The Girl on the Train

Not rated yet!
Director
Tate Taylor
Runtime
1 h 52 min
Release Date
5 October 2016
Genres
Crime, Drama, Mystery, Romance, Thriller
Overview
Rachel Watson, devastated by her recent divorce, spends her daily commute fantasizing about the seemingly perfect couple who live in a house that her train passes every day, until one morning she sees something shocking happen there and becomes entangled in the mystery that unfolds.
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Society Reviews2
Society Reviews



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The best way I can describe The Girl on the Train is a great set up but poor execution.

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  • Personal Shopper Review
    (”The Girl on the Train” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    When it comes to Personal Shopper, there is a lot to like about this film, but you really have to question the decision-making in the writing. The ending is pretty bad as it serves to ask more questions that will never be answered and feels very out of place with the other 100 minutes. The film was booed at Cannes and it seems justified. Personal Shopper is what happens when you shoot yourself in the foot creatively.

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Crosswalk1
Cross Walk



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • We're Not On Board with The Girl on the Train
    Movies Can a broken woman go from complete trainwreck to a clear track again? The Girl on the Train wants to say something about 'girls' using metaphors about trains and tunnels, but it's only the star turn from Emily Blunt that outstrips the sad lives, graphic content and disappointing mystery on screen. 1.5 out of 5.   Synopsis Rachel Watson (Blunt). Megan Hipwell (Haley Bennett). Anna Watson née Boyd (Rebecca Ferguson). These are the three women at the center of this supposed psychological thriller based on the bestselling 2015 book by Paula Hawkins. Rachel's a voyeuristic, unemployed alcoholic who can't get past her divorce from Tom (Justin Theroux); Anna's the other woman who became Tom's wife and a happy new mother; Megan is Anna's neighbor, nanny and, as she tells us, several other things. But by the time you're done figuring out who's who, how their lives all interconnect and who's lying - which are actually pretty much the same things Rachel spends the film trying to discern - you may no longer care whodunit or why. The more distracting mystery is why the producers moved the setting from London to New York while casting European actors (Blunt, Ferguson, Luke Evans) who struggle to cover their accents.   What Works? Well, there are few movies that offer this many juicy roles for women. The best things about The Girl on the Train are Blunt's performance (she plays degress of drunkeness and lucidity better than almost anyone I've seen) and watching Detective Riley (the always-reliable Allison Janney) track down leads and look down on Rachel. Director Tate Taylor (The Help) puts forth an effort to imbue the film with artsy thematics ala David Fincher's Gone Girl, but whiffs more than he connects. An interesting symbolic concept about how women are bound together either by choice or by what men do to them is too little, too late. Taylor does succeed, however, in visualizing a tricky component of the novel's narrative: memories Rachel replays in her mind that may or may not be real.   What Doesn't? See the list of Cautions below. This is a hard-to-watch, hard-R movie. It wants to tell the story of a woman regaining control of her world by closely observing others, but by the time we get there via the route we have to take we're just exhausted and uninspired. The male cast members are neither memorable nor dissimilar enough in look or personality; Theroux in particular seems miscast in a very central role. The Girl on the Train has an oppressive, unsettling tone with very little redemption or reward to take home. When your premise is built around your main character being unsure if she could have committed an unspeakable crime, but you're never in doubt as to her capabilities, there just isn't enough intrigue to balance out the ennui.   googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-1'); }); Christian Worldview Elements / Spiritual Themes If there's a positive, it's that infidelity is clearly shown to ruin lives and lead to even worse things, like death. Similarly, alcohol is the cause of many problems, the worst of which is no longer being able to trust what's true. There is also a caution against thinking the grass is greener when envying supposedly 'perfect' couples. One character tells another in no uncertain terms to have an abortion. Motherhood is shown in a very unflattering light here. Rachel attends an AA meeting. Abusers reap what they sow. One character visits a counselor as a ruse to get information, but actually ends up benefitting from the sessions.   CAUTIONS (may contain spoilers) MPAA Rating: R for violence, sexual content, language and nudity  Language/Profanity: 2-3 abuses of the name of God or Jesus; well over 50 variations of the f-word; 'sh-t;' 'a-s,' 'b-tch, 'd-ck,' 'h-ll.' But it's the constant and effusive f-bombs that really unsettle. Sexuality/Nudity: Several couples have sex - in bed, in the shower, in the woods, by open windows - and it's never loving and there is a lot of female nudity; male rear nudity; a woman pulls up her dress and proceeds to touch herself in front of her therapist; multiple affairs and reference to many more; a woman stumbles outside naked after a bath; a woman attempts to perform oral sex on a man who refuses - she sucks on his finger instead; we're told a character was fired because he couldn't 'keep it in his pants.' Violence/Frightening/Intense: For a 'thriller,' there aren't many frightening moments or jump scares, but there is plenty of violent and threatening behavior. Married couples fight, argue, throw things and swing golf clubs at each other, breaking mirrors and more; a man pushes a woman and bloodies her with his keychain; a woman is murdered by being pushed, kicked and bludgeoned with a rock; a man grabs a woman by the face and speaks threateningly; a woman fantasizes about grabbing another by the hair and hurting her; a baby is accidentally drowned (body not shown); someone is stabbed in the neck with a corkscrew and there is much blood. Drugs/Alcohol: Rachel is an alcoholic, so she drinks regularly and there are many negative effects; other characters drink beer and throw bottles intimidatingly at the wall; a drink is thrown in a woman's face.   The Bottom Line RECOMMENDED FOR: Clearly there are a lot of folks excited to see this film. My screening was packed. I too read the book last year and thought it could transfer well to the screen. It doesn't, unless you're into feeling burdened by your murder mysteries. The only half-hearted recommendation I can offer is to those cataloguing Emily Blunt's best career performances or couples who want to feel like they don't have it so bad after all. NOT RECOMMENDED FOR: Children, teens, casual viewers, fans of good whodunits (this one gives itself away too soon and too obviously). The Girl on the Train, directed by Tate Taylor, opened in theaters October 7, 2016; available for home viewing January 17, 2017. It runs 112 minutes and stars Emily Blunt, Rebecca Ferguson, Haley Bennett, Justin Theroux, Luke Evans, Allison Janney, Edgar Ramirez, Laura Prepon and Lisa Kudrow. Watch the trailer for The Girl on the Train here.   Shawn McEvoy is the Managing Editor for Crosswalk.com and the co-host of CrosswalkMovies.com's Video Movie Reviews. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-2'); }); if (gptClientWidth >= 992 && gptClientWidth <= 1000000) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-3'); }); Publication date: October 7, 2016 ]]>
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Plugged In4
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The Girl on the Train
    DramaMystery/Suspense We hope this review was both interesting and useful. Please share it with family and friends who would benefit from it as well.Movie ReviewShe rides to nowhere every day. She sits by the window as the train slithers like a snake through city and country, through spring and fall. The sun rises and sets outside, illuminating human stories big and small. Lives begin and end. Love is found and lost. She watches with eyes dulled by drink, mind ruined by grief. Rachel lives by technicality. Like a ghost, she haunts her ancient days, speeding past the lives she knew, the life she wanted. Two houses fly past, side by side. Stately and solid they seem. Rachel's hazy gaze clears as she watches them. They're why she rides the train every day, drinking down details with parched desire. One of them used to be hers. Tom, her ex, lives in the house (her house) still, but he has a new family now. He married his blond mistress, Anna, and she gave him the baby that Rachel never could. Rachel still visits sometimes: uninvited, of course. Unwanted. But she walks by and remembers. She calls the house sometimes, too. Every week? Day? Hour? She doesn't know. She only knows that sometimes she needs to hear his voice. To torture herself more. And the other house … well, that's a mystery, isn't it? She doesn't know the people who live there at all. But she sees them. The girl—another blond, beautiful, young—is an artist, she imagines. The guy is an architect, or maybe a doctor. They hug and kiss on the porch upstairs, flaunting their affections before the passing train. "She's what I lost," Rachel says of the girl. "She's everything I want to be." But then one day, she sees that mysterious woman—that stranger—kissing a man on that porch upstairs. A different man. She's cheating on her husband, Rachel realizes. Rachel, blurred by drinking, turns furious that this woman would toss away such a perfect life. She gets off the train at her familiar stop, her fragmented mind perhaps piecing together a ragged plan. She's overwhelmed with anger, torn open by grief, destroyed by a stranger. They've told her not to come by the house (her house) anymore. They told her to stay away. But she walks—staggers—into her old neighborhood. She slouches toward a tunnel and sees someone running through it, blond and shapely. She knows who it is. Who it must be. "Whore!" Rachel screams. And then— She wakes up the next morning, in her room. There's blood on her clothes. Bruises on her arms. Vomit in her hair. She can't remember anything. But she knows—she knows—something terrible happened. She's right.Positive ElementsAs you might've gathered, Rachel has some issues. But that blackout by the tunnel proves to be the catalyst for helping at least one of them. She goes to an Alcoholics Anonymous meeting and weans herself from the booze. And while she doesn't give up on drinking completely and continues to complicate her life in unnecessary, deeply damaging ways, her newfound semi-sobriety affords Rachel some clarity, a chance to repair some relationships. It eventually gives her the courage to stand up for herself and others. Rachel gets help from others at times. A friend has allowed Rachel to stay in her spare bedroom for two years and has cared for her through Rachel's inebriated fits. A stranger tries to give her a helping hand during one of her blackouts. Elsewhere, a police officer doggedly pursues a horrific case. A psychologist does his best to bring peace to a patient (though violating some ethical rules to do so). Also, we hear about the preciousness of motherhood, though sometimes those messages are cloaked in moments of pain and longing. Spiritual ContentNone.Sexual ContentMegan—the mysterious woman whom Rachel watches from the train—has her own set of issues, one of them being that she has sex with too many people. We see her in intimate relations, sometimes with her husband, sometimes with someone else. She's shown in the shower with her lover, both naked. (Her full-frontal nudity just barely obscured by water and mist; we see his bare backside). They have (partially clothed) sex in the woods. They have sex in front of their window, which Rachel watches from the train. Megan desperately tries to seduce her therapist, pantomiming masturbation during a counseling session and exposing her underwear. She unbuckles pants, sucks on fingers, stands on the porch in just a free-flying robe and her underwear, kissing the man with her. In a flashback, we see her stumble from a bathtub and into the woods, naked. We hear that she lived with a beau when she was 17 for about a year. She calls herself a whore. Anna, the mistress-turned-wife, kisses and caresses husband Tom affectionately. But during their own love-making turn, Anna seems completely uninterested, her body moving but her face impassible. "I actually miss being the other woman," she admits afterward. Infidelity is a huge part of the plot, and we hear (sometimes in crass terms) about various affairs and flings and the inability of some to stay monogamous. Rachel develops a crush on Megan's husband, Scott, gently touching him on the chest as she watches him sleep. She's accused of trying to seduce him. There are also revelations about having children out of wedlock.Recommended ResourceA Chicken's Guide to Talking Turkey With Your Kids About SexKevin LemanEven the bravest parents feel timid about discussing sex with their 8- to 14-year-olds! This resource offers reassuring, humorous, real-life anecdotes along with reliable information to help you with this challenging task.Buy NowViolent Content[Note: Spoilers are contained in the following section.] Megan disappears the night that Rachel blacked out, and she's later found murdered, allegedly killed by a blunt blow to the head. (We see her hand protruding from dead leaves.) Before the death, Rachel admits what she'd like to do to Megan, describing in detail how she'd sneak into the house, grab her by the hair and smash her head again and again. We eventually see this scenario play out in a foggy vision, hearing the skull crack a bit and seeing the blood begin to spatter the floor and cake the dead woman's hair. Someone is hit and falls to the ground, the head hitting a rock. The assailant continues the attack, using that rock and another, until the victim is dead. (The mortal blows aren't shown on screen.) A man smashes a glass into a woman's face, causing her to bleed and fall unconscious. Someone is graphically stabbed in the throat with a corkscrew. A baby accidentally drowns. A man grabs at a woman in a threatening manner. People break mirrors with golf clubs. We hear about the death of Megan's brother. There's talk of someone getting an abortion.Crude or Profane LanguageThe f-word is used about 60 times, while the s-word is uttered about five. God's name is misused twice, and Jesus' name is abused once. We also hear a handful of uses of "a--," "b--ch" and "h---."Drug and Alcohol ContentAs mentioned, Rachel has a serious drinking problem. Small bottles of booze peek out of the satchel she carries. Then, to hide her issues (though it's pretty obvious that she's drunk most of the time), she spikes her water bottle with loads of alcohol. The Girl on the Train doesn't make light of her alcoholism at all. Indeed, if anything, the film gives us a powerful cautionary tale about the dangers of alcohol abuse. Rachel's drinking problem began when she and Tom were unable to have a baby, she later confesses—the sad catalyst that sent their relationship crashing. She recalls blacking out frequently, with Tom telling her what terrible deeds she was guilty of during her drunken throes. Tom seems supportive at first, even when their relationship ends and he marries his mistress. He tries to tolerate Rachel's obsessive behavior and to keep his wife, Anna, calm under the circumstances. But he eventually has enough, telling Rachel that he's not going to protect her anymore. Rachel's kind friend has also had about enough of Rachel's behavior, eventually telling her that she has a few weeks to find another place to live. It's about that time Rachel tries to clean up her act. For a while, she does go to an AA meeting and controls her drinking a bit more. But when Scott offers her a beer during a conversation, she eventually accepts (after initially turning him down). She plays pool in a bar. And when someone asks her if she's been drinking today, her silence confirms that observation. We do, eventually, see Rachel refuse to drink—even in the midst of times of great stress. Other people drink wine and beer.Other Negative ElementsAs mentioned, Rachel wakes up with vomit in her hair. There's also a mess on the floor. People lie and mislead and get embroiled in abusive relationships. A therapist struggles with impropriety. Megan expresses distain for motherhood, rankling at her job as a nanny. "I wash the smell of the baby off me as fast as I can," she admits. Another troubling scene involves someone holding a baby who shouldn't be. ConclusionForeboding trios of women are found throughout ancient mythology and literature. In Shakespeare's Macbeth, three witches foretell the Scottish king's ultimately tragic future. In Greece, it was thought that the three Fates spun out the threads of human life—with Atrapos cutting the thread when the life was done. The three Graeae, or Gray Sisters, held great secrets … but shared just one eye among them. The three women at the heart of The Girl on the Train are, perhaps, a little like the Gray Sisters. Each of them knows secrets and has secrets of her own. But each, in her own way, is blind. Those secrets, and that blindness, play into the mysterious tragedy that unfolds. Most moviegoers are not blind. And the story unfurls before them in full. While the movie leads us through its mystery via a trailing of crumbs, its problematic content comes at us in gratuitous waves. Sex and sexual infidelity are at the core of the story, and we're exposed to plenty of both onscreen. The movie's nudity is inescapable. Its brutality is undeniable. This Train may hold some mysterious intrigue, but the trip is a jarring one. And it, like Rachel's, leads to nowhere.Pro-social ContentObjectionable ContentSummary AdvisoryPlot SummaryChristian BeliefsOther Belief SystemsAuthority RolesProfanity/ViolenceKissing/Sex/HomosexualityDiscussion TopicsAdditional Comments/NotesEpisode Reviews]]>
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Michael Medved1



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The Girl on the Train
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Armond White3
The National Review / OUT



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Female Victims, Male Abusers, Revenge of the Sisters in the Very Boring, Very Politically Correct Girl on the Train
    But André Téchiné’s Being 17 shows how to make a beautiful film about oppression, class, and politics. And Affleck’s latest is pure dreck. The Girl on the Train, last week’s top box-office film, is so thoroughly lousy that it augurs a horrible future for the American movie-going plebiscite. This woman’s revenge story (dramatized in triplicate, with Emily Blunt, Haley Bennett, and Rebecca Ferguson as suburban white women who suffer psychic abuse by a male) promotes perverse “feminist” sisterhood. Their intertwined distress converges in politically correct sentimentality and self-justifying pathos, with trips through voyeurism, prostitution, alcoholism, abortion, and murder. Such ugly, violent, anti-human misandry is so opportune that, naturally, it became both a New York Times best-selling novel and a Hollywood blockbuster. To understand how this trite thriller manipulates cultural sensitivities, retrace the history of its purloined title. In 2009, superb French director André Téchiné beat American filmmakers to social consciousness with a film released in the U.S. as The Girl on the Train (original title: La Fille du RER). Téchiné based his film loosely on the real-life story of a woman who fabricated a story about being the victim of a hate crime committed by black and Arab youths who mistook her for a Jew; starting from this scandal, which rocked France, Téchiné’s film showed how the media’s coverage of the event exploited race, gender, and religious sensitivities. (In the film, even France’s president commented, exposing Europe’s conflicting new attitudes on ethnicity and gender relations.) During a Q&A after the Film Society of Lincoln Center premiere, Téchiné’s screenwriter, Jean-Marie Besset, noted that the story could well have been based on New York’s Tawana Brawley scandal, and the audience gasped. That shock felt by Upper West Side Manhattanites is calmed by The Girl on the Train that opened last week. The film reassuringly escapes into white feminist privilege, utterly divorced from the “diversity” that mainstream movie culture unconvincingly advocates. The story’s Westchester County suburban-commuter locale exposes Hollywood’s unconscious race and class preference and its notable solipsism. As the hysterical divorcée Rachel, Blunt wallows in so much sorrow that her envy of other women never develops into empathy. Director Tate Taylor fractures the three lives and shuffles time sequences in a crude attempt at suspense. He also butchers any possibility of achieving the compassion conveyed in his previous film, the ludicrous civil-rights drama The Help. (function($){ var swapArticleBodyPullAd = function() { if ($('body').hasClass('node-type-articles')) { var $pullAd = $('.story-container .pullad').addClass('mobile-position'); if (window.matchMedia("(min-width: 640px)").matches) { if ($pullAd.hasClass('mobile-position')) { $pullAd .addClass('desktop-position') .insertBefore('.article-ad-desktop-position'); } } else { if ($pullAd.hasClass('mobile-position')) { $pullAd .addClass('mobile-position') .insertBefore('.article-ad-mobile-position'); } } } }; $(window).on('resize', function(){ swapArticleBodyPullAd(); }).resize(); })(jQuery); When Alan Rudolph dealt with female oppression in the murder mystery Mortal Thoughts (1991), he not only guided Demi Moore’s richest characterization; he also reflected deeper social conflicts within the working-class milieu. Taylor’s film is tightly bonded to the white upper-middle-class status quo. Lacking the complexity of Téchiné and Rudolph, Taylor is grisly and mawkish. The closing lines (“Rachel’s right. She’s always right.”) are wheedling proof that Hollywood regards female moviegoers — all moviegoers — as easily susceptible and uncritical. ***** In Téchiné’s new film, Being 17, a white French youth falls in love with an Algerian teenager while contending with adolescent urges and stress that are not all biological. Both boys are outsiders, and while Téchiné wittily acknowledges their physical similarities, their class differences are more intriguing: Damien (Kacey Mottet Klein) is the only child of a doctor and a military officer; Thomas (Corinten Fila) is the adopted child of a farming couple. Global politics, if not pronounced in the story, are still in the air. This makes Being 17 the most perceptive movie I’ve yet seen to deal with Europe’s contemporary turmoil as evident in its characters’ moral lives. (In a Spanish-language class, the boys translate an essay on exile and migration.) A Hollywood film with comparable characters would probably check off partisan points crudely and be full of sloganeering and self-congratulation. But Téchiné’s breezy style is always attentive to nature, weather, and fluctuating emotions. Damien and Thomas do not settle into ideal ideological figures; they (and their parents) are constantly experiencing and learning. Téchiné’s sensitivity honors the benevolence that once moved critics in an earlier era to acclaim Jean Renoir as cinema’s unparalleled humanist. Téchiné matches Renoir’s generosity when Thomas (the adopted Algerian boy) emerges from his lonely fear and cradles his parents’ newborn infant. He’s not caressing another oppressor but realizing an amazed capacity to love an Other — this flip portrays the deepest cultural merging. Téchiné depicts romance as an awakening to desire. In a uniquely Téchiné scene, Thomas and Damien set aside their homework to engage in an intellectual swordfight about the difference between need and desire. One reads Leibniz’s definition of desire as “a willful striving toward a goal” and something that is “particular to mankind.” The other challenges with Plato’s Symposium, in which men find “mutual satiety in their relation.” Even after the boys’ fully shared yet unsettled sexual entanglement, Damien wears a T-shirt emblazoned My Dream Is Alive, which might seem heavy-handed except that his face beams. In addition, Téchiné’s impassioned style visualizes that catch phrase (the French countryside is alive with feeling such as Olivier Assayas failed to convey in his alienated travelogue The Clouds of Sils Maria). Being 17 takes in worldly troubles — a moving Skype conversation between Damien’s parents (Sandrine Kiberlain and Alexis Loret) brings home our allies’ participation in Afghanistan — but it is the film’s personal ardency that raises it to overwhelming beauty. One wonders why Americans do not make films about sex, class, and ethnicity to equivalent effect. ***** In The Accountant, blatancy overtakes sincerity. Ben Affleck plays a CPA on the Asperger’s spectrum but with a special difference: His clients are global terrorists laundering their filthy lucre. They don’t scare this accountant, whose martinet father schooled him in self-defense; plus, his commissions provide him with military-grade weaponry (and a secret stash of original Renoir and Pollock paintings). As absurdly convoluted as The Girl on the Train, this film stays blatantly politically correct, with its subplot about a woman-of-color (Cynthia Addai-Robinson) hunting down the secretive accountant and rising through Treasury Department ranks. Adding more absurdity and routine violence, director Gavin O’Connor eventually gets to his usual Cain-and-Abel theme (like his 2011 Warrior) — all to say nothing useful or new about global politics, sex, class, or ethnicity. Affleck’s morose performance looks like homework for his role in Zack Snyder’s Batman v Superman opus. Except for Snyder, the future of Hollywood movies looks grim. — Armond White is the author of The Resistance: Ten Years of Pop Culture That Shook the World and, most recently, New Position: The Prince Chronicles. ]]>
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  • Ma’s Black-Mammy Stereotypes Capture the Illiberal Spirit
    (”The Girl on the Train” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    In this revenge satire, Octavia Spencer gives Hollywood the cliché it deserves.
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  • Who is the Greatest Gay Filmmaker Alive?
    (”The Girl on the Train” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Armond WhiteMovies In anticipation of André Téchiné’s newest film, Being 17 (opening this week), here’s an introduction to the French cineaste who may be the best gay filmmaker alive—certainly the greatest that mainstream media doesn’t know. That’s because gay filmmakers get celebrated according to the size of their promotional budgets. But Téchiné, who authentically portray gay experience, doesn’t need hype. His deeply pleasurable movies mean he is the hype. Téchiné’s characters—male, female, young, old—all fall into difficult love or sex relationships, struggling to understand themselves within shifting social units. Téchiné covers all gay experience and his nimble, passionate filmmaking holds up over decades of shifting fashions and topical issues. Here’s a four-part syllabus: Politics and Ethnicity: Les Innocents (1987) explored diversity before it became a thing. France’s political and erotic tension ever since its occupation of Algerian recurs in all his films, particularly Far (Loin, 2001). The Heterosexual Matrix: Téchiné addresses the spectrum of sexuality in the male-female romances of Barocco (1976), Rendez-vous (1985), Alice and Martin (1998), Strayed (2003). Each film pursues identity through the ways that fantasy, psychology, creative initiative and history intersect. Life, viewed with gay consciousness, furthering the Visconti, Cocteau, Demy, Fassbinder tradition. The Deneuve Psyche: Catherine Deneuve, France’s glamorous grande dame, is Téchiné’s muse. But she is more than a fag hag. In My Favorite Season (1993), The Girl on the Train (2009), In the Name of My Daughter (2014), Changing Times (2004). Scene of the Crime (1987), and Hotel des Amerique(1981), Big Cat magnifies social and personal desire like such larger-than-life gay icons from Dietrich to Garland, Monroe to Cher. The Masterpieces: I Don’t Kiss (J’embrasse Pas, 1991) - Pierre (Manuel Blanc) leaves the provinces to try acting, escorting, and discovering himself in Paris. Unforgivable (Impardonnables, 2011) - Bisexual Judith (Carole Bouquet) begins an affair with Francis (André Dussollier) whose promiscuous daughter unbalances the middle-aged couple’s stability. The Bronte Sisters (1979) - An experimental bio-pic exploring the interwoven emotional ties of the legendary literary family. A sumptuous costume drama with gorgeous stars: Isabelle Adjani as Emily, Isabelle Huppert as Anne, Marie-France Pisier as Charlotte; Pascal Greggory as their brother Branwell, and Roland Barthes (Téchiné’s mentor) as Thackery.  Thieves (Les Voleurs, 1996) - Téchiné’ transposes Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury onto a bisexual triangle between Deneuve, Daniel Auteuil, and Laurence Cote—a sensual, intellectual advance on Sunday, Bloody Sunday as Téchiné ingeniously splits time and memory. French Provincial (Souvenirs d’en France, 1975) - A 75-year family epic told in 90 minutes. A patriarchy becomes a matriarchy headed by Jeanne Moreau, while each decade reflects the ongoing history of movie genres. This was Téchiné’s American debut and his knowledge of high and low culture makes, perhaps, his most dazzling film. The Witnesses (Les Temoins, 2007) - The AIDS-era as felt by survivors who recall Manu (Johann Libereau), a country boy who becomes a hustler; his affair with Medhi (Sami Bouajila) changes the lives of an interracial middle-class family.  Wild Reeds (Les Roseaux Sauvages, 1995) - Still the greatest of all coming-of-age films, Téchiné follows four teenagers caught-up in the tumult of rock-n-roll, movies, politics, and sexual discovery. Best friends Francois (Gael Morel) and Maite (Elodie Bouchez) are both attracted to Serge (Stephane Rideau), the working-class rival of bourgeois conservative Henri (Frederic Gorny). Raw emotion in nature and changing society seen with nostalgia and generosity of a great filmmaker’s open-spirit. ]]>
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Quintus Curtius1
Fortress of the Mind



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Sunday Movie Roundup (3/26/2017)

    Here are the latest results and post-mortems.  All in all, it was a great week.

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PJ Media Staff1
PJ Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)


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