Paranoia

Not rated yet!
Director
Robert Luketic
Runtime
1 h 46 min
Release Date
14 August 2013
Genres
Drama, Thriller
Overview
An entry-level employee at a powerful corporation finds himself occupying a corner office, but at a dangerous price: he must spy on his boss's old mentor to secure for him a multi-billion dollar advantage.
Staff ReviewsAround the Web ReviewsAudience Reviews

Check back soon when the reviews are out!

Or why not join our mailing list to stay up to date?

 

SIGN UP!

Box office recaps sent twice a month (maximum).

( ̄^ ̄)ゞ (☞゚ヮ゚)☞ No spam! ☜(゚ヮ゚☜)




 ✍🏻  > 🗡️   Want to join our team? Email us!  
Plugged In1
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Paranoia
    DramaMystery/SuspenseAction/Adventure We hope this review was both interesting and useful. Please share it with family and friends who would benefit from it as well.Movie ReviewAdam Cassidy knows that down the road he's destined for great things in the tech world. But in the here and now he's just destined to be desperate. His employer of six years, the cellphone colossus Wyatt Corporation, has just slashed his insurance coverage. That means his aging father's last three trips to the hospital for ongoing heart issues will have to come out of Adam's pocket—to the tune of $40 grand. But he's got a plan. Along with his four teammates at Wyatt, he's dreamed up a new synthesis of mobile phones and social media that allows users to project all of their data onto any screen in their house. He's convinced that the big man himself, Nicolas Wyatt, will think it's the best idea the company's ever had. Wyatt doesn't. And Adam's smart-mouthed rejoinder after the failed product pitch earns him and his entire team pink slips. So what better way to stick it to the man one last time than a raucous night on the town (followed by drunken casual sex) … all on the corporate credit card. Wyatt isn't amused with the $16,000 tab Adam and his pals rack up in one wild night. But he has a grudging appreciation for the young man's reckless, unthinking abandon. And so he offers Adam a choice: either suffer prosecution for credit card fraud or net a cool $500,000, plus another million in stock options by spying on Wyatt Corp's chief rival, Eikon (which is headed by Wyatt's old mentor and now antagonist in chief, Jock Goddard). The techie grail? Stealing a forthcoming, game-changing phone prototype. You know, the one locked away in a biometrically protected vault on the 38th floor of Eikon's HQ in NYC. Oh, and as for the aforementioned casual sex Adam scrounged up? Well, the hottie he hooked up with is none other than Emma Jennings, Eikon's head of marketing���which simultaneously makes his corporate espionage assignment easier and more difficult as their inevitable romance heats up. But that's not the only thing heating up. Inching up almost as fast is the grim temperature of Nicolas Wyatt's threats against Adam, Adam's father and Adam's friends should the newly minted mole mess up his malevolent mission.Positive ElementsWe easily see here how Adam's very bad choice to misuse a corporate credit card leaves him vulnerable to Wyatt's blackmailing. And we also see how Adam's motivations slowly change once he's trapped. At first it's all about moi as he embraces the material excess and privilege that come with his new position. As the stakes increase, however, Adam is increasingly struck by his need to protect his father and friends from Wyatt's ever-more-ominous hints about what might happen to them if the ball gets dropped. He's still trying to do something illegal, of course, but his main reason for doing so becomes much more self-sacrificing than self-absorbed. Accustomed to belittling and berating his father, Adam is also eventually humbled in this area, recanting his barbed words and saying to his dad, "Did I ever tell you you were right about everything? I'm sorry I didn't listen to you." He adds, "One way to remember who you are is to remember who your heroes are," and it's clear that his father is now at the top of that list. Also in the mix is an FBI agent named Gamble, whom Adam initially spurns … but then helps nail the corporate criminal(s) he's pursuing. And with regard to his career and materialistic dreams, Adam finally admits, "Things I thought I wanted don't seem so important anymore." He insists to Emma, "I do know right from wrong. I'm sorry it took me so long to act on it. … I hope one day I can make things right." Paranoia also makes some cautionary statements about the omnipresence of technology and our overdependence on it. Hyperbolic yet very real concerns over privacy issues are front and center too as Adam increasingly realizes how much of his life is being tracked.Spiritual ContentSexual ContentAdam and Emma share a steamy, suggestive dance before the scene transitions to him shirtless in her empty bed the next morning. (He has to ask her if they had sex because he was too drunk to remember. And it's implied that Emma regularly hooks up with attractive men she has no intention of pursuing a relationship with.) Later, they share a series of passionate kisses before ending up in bed again. This time the ensuing scene involves passionate embraces and shows bare backs while they're in the process of intercourse. A guy brags about having sex with a girl. Adam says he suspects his father has a sexual relationship with his home nurse. Adam is repeatedly shown shirtless, and a long scene features him wearing only a towel after getting out of the shower. We also see him twice wearing boxer shorts. Emma's outfits reveal cleavage. A shower scene shows her arm.Recommended ResourceA Chicken's Guide to Talking Turkey With Your Kids About SexKevin LemanEven the bravest parents feel timid about discussing sex with their 8- to 14-year-olds! This resource offers reassuring, humorous, real-life anecdotes along with reliable information to help you with this challenging task.Buy NowViolent ContentWe hear talk of a hit man and see bloody black-and-white crime scene photos of victims. That hit man later puts a gun to Adam's head. (Adam slugs him and escapes.) Wyatt says in no uncertain terms that he'll kill Adam's father and friends if the young corporate spy fails. And he punctuates his threats by having one of those friends run down with a car, breaking the guy's leg and bruising his face. A lengthy foot pursuit has Adam running through a restaurant, knocking shelves over behind him to block the path.Crude or Profane LanguageOne f-word. Half-a-dozen s-words. There are two or three misuses of God's name (one paired with "d‑‑n"), along with one abuse of Jesus'. "A‑‑," "h‑‑‑" and "p‑‑‑" are each uttered several times. "B‑‑tard" is used once.Drug and Alcohol ContentAdam and his crew get very drunk after getting fired, downing very expensive liquor. (Cîroc is mentioned by name.) We watch as they knock back alcohol from mugs, shot glasses and bottles. Several other scenes depict characters drinking wine or champagne socially. And Allison gets a job as a bartender, prompting several scenes at the bar where she works. Adam says that even though his father is slowly succumbing to emphysema and congestive heart failure, the older man refuses to quit smoking cigars (and we see him with one in his mouth). Somebody else is shown smoking a cigar too.Other Negative ElementsLying, stealing and hacking are all part and parcel of Adam's spying. And as the story unspools, it becomes clear that he's not the only one who's pretending to be something he's not. Wyatt's rationalization for it all? A quote he attributes to Picasso: "A good artist copies. A great artist steals. There's nothing original. We're all stealing."ConclusionParanoia is a standard-issue corporate thriller with the requisite twists and turns—both in the plot and in the main character's growing sense of morality and personal responsibility. And if there's anything more to be said about the subject, it's that this particular iteration of the genre plays out in some compelling ways against the thematic backdrop of technology's increasingly prominent role in our lives. Mainstream critics have unleashed the heavy artillery in their drubbing of the film, mostly arguing that aesthetically it's boringly derivative of similar stories that have come before (like, say, The Firm). But Plugged In's concerns land more on the moral and ethical end of the spectrum. I appreciated Adam Cassidy's growth as a person, especially his realization that perhaps his humble, faithful father offered him a better example to follow than he at first is able to see. Still, when Adam eventually tells Emma that he now "know[s] right from wrong," it's clear such knowledge doesn't branch out into the couple's premarital sexual entanglement—a connection that began very casually for both of them. Onscreen, this sort of relationship—one that began as a fling with no further thought of ongoing commitment—is treated as perfectly normal behavior and not worthy of a second thought. Paranoia, then, sharply critiques dishonesty and greed as moral failings worthy of censure and punishment, even as it reinforces our culture's morality-detached ways of thinking—or not thinking at all—about the role and place of sexuality in relationships. Pro-social ContentObjectionable ContentSummary AdvisoryPlot SummaryChristian BeliefsOther Belief SystemsAuthority RolesProfanity/ViolenceKissing/Sex/HomosexualityDiscussion TopicsAdditional Comments/NotesEpisode Reviews]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Kyle Smith1
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Review: "Paranoia"
    I’d called “Paranoia” a sub-Grisham corporate thriller but that would imply that Grisham is good. My review is up.]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Debbie Schlussel1
The New York Post



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Wknd Box Office: Jobs, Lee Daniels’ The Butler, Kick-Ass 2, Paranoia
    Blog Posts Movie Reviews Lee Daniels’ The Butler“: Two-and-a-half extremely tedious hours of race merchant grievance theater, prefaced by a gazillion previews filled with race merchant grievance theater movie trailers (a Mandela movie, some Brad Pitt movie about a free Black man kidnapped and forced to be a slave, and so on–I thought I was gonna be beaten by the others in the entirely Black audience when a trailer popped up for the Tom Hanks movie in which he plays the captain of the ship hijacked by Somalian Islamic terrorists). Yes, slavery and horrible treatment of Blacks happened. It’s a fact of American history, and there’s no denying it. But I felt I was being lectured to. I felt like this movie was a continuing campaign commercial for Barack Obama (and it is–he’s the only President treated with absolute respect and gushing in this movie, even though he’s not portrayed in any speaking roles or by any actors here). And I felt like here is yet another movie in which the N-word is used to bait modern-day Black Americans who see it to justify the anti-White racism that dominates that community and endless affirmative action, minority set-asides and other race-based government unfairness as “payback.” If your mind isn’t filled with enough “visions” of Oprah scowling and pretending to talk Ebonics, then this is your movie. For everyone else, it’s waaaaaay toooooo loooooong and self-indulgent, and it tries to be at once a catalog of the civil rights movement AND the Black Forest Gump (in the sense that every important event in the civil rights movement and every President’s reaction to it either touches the butler who is the lead in this movie or his son). Oh, and the narrative is that Blacks who work hard and try to make it in America–like the Black butler in the White House–are taking the wrong tack, and that Black militance and supremacy is better. And while the movies is supposed to be based on the true story of former White House butler, Eugene Allen, it’s mostly fiction. Among the few things the real life butler Allen and the one in this movie had in common: they both were White House butlers, both grew up on a plantation, and they were both Black. The rest is made up to rile emotions, not all of them positive. The story: Cecil Gaines (Forest Whitaker) is treated like a slave, as are his parents (his mom is Mariah Carey). His father is shot dead by the White plantation owner’s son after the son rapes Gaines’ mother and Gaines asks his father to say something. Gaines is raised to be a “housen—er” by the plantation owner (the loathsome fan of Islamic terrorists, Vanessa Redgrave), and ultimately leaves the plantation, getting a job at a local hotel, where the Black head butler teachers him how to serve people. Then, he works at a Washington, DC hotel, where he is recommended and chosen for a job as a White House butler. He is married to Oprah Winfrey, an alcoholic whiner who is hit on by their neighbor. They have two sons. One serves in Vietnam and is killed there. The other son is a Black militant and joins the Black Panthers. All his life, the militant son is involved in civil rights protests and marches and gets arrested and beaten. While the butler is distant from his son–because he disapproves of his son’s radicalism and believes in hard work and going along with the White men in the White House–he ultimately regrets that choice, quits working at the White House, and joins his son at a protest against apartheid at the South African Embassy. Several actors play the various Presidents (Robin Williams is a convincing Harry Truman, Liev Schreiber is Lyndon Johnson, and so on), but the President most unfairly maligned is Ronald Reagan (played by Palestinian terrorist fan Alan Rickman, who looks and sounds NOTHING like Reagan). Although the movie shows that Reagan is the only President who finally got involved and made sure the Black White House servants were paid the same as their White counterparts and considered for promotions, it is an invitation by the Reagans to the butler and his wife that spurs the butler to hate the Reagans and his life at the White House, to do a 180 and quit his job, and to support his son’s militance. He says that he and his wife were only invited to the dinner so that they could be shown off as “Black Reagan friends” at a time that Reagan opposed sanctions against South Africa’s apartheid regime. But there is no evidence of that. In real life, Eugene Allen’s son served in Vietnam, but came home alive. In reality, his wife was not an annoying drunk like Oprah (thankfully for him!). He did NOT have a militant Black Panther son, and was not spurred into protesting at the South African Embassy or quitting in disgust at the Reagans. That was all baloney. Just made up to bolster race merchant grievance theater a la Oprah. Slate has a great summary of what is and isn’t true in the life story of Allen versus what’s in this movie. A few other things on Reagan. The movie shows Reagan telling the butler that he secretly sends money to people who write the White House telling of their financial troubles, and he asks the butler to help him continue the practice in secret after Reagan’s staff and Nancy (Hanoi Hilton Jane Fonda) want it stopped. That was nice. The movie also shows Nancy telling the staff that there are too many conservatives on foreign policy surrounding her husband and she wants more moderates surrounding him so that they can thaw the Cold War with the Soviets. But the real life Nancy Reagan was a staunch anti-Communist when she met Ronald Reagan and got him interested in her politics and politics in general. Yes, she was a liberal on social issues, but not the Cold War, so this simply isn’t accurate. Also, when it comes to civil rights, I had a personal experience with President Reagan on this. I met the President several times, and when I first met him in 1986 (or ’87), I asked him a question about affirmative action, how unfair it was, and when he’d get rid of it in government and public universities. He responded with a non-answer, telling me how he deplored racism and anti-Semitism, and how he was fired (or quit) as a lifeguard after standing up for Blacks and Jews where he was lifeguarding. In any event, aside from being complete fiction (which unfortunately people will believe is a true story of an actual Black White House butler), “The Butler” is just long, boring, tiresome, and way too damned didactic. The best I can say about this movie is that the costuming/wardrobe is fabulous. For everything else, no thank you. THREE JESSE JACKSONS PLUS THREE AL SHARPTONS PLUS TWO OBAMAS ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Want even more consensus?

Skip Rotten Tomatoes, they’re biased SJWs too afraid to criticize things like the Ghost Busters reboot. Avoid giving them ad revenue by using the minimalist alternative, Cinesift, for a quick aggregate:

 🗣️ Know of another conservative review that we’re missing?
Leave a link in the comments below or email us!  

What’d you think? Let us know with a video:

Record a webcam review!

Or anonymous text review:

Submit your review
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
Submit
     
Cancel

Create your own review

Average rating:  
 0 reviews
Overall Hollywood Bs Average rating:  
 
Anti-patriotism Average rating:  
 
Misandry Average rating:  
 
Affirmative action Average rating:  
 
LGBTQ rstuvwxyz Average rating:  
 
Anti-God Average rating:  
 

Buy on Amazon:
⚠️  Comment freely, but please respect our young users.
👍🏻 Non PC comments/memes/vids/links 
👎🏻  Curse words / NSFW media / JQ stuff
👌🏻 Visit our 18+  free speech forum to avoid censorship.
⚠️ Keep your kids’ websurfing safe! Read this.

Share this page:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail