Once

Not rated yet!
Director
John Carney
Runtime
1 h 25 min
Release Date
23 March 2007
Genres
Drama, Music, Romance
Overview
A vacuum repairman moonlights as a street musician and hopes for his big break. One day a Czech immigrant, who earns a living selling flowers, approaches him with the news that she is also an aspiring singer-songwriter. The pair decide to collaborate, and the songs that they compose reflect the story of their blossoming love.
Staff ReviewsAround the Web ReviewsAudience Reviews

Check back soon when the reviews are out!

Or why not join our mailing list to stay up to date?

 

SIGN UP!

Box office recaps sent twice a month (maximum).

( ̄^ ̄)ゞ (☞゚ヮ゚)☞ No spam! ☜(゚ヮ゚☜)




 ✍🏻  > 🗡️   Want to join our team? Email us!  
Kyle Smith11
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Review: "Once"
    LYRICAL Kyle Smith review of “ONCE” Running time: 88 minutes/ R (profanity). What “Rent” should have been, “Once” is: a Bohemian rhapsody. A Dublin street musician (Glen Hansard) is strumming his youth away for spare change when along comes a girl with smiling eyes (Marketa Irglova) to listen and ask, “Who’d you write the song for?” Nobody, he says, and besides, he’s already over her. The guy and the girl don’t seem to possess names, or anything else. He works in his father’s shop repairing Hoovers, and she sells single roses. But when they go to a music store together, she plays the piano to his guitar and beauty fills the air. They’re so sweet together that it’s obvious nothing can part them. Yet, on a trip to his bathroom-size apartment, something does. She comes away angry and he confused. He’s been dumped by his girlfriend – he tells the tale in his song, “Oh broken-hearted Hoover-fixing sucker guy,” and she’s a Czech who shares her flat with a baby, a mom and three guys from next door who seem permanently affixed to her rotting sofa. Visiting the guy and his dad in their equally squalid repair shop, the girl says, “Your son is a very talented man, sir.” “He should be,” replies the father, as he tinkers with a machine. “I trained him myself.” Things get brighter for her, anyway: She tells the guy brightly, “I got a job in a big house – cleaning!” As they play their Coldplay-style ballads to each other, hints of their feelings keep peeking out of the lyrics, but these may be emotional leftovers from previous affairs. Scenes with little or no dialogue – the guy looking at videos of his ex-girlfriend – are poetry, and a ride on a motorcycle has the unexpected niceness and disarming simplicity of the classic French New Wave romance “A Man and a Woman.” The near-continuous stream of storytelling in song, though, works like a slacker opera, a scruffy “Umbrellas of Cherbourg.” Writer-director John Carney’s movie is so heartfelt and sparse, so quietly genuine with its dingy digital images – so not “Rent” – that it’s unsurprising to learn that both Hansard, the singer for the band the Frames, and Irglova both performed their own songs. The guy and the girl may or may not fall in love with each other, but in the audience the only discussion will be about which one is more adorable.]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Best Song and Score Nominees Evidently Picked by My Mom
    (”Once” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The three truly great music scores this year–from “Into the Wild,” “There Will Be Blood” and “Once” earned a total of only a single nomination, for “Falling Slowly,” from “Once.” (Technicalities hung up the other two movies.) The top six songs from “Once” were better than anything from “Enchanted.” What is with that final “Enchanted” nominee, the 1986-ish lite-FM number? To call it generic would be to promote it. And…”Once,” which I put at no. 2 on my top ten best films of the year list, and should have been nominated for Best Picture and Director, wins Best Original Song for the gorgeous ballad “Falling Slowly.” Great moment when Glen Hansard of The Frames accepts the Oscar. But then as his costar, cowriter and girlfriend Marketa Irglova, who was beyond charming in the movie, steps to the microphone for what should have been one of the really genuine bits of the show, Bill Conti’s orchestra cuts her off. Because, like, we need to look at more montages. Unbefreakinglievable. UPDATE: Stewart is bringing her out! Stewart, you’re my hero. All of your lapses are forgiven. “Fair play to those who dream and don’t give up,” says Irglova. Lovely. Now everyone: rent “Once.” It’s a thing of beauty. If it doesn’t make you cry, your tear ducts are not operational. (I initially gave it 3.5 stars in this review because it’s such a little movie, but after seeing it three times, I am convinced that I significantly underrated it the first time around.)]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • The Ten Best Movies of 2007
    (”Once” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    In today’s Post, my expert colleague Lou “the Encyclopedia” Lumenick and I jawbone over the year’s ten best movies. (I can’t explain the strangely mangled editing on the website at the end of the piece.) My list: 1. The Diving Bell and the Butterfly 2. Once 3. Knocked Up 4. Into the Wild 5. Superbad 6. Ratatouille 7. No Country for Old Men 8. The Lives of Others 9. Margot at the Wedding 10. Meet the Robinsons]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Midterms: Top Ten Movies of 2007
