The Princess and the Frog

Not rated yet!
Director
Ron Clements, John Musker
Runtime
1 h 37 min
Release Date
8 December 2009
Genres
Romance, Family, Animation, Music
Overview
A waitress, desperate to fulfill her dreams as a restaurant owner, is set on a journey to turn a frog prince back into a human being, but she has to do face the same problem after she kisses him.
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PJ Media Staff4
PJ Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • A Radical Ranking of Disney's 8 Best Animated Features
    Lifestyle You may remember my experience last week where I received the strange basket of apples with a cryptic note from Valerie. I ate one of the apples and fell into a deep sleep, after which I received the strangest ideas for how to improve Walt Disney World. So I wrote them down, and my editor posted them here.Well, I decided to try a second apple from the basket. One bite of this next apple, and I passed out again. I woke up with the inspiration to rank some of Disney's best cartoons. Get ready, because I guarantee you that you've never seen Disney's films in this light... var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Wreck It Ralph - BAD-ANON', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); 8. Wreck-It Ralph (2012)Just picture it: a large, virile character roams the world, and though people see him as a bad guy, he's really good inside, and in the end, he saves the day!Am I talking about Wreck-It Ralph? Of course I am, but in reality I'm talking about the man whose life I'm convinced the movie is a metaphor for: our wonderful ally Vladimir Putin. Just think about it. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2014/11/26/a-radical-ranking-of-disneys-8-best-animated-features/ previous Page 1 of 8 next   ]]>
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  • The 10 Most Underrated Disney Animated Films
    Lifestyle Last week I shared my list of the ten most overrated Disney animated features. While it’s true that many Disney cartoons get more attention than they deserve, just as many don’t get the acclaim that they should. Here’s my list of the top ten underrated Disney animated movies. Who knows? Maybe you’ll discover a new favorite among this list. var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Walt Disney's FANTASIA 1940 Original Theatrical Trailer', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); 10. Fantasia (1940)No one can deny the artistic spectacle that is Fantasia. There wasn’t anything like it before, and there really hasn’t been anything since, other than Michael Eisner’s attempt to recreate the magic with Fantasia 2000.Fantasia makes this list because most everybody fails to realize what an audacious project the film was. Walt Disney and his collaborator, arranger and conductor Leopold Stokowski, took a tremendous risk combining animation with classical music, and the gamble didn’t pay off right away, as it took years for the feature to turn a profit.I consider Fantasia underrated because most moviegoers (even Disney fans) just don’t understand how bold and revolutionary an undertaking this piece of art truly is. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2014/6/30/the-10-most-underrated-disney-animated-films/ previous Page 1 of 10 next   ]]>
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  • Is Winnie the Pooh Fresh Hunny?
    (”The Princess and the Frog” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle Kyle Smith seems to think so:Disney's big-screen "Winnie the Pooh" lovingly re-creates those delightful cartoons -- right down to the theme song, the characters wandering out of their illustrations to toddle across the sentences of A.A. Milne's stories and even the imperishable voice of Pooh. Sterling Holloway, who did those scratchy, uncertain vocals, has perished. But actor Jim Cummings has him down cold.More at Rotten Tomatoes.Given the successes of "Tangled" and "The Princess and the Frog" also it now seems safe to say that Disney Animation has returned to another BOOM period after a decade of mediocrity and irrelevancy. Will the films coming top the high quality offerings of the Disney Renaissance period? Considering the trends in Disney's work (each BOOM period is better than the one that came before it) I would wager yes.While we're eager to get out and see it methinks that The Wife and I will wait until next week AFTER Carmageddon is over this weekend. var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Winnie the Pooh Official Trailer', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); Actually, on second thought... After watching that trailer again maybe we will brave the wilds of Carmageddon to make it to the theatre. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2011/7/15/is-winnie-the-pooh-fresh-hunny/ ]]>
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  • Catch it if you missed it: Disney's "Tangled" is studio's best film in the last decade
    (”The Princess and the Frog” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    PJ Media var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Disney Tangled Trailer Official', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); The Wife and I finally caught this one this week via Netlifx.We're both Disney fanatics but ended up avoiding "Tangled" when it was in theatres. I wanted to see it but April was skeptical of non-Pixar Disney computer animation. She was not particularly blown away by their last CGI efforts - "Bolt," "Meet the Robinson," and "Chicken Little" -- so we passed seeing it in theatres. BIG MISTAKE.The animation in "Tangled" is colorful and vivid -- heads and tails above Disney's previous efforts, far superior to Dreamworks, and at the same level as Pixar. More important, though, is the quality of the film itself. "Tangled," which is an adaptation of Rapunzel, hits all the bases of traditional Disney animation.  Its characters, music, and sense of adventure are right up with the best of the Disney Renaissance period and the previous artistic/commercial high of the "Cinderella" through "Sleeping Beauty" 1950s period.And don't be fooled by the trailer embedded above which really doesn't do the film justice. They had no idea how to market this film -- hence the stupid decision to rename it "Tangled" to try and appeal to a young boy demographic. They should have just called it "Rapunzel." But that's really the only point of criticism I have with the picture. Were I still a film critic it would have earned an A in my ratings system, thus identifying itself as a film worth purchasing on DVD (or Blu-Ray today) and watching multiple times.Given the success of both "Tangled" and "The Princess and the Frog" I have high hopes for "Winnie the Pooh" next weekend. It looks like Disney may be returning to one of its Boom periods after 10 years' worth of wandering in the animated wilderness while Pixar kept the Disney tradition alive. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/blog/catch-it-if-you-missed-it-disneys-tangled-is-studios-best-film-in-the-last-decade/ ]]>
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Conservative Film Buff1
Letterboxd



