The Sword in the Stone

Not rated yet!
Director
Wolfgang Reitherman
Runtime
1 h 19 min
Release Date
25 December 1963
Genres
Animation, Family
Overview
Wart is a young boy who aspires to be a knight's squire. On a hunting trip he falls in on Merlin, a powerful but amnesiac wizard who has plans for him beyond mere squiredom. He starts by trying to give him an education, believing that once one has an education, one can go anywhere. Needless to say, it doesn't quite work out that way.
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PJ Media Staff4
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  • 10 Disney Classics Which Deserve a Live-Action Remake
    Lifestyle var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Cinderella Official Trailer #1 (2015) - Helena Bonham Carter, Lily James Disney Movie HD', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); Above, you can view the new trailer for Disney’s live-action remake of Cinderella. The film marks the third such reimagining, following this year’s hugely successful Maleficent and 2010's Tim Burton-directed Alice in Wonderland. If Cinderella proves successful, which seems to be a foregone conclusion, the question becomes: which other Disney classics might lend themselves to a live-action treatment?Not every old Disney film stands as an ideal candidate. Many feature talking animals as their main characters and, if you were to try to translate them into CGI within a live-action setting, wouldn’t prove that much different than their animated originals.Weeding those out, let’s rank what’s left. Here are 10 Disney classics which deserve a live-action remake. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2014/11/21/10-disney-classics-which-deserve-a-live-action-remake/ previous Page 1 of 11 next   ]]>
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  • The 10 Most Underrated Disney Animated Films
    Lifestyle Last week I shared my list of the ten most overrated Disney animated features. While it’s true that many Disney cartoons get more attention than they deserve, just as many don’t get the acclaim that they should. Here’s my list of the top ten underrated Disney animated movies. Who knows? Maybe you’ll discover a new favorite among this list. var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Walt Disney's FANTASIA 1940 Original Theatrical Trailer', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); 10. Fantasia (1940)No one can deny the artistic spectacle that is Fantasia. There wasn’t anything like it before, and there really hasn’t been anything since, other than Michael Eisner’s attempt to recreate the magic with Fantasia 2000.Fantasia makes this list because most everybody fails to realize what an audacious project the film was. Walt Disney and his collaborator, arranger and conductor Leopold Stokowski, took a tremendous risk combining animation with classical music, and the gamble didn’t pay off right away, as it took years for the feature to turn a profit.I consider Fantasia underrated because most moviegoers (even Disney fans) just don’t understand how bold and revolutionary an undertaking this piece of art truly is. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2014/6/30/the-10-most-underrated-disney-animated-films/ previous Page 1 of 10 next   ]]>
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  • 5 Reasons Why Big Hero 6 Belongs Among The Pantheon Of Disney Classics
    (”The Sword in the Stone” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle WARNING: this post contains plot spoilers! If you haven't seen Big Hero 6, go watch it - RIGHT NOW! - and then come back to read this.I recently watched Disney's latest Oscar-winning animated feature Big Hero 6 for the first (and second) time. I loved the film so much that I watched it twice in less than 24 hours. The story of Hiro Hamada, his robot buddy Baymax, and their college pals who become unwitting superheroes surprised me in so many ways that I believe Big Hero 6 deserves a place among the classics of Disney animation, and here are a few reasons why.5. Big Hero 6 contains some of the most appealing characters Disney has introduced in a long time.Over nearly a century, Disney has brought us some memorable and wonderful characters, and though the Big Hero 6 originated in the Marvel universe, the characters in the film Big Hero 6 wind up being some of the best Disney characters in recent memory.Hiro takes many character tropes - the young teen, the plucky orphan, the prodigious genius - and overcomes them with his sense of wonder at the world around him. Tadashi's selfless nature manifests itself beautifully in his love for his brother, and Aunt Cass is both high-strung and grounded as guardian of her nephews.Hiro and Tadashi's friends are terrific characters in their own right. Go-Go counters her surface misanthropy by revealing her heart at just the right times, while Honey Lemon breaks through a vapid exterior with intellect and concern for others. Wasabi's quirky neuroses belie a maturity that drives him, while Fred proves he's more than just an apparent stoner ne'er-do-well.And then there's Baymax, my personal favorite. His robotic deadpan turns out to be the perfect delivery for some of the movie's best lines (what he mines from a simple "oh no" is worth its weight in gold). Baymax proves that artificial intelligence can generate genuine heart. var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Big Hero 6 MOVIE CLIP - Unbelievable (2014) - Daniel Henney, Ryan Potter Movie HD', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); 4. The self-esteem message in Big Hero 6 contains more substance than anything else in our culture today.Nowadays pop culture tends to send the same message to young people - embrace your weirdness, let your freak flag fly. It seems like films, music, and television tell our kids that unless they're an oddball in some way they'll never fit it.Big Hero 6 conveys a self-esteem message that runs counter to current pop culture: the notion that everyone has talents and ways that they can make the world a better place. Sure, the Big Hero 6 are weird, but their value lies not in embracing their weirdness but in the skills and knowledge they possess (or, to paraphrase Tadashi, their big brains). That's a message that carries more substance than the freak flag ever will. var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Big Hero 6 Clip: The Classic Baymax Fist Bump', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); 3. Big Hero 6 appeals to boys better than most of Disney's prior attempts.Let's face it: Disney's animated output has been princess-centric since the beginning, and it seems like the studio has upped the ante since discovering the princesses' marketing power a few years back. Disney has attempted to appeal directly to boys over the years, but for various reasons, those attempts haven't really stuck long term.As wonderful as The Sword In The Stone is, it has never ranked among the classics with long-term staying power. The Black Cauldron? Nope, too dark. Unfortunately, Aladdin has had to suffer the "Princess Movie" label, despite the fact that the protagonist and titular character is a guy. The Lion King is one of the rare Disney "boy movies" that rank among the classics, and I firmly believe Big Hero 6 will join that short list.Big Hero 6 is the total package for a guy's movie: edge-of-the-seat action, high and low comedy, and a heroes-versus-villains tension (even if the villain's evil is driven by family revenge). The movie balances these elements with the right amount of heart, as well as including sly jokes that parents can laugh along with. I feel strongly that the film has the kind of staying power that will resist changing trends and attitudes, despite it's current cutting-edge style.2. There are elements of countercultural conservatism in Big Hero 6.Whether the filmmakers intended them or not, we can find threads in Big Hero 6 that suggest countercultural conservative themes. I've already discussed the unique (and positive) message of self-esteem we see in the film. We also see evidence of the value of hard work and perseverance when Baymax shows Hiro the footage of Tadashi working on his prized robot.In spite of his off-the-charts intelligence (the kid graduated high school at 13, for crying out loud!), Hiro must work hard to produce a unique invention to ensure his admission into the San Fransokyo Institute of Technology's robotics program. He even receives in invitation to work with the billionaire industrialist Alistair Krei as a result of his presentation.The most interesting countercultural conservative thread runs through the villain story. When Alistair Krei approaches Hiro after his robotics presentation, the earnest Professor Callaghan decries Krei as a selfish robber baron. Yet the villain turns out to be Callaghan, and Krei is his target. It's also worth noting that, with Krei's obvious success, his major failure is the government-sponsored teleportation project. var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Disney's Big Hero 6 - Official US Trailer 1', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); 1. Big Hero 6 conveys a message about innovation that would make Walt himself proud.One underlying - and possibly intentional - lesson from Big Hero 6 has to do with innovation, and the movie delivers it in a way that would make Walt and his inner circle proud.For starters, the competition which results in Hiro's admission to SFIT is one where prospective students seek to create truly innovative robotics applications, and Hiro wins over both Krei and Professor Callaghan with his microbots. But the kicker is Tadashi's encouragment to Hiro which leads to his invention of the microbots.When Hiro hits a dead end in coming up with ideas for the competition, Tadashi gives his younger brother advice in an unusual way:Tadashi: Hey, I'm not giving up on you.[Tadashi grabs Hiro by the ankles and hangs him upside-down over his shoulders. He begins jumping around the room, with Hiro flopping behind him.]Hiro: Ahhǃ What are you doing?Tadashi: Shake things up! Use that big brain of yours to think your way out!Hiro: What?Tadashi: Look for a new angle.[Hiro groans and decides to humor Tadashi. He looks around the room from a new angle and spots Megabot. He gets an idea.]Tadashi's advice would make Walt proud and even reads like a page out of The Imagineering Way. Hiro dishes it out when the team runs up against trouble in their battle against Callaghan. He tells the team, "Listen up! Use those big brains of yours to think your way around the problem! Look for a new angle!"And while we're at it, let's consider the coolest innovation of all - Baymax. Tadashi set out to help people, and in doing so he created the ultimate innovation in health care, one that didn't require massive federal bureaucracy.I'm telling you, Walt would be proud.*******Please join the discussion on Twitter. The essay above is the twelfth in volume 2 of the cultural discussions between the writers of PJ Lifestyle and Liberty Island exploring the history of counter-cultures, the future of conservatism and the role of new, emerging counter-cultures in restoring American exceptionalism. Want to contribute? Check out the articles below, reach out, and lets brainstorm: @DaveSwindleVolume IIFrank J. Fleming on February 26, 2015: What Is the Future of Government? Why It Won’t Look Like Star Trek Aaron C. Smith on February 26, 2015: What Is the Future of Superheroes? Why They Need To Start Killing Super-VillainsMark Ellis on February 26, 2016: What Is the Future of Gen-X Manhood? Adam Carolla Vs Chuck Palahniuk?David S. Bernstein on February 26, 2015: What is the Future of Fiction? You’ll Be Shocked Who’s Fighting the New Conservative Counter-CultureAaron C. Smith on March 2, 2015: The House Loses: Why Season 3 of House of Cards Utterly DisappointsMichael Walsh on March 2: What the Left Doesn’t Get About Robert A. HeinleinFrank J. Fleming on March 3: 8 Frank Rules For How Not to TweetSusan L.M. Goldberg on March 4: 7 Reasons Why Backstrom Is Perfect Counter-Culture Conservative TVFrank J. Fleming on March 5: What Is the Future of Religion?Aaron C. Smith on March 5: The Future of Religion: Why Judeo-Christian Values Are More Important Than ScienceSpencer Klavan on March 5: Not Religion’s Future: ISIS and the Art of DestructionSee the first volume of articles from 2014 and January and February 2015 below:2014 – Starting the Discussion...Sarah Hoyt, March 22 2014: Interview: Adam Bellow Unveils New Media Publishing Platform Liberty IslandDavid S. Bernstein, June 20 2014: What Is Liberty Island?Adam Bellow at National Review, June 30 2014 kicking off the discussion: Let Your Right Brain Run FreeDave Swindle on September 7, 2014: Why Culture Warriors Should Understand the 10 Astounding Eras of Disney Animation’s EvolutionDave Swindle on September 9, 2014: The 50 Greatest Counter-Culture Films of All Time, Part IDave Swindle on September 19, 2014: The 50 Greatest Counter-Culture Films of All Time, Part IIDavid S. Bernstein on November 19, 2014: 5 Leaders of the New Conservative Counter-CultureLiberty Island on November 22nd, 2014: A Unique Team of 33 Creative WritersDave Swindle on November 25, 2014: 7 Reasons Why Thanksgiving Will Be My Last Day on FacebookKathy Shaidle on November 25, 2014: Is America Overdue for a Satanic Revival? (Part One)Dave Swindle on December 2, 2014: My Growing List of 65 Read-ALL-Their-Books AuthorsKathy Shaidle on December 3, 2014: Is America Overdue for a Satanic Revival? (Part Two)Mark Elllis on December 9, 2014: Ozzy Osbourne and the Conservative Tent: Is He In?Aaron C. Smith on December 22, 2014: The Villains You ChooseJanuary 2015 – Volume IPaula Bolyard on January 1, 2015: 7 New Year’s Resolutions for ConservativesSusan L.M. Goldberg on January 1, 2015: The Plan to Take Back Feminism in 2015Kathy Shaidle on January 4, 2015: Did the 1960s Really Happen? (Part One)Andrew Klavan on January 5, 2015: In 2015 The New Counter-Culture Needs to Be Offensive!Clay Waters on January 5, 2015: The Decline and Fall of Russell BrandMark Ellis on January 5, 2015: How Conservatives Can Counter the Likable LiberalAudie Cockings on January 5, 2015: Entertainers Have Shorter LifespansAaron C. Smith on January 6, 2015: How Mario Cuomo Honestly Defined Zero-Sum LiberalismStephen McDonald on January 10, 2015: Why the New Counter-Culture Should Make Strength Central to Its IdentityStephen McDonald on January 16, 2015: The Metaphorical WarKathy Shaidle on January 19, 2015: Did the 1960s Really Happen? (Part Two)Frank J. Fleming on January 20, 2015: What if Red Dawn Happened, But It Was Islamic Terrorists Instead of Communists?Mark Ellis on January 21, 2015: Adam Carolla: The Quintessential Counterculture Conservative?Aaron C. Smith on January 29, 2015: Objection! Why TV’s The Good Wife Isn’t Good LawFebruary 2015David Solway on February 2, 2015: For a Song To Be Good, Must It Tell The Truth?Mark Ellis on February 6, 2015: President Me: Adam Carolla Vs. the Scourge of NarcissismDavid Solway on February 6, 2015: ‘Imagine’ a World Without the BrotherhoodKathy Shaidle on February 9, 2015: Was Rod McKuen the Secret Godfather of Punk Rock?Aaron C. Smith on February 10, 2015: Kick NBC While It’s Down: Use The Williams Scandal to Set the Terms of the 2016 DebatesSpencer Klavan on February 12, 2015: How to Apologize for Your Thought CrimesKathy Shaidle on February 16, 2015: David Byrne: Creepy Liberal HypocriteDavid P. Goldman on February 18, 2015: Understanding This Bloody Truth About the Bible Will Save Your LifeLisa De Pasquale on February 20, 2015: Why American Sniper Is a Much Better Love Story Than Fifty Shades of GreySpencer Klavan on February 24, 2015: How Bad Ideology Destroys Good TV: Why Glee Crashed and Burnedclass="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2015/3/7/5-reasons-why-big-hero-6-belongs-among-the-pantheon-of-disney-classics/ ]]>
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  • Can't We Just Go Back to Letting Magic Swords Pick Our Leaders?
    (”The Sword in the Stone” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle Cracked.Com today released a new gallery of satirical images imagining "If the Real World Played by Disney Cartoon Rules."With the general election season now officially underway this one jumped out, recalling more traditional, less complicated systems of leadership selection:Of course, the obligatory Monty Python reference, necessary for all discussions of Excalibur-based elections: var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Constitutional Peasants - Monty Python and the Holy Grail', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); DENNIS: Listen -- strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some farcical aquatic ceremony.ARTHUR: Be quiet!DENNIS: Well you can't expect to wield supreme executive power just 'cause some watery tart threw a sword at you!(Amusing fact of the day: the entire script of Monty Python and the Holy Grail is available at Sacred-Texts.com.)BTW, a related point that I'll elaborate on in greater length when I start compiling lists of Disney movies: Unfortunately, Sword in the Stone is one of the weakest films in the Disney canon. Any time Disney movies chose to string together a series of stand-alone episodes instead of developing a full-length narrative a weaker film emerged. But perhaps I'm wrong and should give the movie another look. Any Sword in the Stone defenders out there? class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2012/4/11/cant-we-just-go-back-to-letting-magic-swords-pick-our-leaders/ ]]>
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Kyle Smith2
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • John Lasseter, the New Disney
    The Financial Times has a “Lunch with…” piece on John Lasseter, the maestro of Pixar and the closest thing the Walt Disney Co. or any other studio has to Uncle Walt himself. Things I didn’t know: That Lasseter is from Whittier, Calif., also Richard Nixon’s hometown….that he started a winery after his wife came home from “picking wine” (picking grapes, surely?) and exclaimed, “Make love to me!” And that Lasseter was turned on to the possibilities of animation by Disney’s….”The Sword in the Stone”? This was also one of the very first Disney movies I ever saw, and one that was extremely dear to me as well. For many years, Disney re-issued its cartoon features every seven years or so. It originally came out in 1963. Could I have seen it at age four in 1970? Possible. Another great 1960s Disney cartoon I loved as a kid was a musical “Robin Hood,” in which Robin was a fox. Brilliant stuff.]]>
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  • The Question People Always Ask Film Critics
    (”The Sword in the Stone” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    People so often say the same things when they learn I’m a film critic that I’ve considered saving them the trouble: “I’m Kyle. I’m a film critic. I see about five or six movies a week.” I’m not sure why people ask this question. Does it make a difference if I see four movies a week or seven? I see a lot of movies. A far more interesting question I am rarely asked: What’s the most famous movie you’ve never seen? Until last week, I’m not sure I’d ever seen “Pinocchio.” I asked my mom: “Have I ever seen ‘Pinocchio’?” “Oh, yes, I’m sure you did,” she said. “I used to take you to all those movies.” I distinctly remember seeing “Snow White,” “Cinderella,” “The Sword in the Stone,” “Bedknobs and Broomsticks,” “Robin Hood,” etc. But I don’t know whether I saw “Pinocchio.” It’s hard to tell, because the story is so engrained in culture that you know it even if you haven’t seen it, from the current Disney theme song “When You Wish Upon a Star” to “let your conscience be your guide” to the end. I remember watching it on my “Viewmaster,” which was a little binoculars-like contraption. You’d insert a disc with pictures and captions made 3-D by the gadget. A couple of discs would summarize an entire movie pretty neatly. And I’d seen clips from the movie innumerable times. Still, I don’t think I ever saw the whole thing through. But since it just came out on DVD, I popped it in the other day and was haunted by the stark Biblical nature of the piece. The God-and-man parallel couldn’t be clearer when the Blue Fairy gives Pinocchio temporary life but warns him that he’ll have to make the right moral choices to achieve permanent personhood. He immediately skips school instead, lured by the call of celebrity and a career on the stage — not realizing that he is the butt of all jokes and a prisoner of a traveling puppet-show producer. Stuck in a bird cage, he calls upon the Blue Fairy for help, which she provides (after he lies about the causes of his predicament, causing the famous nasal elongation) — but, again, she provides a stern warning: This will be the last time she can help him. There is a strong message of free will and individual choice in the movie. It could not be more different from, say, “Wall-E,” whose theme is that of collective guilt that no individual can do much of anything about (except an innocent robot who presumably had nothing to do with the destruction of the planet in the first place and more or less saves the planet accidentally, while chasing a girl). That the guilt is just assumed in “Wall-E” is one reason why I find it dramatically unsatisfying. It’s a cop-out, isn’t it? We all think of ourselves as virtuous. We recycle. “Wall-E” allows us to blame mankind in general rather than ourselves in particular. We identify with “Pinocchio” and his mistakes, though. His journey is ours. ]]>
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Plugged In1
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Lions, Elephants, Genies, Witches and Jedi, oh My!
    (”The Sword in the Stone” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    Didja see it? The new (and first full-length) trailer for Disney’s remake of The Lion King? I didn’t watch it until this morning, which made me only about the 16 millionth person to do so in the last two days. And even though 1994’s animated classic The Lion King isn’t actually one of my favorite […]

    The post Lions, Elephants, Genies, Witches and Jedi, oh My! appeared first on Plugged In Blog.

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The Weekly Standard Staff1
The Weekly Standard



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • About that Other Controversial BuzzFeed Story
    (”The Sword in the Stone” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Over the weekend BuzzFeed published what it called "the definitive ranking" of Disney animation films. All 56 of them. This is, as my Substandard colleague Sonny Bunch would say, a garbage list. It's such a garbage list that I'm not even going to link to it, because I want to save you the anger and deny BuzzFeed the clicks. But I want to talk about the list just this same, because this is kind of my beat. Buzzfeed argues that Disney's top five animated films are: Beauty and the Be
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