Olympus Has Fallen

Not rated yet!
Director
Antoine Fuqua
Runtime
2 h 00 min
Release Date
20 March 2013
Genres
Action, Thriller
Overview
When the White House (Secret Service Code: "Olympus") is captured by a terrorist mastermind and the President is kidnapped, disgraced former Presidential guard Mike Banning finds himself trapped within the building. As the national security team scrambles to respond, they are forced to rely on Banning's inside knowledge to help retake the White House, save the President and avert an even bigger disaster.
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  • The Hollow Empire Olympus Has Fallen
    olympus-has-fallen-poster-aaron-eckhart

    [1]3,363 words

    “He admires England because she is strong, but does not love her because she is English,” said G. K. Chesterton of Rudyard Kipling. The love of the nation (and the racial roots of any real nation) does not come from rational calculation, but from the mystical impulses behind love, the same kind of love most people feel for their parents or children. Chesterton contended that empire requires rationalization and justification – you can admire an empire, but never really love it.

    Olympus Has Fallen is America’s answer. You can love the empire, the President, and the institutions of state in the same way real patriots once loved their peoples, cultures, and communities. After all, America has nothing left. The corpse of the once existing American nation sits enthroned at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, and the few authentic American patriots still bow before the throne.

    Olympus Has Fallen is an apology for an American version of monarchy, an intense and irrational loyalty to the person of the President (and his family) as such. The film stars Gerard Butler as Secret Service Agent Mike Banning, a member of the President’s personal guard. However, rather than a bodyguard, he’s almost a courtier and confidante to President Benjamin Asher (Aaron Eckhart) and the First Lady. He also serves as a kind of (very) big brother to their young son Connor. Connor looks up to Banning, and wants to be in the Secret Service himself one day. In return, Banning makes sure Connor knows every possible security feature of the White House.

    Ashley Judd called in a favor so she could play the First Lady. She plans a run for the Senate so she can deconstruct her home state of Kentucky. Unfortunately, her botched [2] plastic surgery, puffy features, and (literal) inability to portray emotion make her a poor choice as First Lady. Fortunately for the viewer, and unfortunately for the Banning and the First Family, she’s only on screen for a short time.

    The Presidential limousine crashes off a road in a snowstorm and hangs precariously off a precipice. While agents desperately jump on the back of the car to try to salvage it, Banning manages to save the President, but can’t cut the First Lady free in time. She plummets to her death, before the horrified eyes of her husband and son. Some agents die too, but who cares? Banning is removed from the President’s guard and relegated to a desk job at the Treasury Department.

    Reduced to an office drone, disgraced in the eyes of the people he swore to protect, and all but indifferent to his own girlfriend, Banning gets a chance at salvation when a massive terrorist attack from air and land captures the White House. The last dying White House Secret Service agent reports, “Olympus Has Fallen” to the shocked national security team, and Mike Banning is the only live asset they have left in the building. It won’t ruin much for you to say that over the next few hours, Banning will rack up an impressive body count, shooting, stabbing, and torturing his away to the mastermind who has seized the President.

    The formulaic plot should not detract from anyone seeing the film. The attack scene is shocking (if ludicrously unlikely) and tactically interesting. The body count is impressive, the scenes are well shot, and it’s gratifying to see Butler return to form as an action hero after wasting time in romantic comedies for a few years.

    However, the real meaning of these kinds of films lie in the background of the story and the reaction of the audience. As far as the reception of the hoi polloi is concerned, Olympus Has Fallen has been surprisingly successful [3]. It has brought in tens of millions of dollars more than expected and is being driven by strong word of mouth. Part of this is simply because it is a competently executed and exciting thriller. However, what is more interesting is that the film managed to be a success through skillful marketing to the o [4]lder, male, military, and presumably white demographic [4], including pre-release screenings at military bases.

    To add further intrigue, there is a far more expensive and well promoted film coming out entitled White House Down [5], which essentially has the same plot. However, in this recounting, Jamie Foxx, fresh from s [6]laughtering White Southerners [6], is a President fit for the Age of Obama, with Channing Tatum as the white rescuer. Though it’s too easy to say, early indications reveal that White House Down will be marketed as a traditional Hollywood blockbuster, which means pitching the younger and more “vibrant” denizens of these States United. Despite not being a major studio release, Olympus Has Fallen stole a march on the upcoming White House Down by courting an audience Hollywood traditionally despises.