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)
  • The Princess and the Frog

    ★★★★★ Added

    The best Disney animated film since the Disney Renaissance. Hands down.

    Also, the best looking Disney animated film since the Renaissance. Such amazing animation and attention to detail, with stylized sequences such as the Art Deco “Almost There” sequence, the brightness of the “When We’re Human” song, and the darkness of the tombs at the end of the film lending to the overall richness of tone.

    Of course, they spent a ton to make it look that good. And of… more

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The Federalist Staff2
The Federalist



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • 4 Reasons 'The Princess And The Frog' Is Better Than 'Frozen'
    Released in 2009 when I was past my own Disney movie-watching phase and had yet to have kids, “The Princess and the Frog” slipped by me. I watched it recently, having tired of my daughter’s incessant “Frozen” requests, and I am floored by how little attention this beautiful film gets by comparison. It’s so clearly “Frozen’s” superior, it deserves revisiting and reevaluation. The Story Well, it has one. The story of “The Princess and the Frog” is ambitious. A retelling of the classic fairy tale set in early-twentieth-century New Orleans and starring Disney’s first African-American princess is a lot of quirky, disparate, possibly problematic threads to bring together in a kid-friendly concoction. The movie does it admirably. “[G]ood gravy! A story! Characters! A plot!” Roger Ebert exclaimed in his review. Without hitting viewers over the head, the story offers glimpses of New Orleans’s many cultures—black, white, Creole, Cajun, French, and voodoo influences. There are hints at the power structure of the South, which puts the movie’s heroine, Tiana, traveling the trolley line every day between her modest home and the cotton-money mansion of her mother’s employer and his Southern belle daughter, Charlotte. Tiana grows up to be a hard-working waitress with several jobs and an aspiring entrepreneur, saving money to open her own restaurant — a dream she shared with her late father. Enter a playboy prince from an unspecified overseas land who visits New Orleans in search of a moneyed bride with which to exchange his family name for some family dough. The reckless royal gets tangled in some dark magic via the film’s villain, Dr. Faciler, and is turned into a frog. Our heroine, in desperate need of some luck, consents to kiss the frog prince, but is turned into a frog herself. The two go on a bayou odyssey peppered with memorable anthropomorphic characters, obstacles, and musical numbers as they attempt to become human again. This story accomplishes more in its establishing 20 minutes than “Frozen” pulls off in 90. Every character’s motivations make sense (cough, Hans, cough), and we care about all of them, down to the wizened Cajun lightning bug. The film also has loving parents who aren’t hastily thrown into a watery grave after sentencing their children to some formative years of extreme isolation and fear, so Tiana has that going for her. Unlike in “Frozen,” the magic that puts the plot in motion is not only explained, but has some cultural resonance and history. “The Princess and the Frog,” to protestations from some Christian groups and social-justice warrior types, employs voodoo powers as an evil force in the hands of Facilier and a force for good in Mama Odi, a skilled Voodoo queen. For those who know little of voodoo’s history, talisman and dolls are familiar enough to give the story’s magic origin. At the end of “Frozen,” I wanted a one-on-one with Pabbie troll. “Born with the powers or cursed?” Explain yourself, man. The writer and director of “Frozen,” Jennifer Lee, said the lack of explanation was a form of simplification: “[W]e had this whole explanation like when Saturn is in this alignment with such-and-such on the thousandth year a child will be born and blah, blah, blah. We found the more you explained the more questions you had about