    (”Once” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Looking back over the first half of this year–which, judging by the past, will yield nowhere near half of the year’s worthwhile movies–I can’t agree with those who say movies have lost it. There are more bad movies these days, and more mediocre ones, and more brilliant ones. The movie industry is awash with outside financing, so there is more of everything, from blockbusters on down to independent films about Parisian conversation. Here are my picks for the ten best films of January-June. It wouldn’t be a bad list for an entire year. 1. The Lives of Others–Germany’s bitterly ironic film about East Germany behind the Berlin Wall, is considered a 2006 work by the Motion Picture Academy, which gave it the Best Foreign Film award at this year’s Oscars, but it wasn’t released in the U.S. until this year. A complex, mature, heartbreaking film about what all-pervasive spying did to people, it is perhaps the best ever made about life behind the Iron Curtain in Europe. Netflix it now; it comes out on DVD August 21. 2. Knocked Up–Hilarious all the way through, but it also gets at some truths about sex, marriage, aging, and raising kids.  3. Ratatouille–You can practically smell and taste this animatedÃbillet-doux about fine dining. 4. Rescue Dawn–A film to cheer, about a crushproof American pilot (the indispensable Christian Bale) who was crazy enough to try to escape from the Pathet Lao who shot him down on a secret mission over Laos in 1965. 5. Meet the Robinsons–Disney’s brilliantly constructed time-travel comedy is invigorated with a sense of awe at human progress and hope for the future. 6. Once–A simple but glorious love story told largely with music, about an Irish street musician and a girl who stops to listen to him play. Sublime. 7. La Vie en Rose–A bio of French singer Edith Piaf (an astonishing Marion Cotillard), told in shards of memory as she looks back over a short and mistake-filled life. The way the film presents “Je Ne Regrette Rien” at the climax is majestic.  8. Zodiac–A cop and two newspapermen struggle to solve a string of murders in the San Francisco area in the early 1970s. Their story is essentially one of frustration, but David Fincher’s imaginative direction and rich evocation of the era keep you holding your breath throughout. It’s available on DVD. 9. 28 Weeks Later–A consistently terrifying zombie movie that makes you feel like you are in the middle of the action. Director Juan Carlos Fresnadillo is going to make a big name for himself; I found his vision of a depopulated London even more unnerving than the similarly apocalyptic “Children of Men.” 10. “Reign Over Me” and “Paris Je T’Aime.” The Adam Sandler drama “Reign Over Me” is thorny but unusual and involving, a story of a guy who resists therapy or even normal human contact in the wake of the death of his family on 9/11. Instead, he obsessively remodels his kitchen and listens to loud Springsteen and The Who. I like the way the film resists the need to provide a solution for him. “Paris Je T’Aime,” a collection of short films from top directors such as the Coen Brothers and Alexander Payne, tries to do nothing less than capture Paris on film by looking at it from many perspectives, and though not every episode pays off, most of them achieve real feeling, especially the one by Payne at the end, about a middle-aged postal worker quietly discovering herself in the city.]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Best Films of the Decade
    (”Once” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lou Lumenick and I name our ten favorite films of the decade in today’s Post. My list starts with “A.I. Artificial Intelligence,” an entrancing and perfectly structured epic fairy tale with a sweep as broad as time. My list: 1. A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001) 2. United 93 (2006) 3. Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003) 4. The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007) 5. Batman Begins (2005) 6. Amelie (2001) 7. Once (2007) 8. Team America: World Police (2004) 9. Inglourious Basterds (2009) 10. Almost Famous (2000)]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Sundance Sensation Bombs
    (”Once” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The “buzzed-about” documentary “Catfish” was a sensation — the sensation, really — at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. I’d never attended the fest before this year, but from sea level it looked to me as if a lot of the most-hyped films that came out of the fest were unspeakably awful bombs (like “Happy, Texas”) and that a lot of the hits that came down from the Utah mountains (like “The Full Monty” and “Once”) were barely noticed by the chunky-glasses industry types who bustle confidently through Park City. I couldn’t quite figure out how to work “Catfish” into my schedule at Sundance (and I think documentaries in general are ignored by everyone but critics and industry types), but when I finally saw it in Manhattan I was underwhelmed by the movie — even as I was awed by the marketing blitz. Rogue Pictures, a division of Universal, was holding so many “buzz-building” freebie screenings for selected hipsters, and the town was plastered with so many advertisements for the movie, that it was almost as if Rogue considered the film a commercial property on a par with a studio film. The press played along, with excitable magazine writers deeming this irredeemably non-mind-blowing film mindblowing. The movie has one “twist,” if you can call it that, which is pretty evident after 40 minutes. The audience didn’t bite. “Catfish,” which reportedly sold for $1.5 million, not including many millions more that were evidently spent on advertising and marketing, is nearing the end of its box office run. Its final gross looks like it’s going to be about $3 million. In buying the hype created by a small group of people who do not, to put it mildly, speak for the taste of ordinary Americans, Universal bought itself the right to lose money. ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Coming Soon: The 25 Best Films of the Year
    (”Once” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    As soon as I have a chance to sort and mull–which did I like better, “28 Weeks Later” or “The Bucket List”? I’ll post my top 25 movies of the year. Hint: “Once” (above with Marketa Irglova and Glen Hansard) will be on it. See my review here. Giving it 3.5 stars instead of 4 might be my biggest regret of the year, reviewing-wise. ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