    So how did they do it? The film opens with a militaristic drum beat and shots of the American flag waving. When we see Washington DC, the camera lingers lovingly on Marines with brightly polished brass, heavily armored security toting assault rifles, and convoys of limos racing through the streets. The national security state is adored without irony, and somewhere you can imagine Justin Raimondo [7] grinding his teeth in rage about this sentimental picture of military power.

    A glimpse of some of the movie posters [8] might lead one to think Morgan Freeman was reenacting his role as President from Deep Impact [9]. (In passing, how innovative a black President seemed in 1998, as if they were preparing us for something . . .)

    The marketing is misleading. Olympus Has Fallen takes us back to the “Real America,” with the WASPy President Asher serving as Head of State. Eckhart’s President Asher conducts himself like a solider, all grim determination, brusque gestures, and square-jawed integrity. Furthermore, the government operates as if he was Napoleon – with government officials constantly bowing and scraping before their militaristic monarch before crisply delivering briefings on the security situation, be it at the White House or in North Korea. There appear to be no other issues.

    There is a brief mention of having to attend a “billionaires” party in order to raise money for re-election, but the President despises the necessity and other than that, no one mentions politics. We never find out what party he’s in, or what kinds of policies he favors. He’s just an all-American hero, a symbol of the entire nation. He resembles nothing so much as a later Roman Emperor, a legionary promoted to the purple by acclaim of the troops.

    Morgan Freeman is simply the Speaker of the House, elevated to acting President after the President and Vice-President are captured (with the latter executed with almost no reaction from anyone). As befits a commoner, he has a more modest approach to leadership. Before issuing crisp orders to deal with the crisis, he gives detailed instructions about what kind of coffee he wants.

    Surprisingly, Freeman is not the super-intelligent Numinous Negro President that magically saves the day. There is the required scene where he pulls rank on the white male overaggressive Army general. However, he still orders in failed rescue operations, seems unsure of what to do throughout most of the film, and ultimately gives in to all the terrorists’ demands. It takes Banning, the man whose only job is to guard the President’s life, to remind the Speaker that the country’s interests are far more important than one man’s life. Unsurprisingly, this doesn’t sway the Speaker. The sacred person of the real President is more important than all else.

    And what do the terrorists want? As you have probably guessed, the villains are North Koreans [10] – just in time for increased media coverage of tensions with that nation. The leader of the group, Kang Yeonsak, is an impressive specimen who has orchestrated the sophisticated White House takeover to force America to abandon South Korea. The very first thing that Kang does is televise his execution of the South Korean Prime Minister to the American national security team. Incredibly, the Speaker/Acting President agrees to evacuate American troops and the Seventh Fleet in order to save the President’s life, seemingly indifferent to the millions of other lives this decision will cost.

    While the North Koreans have an obvious motivation, they also have the help of an American traitor, one Dave Forbes, a former Secret Service agent who has joined the South Korean Prime Minister’s detail in order to betray him. When President Asher asks the obvious question as to why Forbes turned his cloak, the normally cool and collected Forbes suddenly starts ranting that with “globalization” and “Wall Street” the President had already betrayed the country long ago. There’s actually an interesting discussion to be had here. However, as that is literally all the exposition he is given, it just comes off as the ranting of a lunatic as opposed to ideological fervor.

    When Kang figures out that Banning is in the White House and killing all his men, he sends Forbes to dispatch him. This should be an easy task, as Banning has no idea that Forbes is a traitor. However, Forbes somehow manages to screw it up by dropping Kang’s name, which he should have no way of knowing. Before being dispatched, a tearful Forbes admits he “lost his way” and repents by telling Kang that Banning is already dead. In this universe, it is literally unthinkable that an American would betray the state for any reason other than a kind of weird insanity.

    As for the other member of the First Family, Connor uses Banning’s teachings to hide in the White House walls. Banning rescues him, and after they impossibly dodge withering automatic weapons fire, Connor is able to escape. Before he gets to safety, Banning gives him his Secret Service badge, telling him he is “one of us now.” Just as Battle: Los Angeles featured Aaron Eckhart’s Marine giving a small boy an honorary membership in the Few and the Proud, so here does the Secret Service make a bid for institutional glory, with the President’s only son dreaming of wearing the sunglasses and earpiece – even after the Secret Service failed to save his mom.

    Of course, in the real world, the Secret Service most recently made the news by frequenting prostitutes in Colombia, and exposing details of the President’s security arrangements to various, uh, “uncleared” personnel. However, in this portrayal of the Secret Service, strong black womyn Angela Bassett leads a veritable army of supremely dedicated professionals ready and even eager to face death in order to save their President.

    As Banning closes in on Kang, we learn Kang’s real agenda is to activate “Cerberus,” a secret program that allows nuclear weapons to self-destruct after being launched in the event of a late abort. Detonating the weapons in their silos won’t just destroy America’s nuclear arsenal, but kill millions around the country. The three codes needed are in the possession of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, the Secretary of Defense, and the President. The first two surrender the codes under torture, but only after being ordered to do so by the President, as he swears “they’ll never get mine.” Kang plans to use Connor to pressure the President into giving up the code – but of course, Connor is quite safe. More importantly, because Banning uses the same video feed to communicate with Kang that Kang used to taunt the American government, President Asher knows his son is safe.

    We’re thus prepared for an epic showdown of will between the terrorist mastermind and the President of the United States. Eckhart will be presumably tortured while screaming heroic defiance, his mangled body and unbreakable spirit interposed between a murderous villain and the lives of the American people. Incredibly, after building up to this critical moment, the film changes tack. We’re just randomly informed that the token female hacker hottie has somehow obtained the code after a few hours work, and the Cerebus countdown begins.

    Kang’s final trick is to disguise his own men and his remaining hostages in all black and take them to the helicopter conveniently provided by the weak Speaker/Acting President. The helicopter explodes in the air, presumably killing President Asher, Kang, and everyone else. However, it’s revealed that Kang sacrificed his own men (and critical hostages like the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs) in order to conceal his own escape with the President.

    Banning foils the plan, and the Cerebus plot hole allows Banning and Kang to have the required bare knuckled showdown with the clock to doomsday ticking away in the background. President Asher is wounded and watches the struggle, cheering “C’mon Banning!” as if he were at a baseball game. Not surprisingly, Banning wins the contest and manages to shut down Cerebus with seconds to spare.

    During a scene that should be fraught with emotional impact, the President and his savior, arms around each other, step into devastation. The bodies of the slain are all around, the center of American power lying in ruins. Incredibly, Banning chooses this moment to make a joke about the house needing to be repaired and they laugh amidst piles of corpses.

    The President issues some banalities at a press conference, the people rise as one, and Banning is returned to his favored position as bodyguard. The decapitation of the South Korean government, the military crisis on the Korean peninsula, and the decimation of the Secret Service and highest levels of the American national security team are all ignored. Instead, we cut to the waving flag as America is restored, and the President says we can eve thank the terrorists for giving us a path to a national rebirth – presumably, only because he is still alive.

    The impulse for personal, even royal leadership is a universal in human history, and so-called republics are not exempt. In the Book of Samuel, the Jews disregard the prophet and God Himself and shout, “Nay; but we will have a king over us.”

    America’s own dynastic [11] tendencies are well established, and even now we debate the various political features of a never ending parade of Bushes, Clintons, and Kennedys. Michelle Obama, who has never held elected office, is spoken of as a future political leader, because being First Lady in the present era serves as a substitute for government experience. In the 19th century, an American genealogist even tried to prove [12] that George Washington was descended from the god Odin [13], the common ancestor of royal lines throughout Europe.

    It is easier to feel loyalty and love towards a person and family than an abstraction. It is no coincidence that countries have been personalized as female deities like Columbia [14], Britannia [15], or Marianne [16] of France. In organic society, there is a link between the royal person, the fertility of the land, and the spirit of the people. The king is the connection [17] between the tribe and their gods, with the royal person functioning, as Poet Laureate Ted Hughes said of Queen Elizabeth II, as the “Leader of the Tribe [18].”

    But what happens when you have no gods? What happens when most people think that the nation is founded on the proposition that there is no nation – just a spot of land where people can come to enjoy “freedom”?