magic and the rules. It was like, argh. You know?” As it is, I am left to wonder if Elsa got her powers from the snow, some Nordic god, or the troll doll on the dash of my ’96 Civic. The Animation “The Princess and the Frog” is hand-drawn— a conscious throwback to the more 2D look of classic Disney movies of the mid-century “Lady and the Tramp” and “Sleeping Beauty” era. “Frozen” is certainly visually stunning, but “The Princess and the Frog” feels warmer and more organic. This is also appropriate to the settings of each movie. A portrayal of the icy alpine world of Elsa and Anna is more suited to computer graphics than the muggy, mystic evirons of South Louisiana. There is one dream sequence in “Princess and the Frog” that tops even Elsa’s falling ice chandelier, which I grant is a pretty great Michael-Bay-meets-Disney moment. Tiana dreams of her own restaurant to the tune of the driving, aspirational “Almost There,” and the interior is wrought in art deco cut-outs. Waiters, tables, and musicians swirl in Esther Williams choreography, with the look and color scheme of an Aaron Douglas painting of the Harlem Renaissance. The Soundtrack That’s right, I said it. I know I’m in the minority, but while “Frozen’s” soundtrack has its moments, most of them are cute, not great. Idina Menzel’s voice is amazing, but “Let It Go” is just so-so. “The Princess and the Frog” soundtrack is soulful, Southern, and sophisticated, composed by Randy Newman and full of nods to the region’s sound— “Dixieland jazz (played by a snaggletoothed bayou gator), zydeco (sung by a crazily accented firefly), Creole waltzes, swamp blues, and gospel, as well as two requisite Broadway-style show stoppers, ‘Almost There’ and ‘Dig a Little Deeper,'” John Podhoretz wrote in a 2009 review. Watching “Frozen” was the moment I noticed how far Disney songs had fallen in lyrical sophistication since the ’90s era. Whither Aladdin’s “genuflect, show some respect, down on one knee?” Now we have “I don’t know if I’m elated or gassy” and “know” and “go” rhyme. Fine, but it’s a lyrical comedown from Eminem to Ja-Rule. We never hit “Beauty and the Beast”-level rhyming of “I’m especially good at expectorating” and “I use antlers in all of my decorating” in “The Princess and the Frog,” but there are hints at it. Facilier’s big solo warns “don’t disrespect me, little man / Don’t derogate or deride,” because he has “friends on the other side.” The Message “Frozen” is rightly praised for its elevation of filial love over the romantic love that so often drives Disney films. This formulation gives viewers some variety and feminists plenty to cheer about in a princess story for a new generation. “The Princess and the Frog” gives the same opportunities to its heroine, setting her up as a career-driven hard worker. Her envisioned restaurant is unabashedly named “Tiana’s Place.” Based loosely on Leah Chase, longtime co-owner and chef of New Orleans staple Dooky Chase, Tiana is independent and surprising, especially for her time. She and her prince, Naveen, go through hardship, life lessons, and transformations together before they fall in love. Frankly, they spend more time together than Anna and Elsa do. “The Princess and the Frog,” of course, ran into criticism. Tiana got her name after her original name, Maddy, was rejected as too close to “Mammy” or something. Others objected to Naveen’s skin color— voiced by a Brazilian actor, Disney says he’s non-white, but he was considered so light by some as to suggest black men aren’t worthy of the pantheon of Disney princes. Some fretted about portrayals of voodoo, jazz, and the bayou reinforcing stereotypes instead of rising above them. Chase herself had some words for critics: “You’re going to have people who find fault with anything. Now people may think, ‘Oh, you showed us this way, like we’re country, like we’re Cajun.’ What’s wrong with that? That’s cute, I thought. If you can’t laugh at yourself in life, you’re missing the boat.” In other words, let it go. ]]>
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Crosswalk1
Cross Walk



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Some of the Old Disney Magic Exists in The Princess and the Frog
    Movies DVD Release Date:  March 16, 2010Theatrical Release Date:  December 11, 2009Rating:  GGenre:  Family/AnimatedRun Time:  97 min.Directors:  Ron Clements, John MuskerVoices by:  Oprah Winfrey, Terrence Howard, John Goodman, Anika Noni Rose, Bruno Campos, Keith David, Michael-Leon Wooley, Jennifer Cody, Jim Cummings, Peter BartlettOnce upon a time, Disney's creative team actually used to churn out regular programming that didn't involve Hannah Montana. Or "the suite life" of Zack and Cody. Imagine that.In fact, long before Pixar ruled the animated roost, Disney's animators used to dream up fabulously enchanting 2-D movies (yes, no nerdy glasses required) with characters so memorable and beloved that you'd laugh, cry and have their accompanying songs stuck in your head for weeks right along with them. These are actually the movies I grew up watching and loving well into my twenties, thrilling cinematic fare like The Little Mermaid, Aladdin, The Lion King and Mulan.Perhaps hoping to prove they still have some of that old magic left, the creators of The Princess and the Frog get nostalgic and try capitalizing on everything that's worked so well in the past while taking advantage of new technological advancements, too. Not only are there plenty of show-stopping musical numbers worthy of Broadway, but the colorful, hand-drawn animation has never been more spectacular. Even the heroine, the feisty, hard-working Tiana (voiced by Anika Noni Rose) is a step forward for princesses. Not only is she Disney's first African-American royalty, but she's a down-to-earth girl with a goal far greater than simply landing herself a hottie prince. Instead, the girl who mastered her dad's gumbo recipe long before her peers probably learned to ride a bike wants to accomplish what her father couldn't:  a lifelong dream of opening a Cajun restaurant in an old mill nearby.Of course, the odds are definitely stacked against Tiana, given her modest upbringing in New Orleans' famed French Quarter. When Tiana's mom isn't hanging out with her husband and daughter, her favorite activity by far, Tiana's mom (lovingly voiced by Oprah) is whipping up elaborate dresses to satisfy the fashion whims of Tiana's privileged peers. No doubt from her mom's and dad's example, Tiana realizes the value of hard work from a young age and wholeheartedly believes her dream will come true if she puts in the time and elbow grease. And when time and elbow grease isn't enough, well, there's always the requisite "wishing upon a star." While virtually every Disney movie extols this dreamy notion, Tiana does so with the fervency of prayer. She wants this restaurant so much, so desperately, that she's even willing to put aside fun social events and momentary pleasures to get a little closer.Then, just as she's about to finally close on the mill she's always envisioned as "Tiana's Place," she's suddenly outbid and forced to go back to the proverbial drawing board. Well, until a talking frog, claiming to be a prince promises that her fate could change with one little kiss. And even though she made it clear, very clear, in the beginning that she'd never, ever kiss a frog, she's willing to reconsider if it helped her future restaurant's cause. So she reluctantly smooches him, and poof, he doesn't turn into a prince.Yep, she turns into a frog instead, thanks to a voodoo curse that's been put on Naveen (Bruno Campos) a gorgeous but vapid rich kid who's fresh out of money. Hoping to marry up so he can retain the luxurious standard of living he'd been accustomed to, he actually believed Tiana was the answer to his prayers because she was sporting a tiara.Turns out, that tiara was just part of the costume Tiana donned for the ball, an event she was serving tasty treats at rather than really enjoying. But once she bumped into Naveen the frog, she hoped, like oh-so-many Disney princesses before her that there would also be a fairy-tale ending for her. Now embodying the very body of the slimy creatures she's always hated, Tiana wants nothing more than to be human again, coincidentally, the opposite plight that Ariel faced in The Little Mermaid. But regaining her former human status isn't quite as easy as she or Naveen hoped, which leads them on a decidedly retro journey involving a smattering of unconventional friends, a wealth of opportunities to sing (which is what Disney characters always do in peril, right?) and a happy-ever-after ending that audience is ultimately clamoring for.The Princess and the Frog certainly delivers in many ways, however, there's still something slightly hollow about it. While magic and sorcery have played a part in virtually every Disney story, the heavy emphasis on voo-doo definitely weighs down what's ultimately a enjoyable, family-friendly event. Not only are there a slew of scary, darker moments that won't sit well with the younger set (and will leave their parents scratching their heads), but even the confident, go get ‘em spirit that made our heroine so engaging is eventually toned down in favor of a familiar, disturbing end. Basically when in doubt, the script suggests that a woman shouldn't be afraid to exchange a kiss for a shot at the big time, a misleading notion that doesn't exactly send the right message, no matter how noble the cause. CAUTIONS: Drugs/Alcohol:  Wine and champagne served and consumed at social events.Language/Profanity:  No actual profanity, just one use of "dang" and "heck."Sex/Nudity:  Some cleavage-revealed gowns on a few of the women. At one point, Ray (a Cajun firefly) mentions that one of his lightning bug pals got in trouble when he flashed the neighbors. Prince Naveen is quite the ladies' man and references that on a couple of occasions.Violence:  Mostly of a comedic nature, although there are a handful of perilous situations when the frogs are chased by hunters and other swampland creatures. In another scene, Ray actually gets squashed. Other characters are chased and dragged by shadow-y figures.Religion:  Given that it's set in New Orleans, it's probably no surprise that voo-doo makes it into the movie somehow. In this case, it drives the evil part of the plot. The Shadow Man, a shady nemesis with his own endgame consults tarot cards and gets help from his "friends from the other side" to carry out his plans. He eventually uses these dark powers to turn Naveen into a frog (and Naveen's butler into a prince, something he's always wanted to be). But when The Shadow Man's spell on Naveen loses its potency because it's running out of the prince's blood, he promises his dead friends (who are now masks hanging on his wall) that when he's in charge, they'll have control over the wayward souls in the city if they help him.    Christa Banister is a full-time freelancer writer, specializing in music, movies and books-related reviews and interviews and is the author of two novels, Around the World in 80 Dates and Blessed Are the Meddlers. Based in St. Paul, Minn., she also weighs in on various aspects of pop culture on her personal blog.  For more information, including her upcoming book signings and sample chapters of her novels, check out her Website. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-1'); }); googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-2'); }); if (gptClientWidth >= 992 && gptClientWidth <= 1000000) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-3'); });   ]]>
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Plugged In1
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • What’s New and Streaming for Families in July (2019)