PJ Media Staff1
PJ Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The 10 Best Films of the 2000s
    Lifestyle  10. Almost Famous (2000)Cameron Crowe’s reflection on his years as a teen Rolling Stone correspondent has all the warmth, directness and immediacy of a candid first novel -- but, critically, Crowe didn’t make it until many years later, giving the film an additional layer of bittersweet nostalgia and emotional depth. The film wriggles with youth and echoes with maturity at the same time.   class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2014/7/5/the-10-best-films-of-the-2000s/ previous Page 1 of 9 next   ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Kelly Jane Torrance1
The Weekly Standard



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • MOVIES: In search of indie romance
    (”Once” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    If "In Search of a Midnight Kiss" were writer-director Alex Holdridge's first film, I would say it was a pretty promising debut. The black-and-white film is studded with beautifully composed shots and flashes of wit and humor. It's Mr. Holdridge's third film, though, and an experienced filmmaker should offer us more than just brief glimpses of talent. Published August 29, 2008

    ...
    (Review Source)

Want even more consensus?

Skip Rotten Tomatoes, they’re biased SJWs too afraid to criticize things like the Ghost Busters reboot. Avoid giving them ad revenue by using the minimalist alternative, Cinesift, for a quick aggregate:

 🗣️ Know of another conservative review that we’re missing?
Leave a link in the comments below or email us!  

What’d you think? Let us know with a video:

Record a webcam review!

Or anonymous text review:

Submit your review
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
Submit
     
Cancel

Create your own review

Average rating:  
 0 reviews
Overall Hollywood Bs Average rating:  
 
Anti-patriotism Average rating:  
 
Misandry Average rating:  
 
Affirmative action Average rating:  
 
LGBTQ rstuvwxyz Average rating:  
 
Anti-God Average rating:  
 

Buy on Amazon:
⚠️  Comment freely, but please respect our young users.
👍🏻 Non PC comments/memes/vids/links 
👎🏻  Curse words / NSFW media / JQ stuff
👌🏻 Visit our 18+  free speech forum to avoid censorship.
⚠️ Keep your kids’ websurfing safe! Read this.

Share this page:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail