one of the year’s Best Picture nominees.
    ...
    (Review Source)

John Hanlon1
John Hanlon Reviews



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Every Tom Hanks movie in seven minutes
    (”Toy Story 2” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Insurgent Poster Alongside new Late Late Show James Corden, troche two-time Oscar winner Tom Hanks helped recreate some of his most famous roles in a hilarious montage. Check out the video...
    ...
    (Review Source)

Plugged In1
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)


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