    The answer is the Cult of the Presidency. It is no accident that the Chief Executive, once seen as second in power to Congress, is now the “Most Powerful Man in the World.” The prestige of the office is dependent on America’s military power – one gets the impression that if the President of the United States only became the most second most powerful person in the world, everyone would step caring.

    Furthermore, with the advent of nuclear weapons, the American Head of State can essentially skip the step of serving as a connection to the divine and function as a god himself. After all, with a few simple orders, he reigns death from above with a drone, nukes any foreign adversary with a button, or even destroys all life on earth by unleashing America’s arsenal of missiles and bombs. It’s not an accident that the White House is here referred to as “Olympus,” home of the gods, especially Zeus with his thunderbolts from heaven.

    The result is that American patriotism has increasingly focused on the worship of power for power’s sake. While the British can celebrate a royal wedding or the birth of an heir, the closest thing this country has had to a moment of universal celebration [19] was the killing of Osama Bin Laden [20].

    Presidents serve both as the focal point of the cult and the executors of America’s lethal power. Pictures of the Presidents stare down at Banning as he accomplishes his mission – there’s even an obvious mistake where a portrait of President Barack Obama smirks from the background in a government building. Banning crushes one terrorist to death with a bust of Abraham Lincoln. Like Roman emperors who became gods upon their death, our Presidents are with us still.

    At the height [21]of his popularity [22], George W. Bush able to tap into this yearning for unified leadership. Barack Obama exploited this same desire during his first presidential campaign in order to “unite” the country. Of course, in a modern democracy, the point of government is to divide and eventually dispossess the traditional founding population. In a deeper sense, there’s no “country” to lead, so such moments are always fleeting.

    This leads to the great problem of empires, from Austria-Hungary, to America, and even the fictional Empire of Tamriel in Skyrim [23]. The empire is dependent on a national core that the government relegates to second-class status in order to preserve the whole. In Austria-Hungary it was the Germans and in Skyrim it’s the Nords, but in America, it’s whites, especially whites of Germanic founding stock.

    At one point during the film, the female Secretary of Defense is dragged out, presumably to be killed. In defiance, she screams out the Pledge of Allegiance. Mocking laughter greeted this admittedly corny scene – but it was entirely due to a group of blacks, who were then unable to remain silent for the rest of the film. After the movie ended, a larger number of blacks continued to jeer, and I even caught the occasional obscenity directed at that “flag waving bullshit.” Presumably, President Django will be more to their liking.

    And this is the problem for the United States of America. Olympus Has Fallen actually gives a somewhat favorable portrayal of the Presidency from a Traditionalist perspective. A warrior in chief and a First Servant of the State would be a figure that would deserve homage. America could use a Frederick the Great. However, under our system, as the villain briefly mentioned, we get a frontman for bankers, parasites, and hostile alien elites dedicated to breaking the traditional national population.

    Nonetheless, the white American population, by and large, continues to worship at the national shrines and symbols of the state. They bow before the office of the Presidency, if not the man. However, as America continues to become a Third World colony, the government will increase its program of deliberate dispossession against white Americans.

    Meanwhile, even after the Oval Office has become an affirmative action set aside, nonwhites continue to think of America as somehow foreign to them, with traditional patriotism still identified with America’s unacceptably Aryan past. The result is that American patriotism becomes ever more alienated from both the core white population and the hostile Third World masses.

    What holds it all together is the spectacle of American military and (secondarily) economic power, as expressed through the Presidency. When American power breaks, as it surely must, nonwhites will flee the sinking ship altogether. Whites will find themselves as the priests of a dead god, long since bereft of spiritual substance.

    But that day is far removed, and a powerful empire can stagger on for centuries, no matter how corrupt. While the superpower stands, white Americans continue to make their offerings to the great god of the Red, White, and Blue at the closet thing our civilization has to a temple of sacred myths–the local movie theater.

     

    ...
    (Review Source)
  • The Hollow Empire White House Down
    (”Olympus Has Fallen” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    White_House_Down_27

    [1]3,432 words

    President Django [2]. Now that’s more like it.

    White House Down has essentially the same plot as Olympus Has Fallen [3]the White House has fallen to terrorists, and the President’s life is in danger. Only a frustrated white male, dreaming of joining the Presidential Detail, can save the day with lots of guns, violence, and explosions. Olympus Has Fallen stole a march on White House Down and was surprisingly successful at the box office with its conservative tribute to the military, government institutions, and the benevolent American Imperium. White House Down is like another crappy multicultural remake in the vein of 2011’s Conan the Barbarian [4].

    In this one, all the PC i’s have been dotted and t’s have been crossed. To paraphrase Young Jeezy, my President is black [5], Right wingers want a coup, and I’ll be God-damned if they ain’t white racists too [5]. The message is for the white male to fight against his own kind in order to save his multicultural masters. After all, it’s for his career. If he does a good enough job, he might even get his children back.

    Channing Tatum is John Cale, a Capitol Police officer stuck with the boring job of guarding the lame old white Speaker of the House. The Speaker jokes to Cale that voters want someone who is “cool” and needless to say, he is not cool. Cale gamely tries to tell him he is, to which the Speaker blows his nose. What an old white loser.

    Needless to say, Cale’s wife has already divorced him and dresses like a nineteen-year-old college hippie, the house littered with various trendy Hindu statues. His daughter Emily refers to him as “John.” Her contempt for her father is matched only by her obsession with the President of the United States and the White House. The young Emily somehow has already mastered the bitter, contemptuous attitude of a women’s studies graduate student aiming for a staff job on the Hill. A father can have nothing worse.

    Jamie Foxx is President of these States United with the unintentionally hilarious name of James Sawyer. Foxx consciously channels Barack Obama, even down to his speaking patterns. President Sawyer is what liberals wish President Obama actually was. We first meet him ordering Marine One to “do the thing,” hovering close to the Lincoln Memorial so Sawyer can reverently tell his aides that President Abraham Lincoln wanted to give women the vote when he was in the Illinois Legislature.

    Later, we hear President Sawyer telling a childhood story about a friend planning to commit a robbery because he was poor. He was stopped when Sawyer’s mother took in the friend for a meal and told him he could stay with the Sawyer family. The moral, Sawyer intones, is that the main cause of violence is “poverty.” Thus, President Sawyer has a new plan for Middle East peace, which involves pulling all American forces out of the area. The obstacle to this plan is the military-industrial complex, which is willing to do anything to defend their power and position. President Sawyer says that one of the reasons he wants to do this is because once the troops are out, the President of Iran, whom Sawyer “trusts,” will reveal that American defense contractors have been working with radical regimes to deliberately create war.

    This version of domestic politics is straight out of Oliver Stone’s JFK, but the movie’s premise of “defending the White House” leads to a strange contradiction at the heart of the film. On the one hand, the main villain is the mysterious “military-industrial complex” and various individuals within the national security structure who are not to be trusted, especially white males. On the other hand, in modern America, the heroic President is defined by his position as Commander in Chief of the most powerful military in world history and guardian of America’s nuclear arsenal.

    Marines in full dress, the awed reverence of his aides, the sacred nature of the White House, and President Sawyer’s occasional exercise of naked power are all necessary for us to appreciate the majesty of the President’s person. What is interesting is that while in Olympus Has Fallen the President was the soldierly commander of a larger Imperium, here all of these forces are united in defense of the President himself. After all, the whole point of the movie is that the international deployment of the military is simply a way for evil multinationals to make more money. The film simultaneously insists on the awesome power and importance of the Presidency and the evil of the system that he is a part of.

    Cale, as a lowly peon in the system, has aspirations to reach a higher rung on the ladder by working for the Secret Service. Like most Americans, he has to try to revert to bribes for his daughter’s love by getting her a White House pass while he goes in for his job interview. Unfortunately for him, his interviewer is Carol Finnerty (sad turtle [6] Maggie Gyllenhaal), who knew him when he was younger and remembers his distaste for authority and unimpressive academic credentials.

    Needless to say, Finnerty is also divorced, and her boss Martin Walker encourages her to get out there and build a life away from her job because “it’s not worth it.” To Finnerty of course, her job protecting the head of the state is everything, and she is contemptuous of anyone who cannot live up to her standards. Finnerty’s interview of Cale, who is a combat veteran and a war hero but lacks the credentials that the managerial elite demands, is a ritualistic humiliation.

    After his failure, Cale tries to save face in front of his daughter by lying about his chances. Of course, his emasculation is finalized when President Sawyer pays a surprise visit to the tour and is told by an excited Emily that her father will be on his secret service team. Quickly sensing the lie, the President whispers to Cale to stop lying to children.

    As you may have guessed, terrorists attack the power center of this nation of broken families while Cale and his daughter are still there. The Capitol is destroyed by a bomb while the White House is quickly secured by a team of paramilitaries. The leader is Emil Stenz (Jason Clarke), whom we last saw as the torturer in Zero Dark Thirty [7]. Stenz even makes sure to put a bullet in the head of a picture of George Washington.

    The President himself is captured by Martin Walker (James Woods), the turncoat Head of the Presidential Detail who is actually in league with the terrorists. However, again as you may have guessed, Cale sees an opportunity to save the President and manages to free him, with Sawyer and Cale eventually hiding in an elevator shaft from the bumbling terrorists. The attack itself is rather underwhelming, lacking the epic scale and frankly shocking violence of Olympus Has Fallen. Instead, we’re given an implausible scenario about one small team securing the entire White House, which in turn is all but eliminated by one Capitol Police officer.

    The terrorists are all white and we gradually introduced to their backgrounds because Cale’s plucky daughter manages to upload a video of them to Youtube. One, naturally, “runs a white power blog dedicated to criticizing President Sawyer.” “Lovely,” sneers an official. The main white supremacist is of course an utter cartoon, all swagger, tattoos, and handlebar mustache, whose job is to threaten children and civilian hostages.

    Besides white supremacists, others are ex-military. Stenz is a former Delta Force soldier who undertook missions in Pakistan. President Sawyer, in his justice and wisdom, disavowed the mission, leading to Stenz serving years in a Pakistani prison. As for Walker, his Marine son Kevin was killed in a raid in Iran. However, we learn later that Walker is not motivated by grief – but rage. He thinks that Sawyer’s raid was the best thing he ever did, but he didn’t have the guts to complete the mission and make sure Iran doesn’t get a nuclear weapon.

    Many of the scenes are tedious or just absurd, with former Delta Force soldiers somehow incapable of shooting a single man, even after he is repeatedly taken by surprise. Another scene is an all but exact duplicate of a scene from Olympus Has Fallen, with a helicopter raid foiled by the terrorists’ possession of anti-aircraft missiles, while the protagonist engages in hand to hand combat on the roof. Eventually, we find out the terrorists’ master plan – it’s not money, as originally suggested, but a nuclear attack on the Middle East. Walker believes that the Middle East will be America’s “last war” and he wants to be sure his son is the last one to die for the cause. Sawyer of course is horrified.

    As the film lumbers on, it is eventually revealed that neither Stenz nor Walker is the head of the conspiracy. The real leader was the Speaker of the House. The de rigueur super smart terrorist hacker gets into NORAD and shoots down Air Force One while the Vice President (President while Sawyer is incapacitated and thought dead) is aboard with his staff. The film slowly builds to a climax in the Oval Office. Walker enters the nuclear launch codes that the Speaker provided him to take out Iran. Cale bursts into the Oval Office with a chain gun and rips Walker apart (as well as the picture of George Washington behind him, in an unintentional echo of Stenz’s actions). Meanwhile, with the outside world thinking the President is dead and that hostile forces have control of America’s nuclear arsenal, the Speaker orders an airstrike on the White House to destroy all the evidence. Cale is still fighting with Stenz and President Sawyer is unconscious and everyone is about to die.

    This is stopped by Emily running out onto the White House lawn waving a flag. Not the American flag of course – that is too racist – but the Presidential standard. The jets refuse to deliver their payloads when they see the girl waving the flag, the media hails Emily as a hero, and the Speaker’s treachery is uncovered because he still uses a pager, which allows Cale to lay a trip to reveal the truth. Once again, being uncool is akin to being evil. Cale gets a job on the Secret Service, which means that he wins his daughter’s love and ex-wife’s respect, President Sawyer gets back to taking joy rides on Marine One, and the American people wave as the choppers fly by.