    It’s July and the livin’ is easy … along with being sun-baked and maybe a tad sweaty now and again. And once you get your fill of all those fun activities in the great outdoors, you might find yourself in the mood for a little air-conditioned leisure with a helping of streaming entertainment on the […]

    The post What’s New and Streaming for Families in July (2019) appeared first on Plugged In Blog.

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Kyle Smith1
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Disney Bets Big on Hand-Drawn Animation
    (”The Princess and the Frog” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    An interesting Wall Street Journal article looks at Disney’s decision — encouraged by Pixar’s chiefs — to go hand-drawn with its latest, $150 million feature, “The Princess and the Frog.” I think the rival feature “Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel” is going to be a much bigger hit because it’s easier to explain and because kids want to laugh. Also, I can’t picture boys going to see a movie with “princess” in the title, but Alvin and Co. are bound to appeal to both boys and girls. A surprising tidbit from the article: hand-drawn and computer-animated movies cost about the same. Shouldn’t digital technology be saving studios money? So far it doesn’t look like it has. “Avatar” isn’t cheap either, and it doesn’t even have expensive actors.]]>
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Acculturated1
Acculturated



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • A Dad's Guide to Disney Princesses, from Ariel to Cinderella
    (”The Princess and the Frog” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    If you have daughters, you might be able to steer clear of the American Girl dolls, but you cannot avoid the Disney princesses. They’re in movies and on lunchboxes. There are raincoats and boots and vitamins with them. There are dolls and sticker sets and games where you build plastic cupcakes tailor-made for each character. The princesses are inescapable. Some are wonderful characters and excellent role models for the important young ladies in your life. Others are . . . less so. Herewith is a ranking of the Disney princesses by moral character and general awesomeness: #9 Ariel: The Little Mermaid may have been the movie that reinvigorated Disney animation, but as an example for little girls, it’s the worst. The real story of the movie is that a man’s daughter falls in love with some guy she’s never even spoken with, goes through body modification in the hopes that he’ll love her back—and then her moronic crush costs her father his kingdom. Imagine your daughter coming home and saying, “Dad, this biker gang drove through town today and the guy leading it was amazing and I love him. I’m going to get a bunch of piercings and tattoos so that I can join the gang. And then I just know he’ll love me back!!” Well, that’s what Ariel does. And her father winds up paying for the tats. And the “happy” ending in all of this is that to marry her biker-gang prince, Ariel has to live in a whole new world and be separated from her father for the rest of his life. Which she does without any hesitation. At all. Keep your daughters far, far away from this movie. #8 Pocahontas: The lessons of Pocahontas might be worse. A band of conquistadors suddenly appears and will soon commit genocide against the Native American people. But one of these guys is dreamy! So Pocahontas lectures her dad about stereotyping and Anglophobia. The only reason Pocahontas is ranked above Ariel is that she actually talks to John Smith before falling in love with the dope and betraying her people. #7 Tiana/Rapunzel: You might not realize it, but the characters from Tangled and The Princess and the Frog have a lot in common: They’re plucky. They believe in the power of their dreams. And they teach girls a terrible lesson: No matter how bad a boy might seem on the surface, a girl can change him through the power of love. Here’s a Life Spoiler for little princesses who think they can change bad boys: No, you can’t. #6 Aurora/Snow White: Two more princesses with a lot in common. They’re both blank slates who spend the interesting parts of their movies asleep. And they both teach girls that good-hearted people trust strangers. #5 Jasmine: The moral lesson at the heart of Aladdin is pretty much: Your father doesn’t know best and you should rebel against him. Hard. But in fairness to Princess Jasmine, her father is a weak, easily-led fool. So while Princess Jasmine isn’t a good role model for your daughter—because you’re not a dimwitted sultan—she’s just fine for girls with rotten or absent fathers. #4 Belle: Now we get to the good princesses. Beauty and the Beast is the most Broadway of the Disney movies and, as such, is kind of annoying. But the moral of the story is fantastic: Don’t automatically trust the good-looking, popular jock because he’s probably a bro-creep—even if everyone else likes him. That’s the textual message. The subtext is even better: Belle teaches girls that reading is the gateway to a life of adventure. As the kids say, +1. Also: Belle is willing to go to prison in exchange for her father’s freedom. Which makes it totally worth sitting through the cloying show tunes. #3 Mulan: Where Belle offers to be thrown in a dungeon to secure her father’s safety, Mulan goes to war for her dad. The message of Mulan for girls is simple, unmistakable, and awesome: Honor and family before all. #2 Anna and Elsa: The Frozen princesses get grouped together even though they offer different lessons. Elsa is a model of self-sacrifice and filial love. Also, repression: She holds back her mutant powers for years after her father’s death in deference to his memory. Also, she understands that it would be insane for her sister to marry a guy she just met. And Anna, for her part, ditches not one, but two dreamboats in order to save her sister. She’s even ready to get sliced in half by a broadsword for Elsa. Because she knows that love for her family trumps boy-crushes. All hail Anna, the anti-Ariel. #1 Cinderella: Disney’s greatest princess is also its most underappreciated. The conventional wisdom on Cinderella is that she’s a Mary Sue who does nothing except wait for a prince to rescue her. But that’s dead wrong. Cinderella is the embodiment of two of great virtues: courage and kindness. She suffers terribly, the victim of both circumstance and genuine evil. And yet she is neither embittered nor defeated. Disney’s 2015 live-action Cinderella makes the lesson explicit. As Cinderella’s mother lay dying, she tells her daughter, “I have to tell you a secret that will see you through all the trials that life can offer: Have courage and be kind.” Those are words to live by. Cinderella is an object lesson in humanity and grace—not just for little girls, but for everyone.           ]]>
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Return of Kings Staff1
Return of Kings



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

⚠️ EDGY 🔥 CONTENT 🔥 WARNING 🔥 (NSFW?) ⚠️

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  • 6 Examples Of How Disney Is Brainwashing Young Girls To Be Feminist Slaves
    (”The Princess and the Frog” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    I'm a heterosexual anti-feminist and a conservative male. A frequent news watcher and I dedicate my findings to various MRA sites and anti-feminist authors. I enjoy swimming, hiking, observing mainstream entertainment and masculine literature.
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Kelly Jane Torrance1
The Weekly Standard



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)


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