    White House Down is a critically important film because it is an almost perfect encapsulation of the System’s view of us. Looking over the profiles of the terrorists, Finnerty notes that they come from all over the “threat matrix” and were recruited by Walker for that reason. What the film gives us is what the System sees as the real “threat matrix” – white military veterans, white advocates, advocates of military force against the Third World “Others,” and defense contractors associated with conservatives. When the terrorist attack begins, a Fox News-like media outlet reports that the terrorists are most certainly “Muslims or Al-Qaeda” to the knowing laughter of the audience and even the mockery of the terrorists.

    A Rush Limbaugh like figure who was in the press gallery is hailed as the “only one who tells the truth” by the cartoonish white supremacist. Of course, he is fat, weak, and blubbering. He redeems himself by putting his body in between Emily a terrorist’s gun, but even this is played for laughs, as he is shot after Stenz says, “Seriously?” A white tour guide whose entire identity is tied up in his job is another figure of fun, cocking a shotgun dramatically (and unnecessarily [8]) when he leads tourists to safety. The “uncool” Speaker is, of course, revealed to be the ultimate villain. Whites are either grim terrorist murders who threaten children, or are weak, effeminate, corrupt, and stupid.

    Cale is the obvious exception, but he is a kind of honorary Negro, adopting ghetto slang in the midst of combat. When Cale is first confronted by an enemy, he begins crying and pretends to be simply a tourist. When the terrorist lowers his weapon, Cale shoots him, and then taunts the corpse in the manner straight out of World Star Hip Hop – “You think you’re tough, bitch?” Of course, it was the terrorist’s relative magnanimity that cost him his life. This isn’t the only time Cale deploys “bitch” after a deadly fight. After all, he wins back his family (sort of) and some kind of status by accepting his role as protector to his daughter’s black “hero.”

    Cale and Sawyer run around the White House in various tedious situations, dispatching henchmen, with the President occasionally joining in the fun. In White House Down, our action hero President is a “white” acting black man who rediscovers his “real” blackness. The Boondocks satirized [9] (and criticized) this as a “nigga moment [10].” Here, the transition from “nerd” to “thug” even in the President of the United States is celebrated. After all, whites are being killed, and that’s awesome!

    No longer needing to conceal their intentions, the System’s media complex openly encourages violence against whites – either in the streets or as a matter of policy. As Bill Maher put it when he encouraged Barack Obama to use [11] state power against whites, “I want a real black president!” before fantasizing about the President revealing a gun in his pants. Well, White House Down gives us that.

    Sawyer slowly transforms from President of the United States into Head Nigga in Charge, gradually adopting more ghetto slang and jokes. He even puts on a pair of Air Jordans at one point, and kicks at a terrorist’s head with the words, “Get yo’ hands off my Jordans!” (Of course Air Jordans have been the cause of more black deaths in this country [12] than any “white supremacists.”) Later, the President tells Walker in a pronouncement that comes with “the full weight and authority of my office – fuck you.” Thus, we get Barack Obama making a slow transition into a denizen of BET when the chips are down. (This transmutation isn’t unusual [13].)

    There is a powerful subliminal message in the film with the destruction of Congress and the salvation of the White House. Congress is, after all, the home of the movie’s main villain, and housing other Congressmen who (it is suggested) are unconscionably opposing President Sawyer. In Olympus Has Fallen, the President is a centurion, first officer of a militaristic empire and another in a long line of the soldier-statesmen of the American Imperium. Here the President is our protector from White Americans, including the military, defense contractors, Right-wing radio hosts, and the more reactionary elements of Congress. Only the enlightened black President can defend the United States from its worst elements – namely those whites who are not interested in being part of the system.

    But what of these villains? Their motivations are mixed, and there is a great deal of conflict among the different individuals over the course of the movie. The white power terrorists are of course just portrayed as stupid. Walker and Stein are given slightly more dignity. When one of the terrorists protests that Walker’s nuclear attack on Muslims isn’t “part of the plan” and he’s just here for the money, Walker cries out in outrage, “You think I would put my country through this for money?”

    One of the movie’s best moments is when Walker’s wife is brought in to the Pentagon to try to dissuade her husband from carrying out his plan. We’re expecting the usual whines for “non-violence” and “just stopping this” and “can’t we all just get along?” Mrs. Walker does start her plea that way. However, once Walker says he is doing this for her son, Mrs. Walker’s features change. She tells her husband, “Then do it.” An almost hysterical Finnerty tells Walker that she’ll be put in custody forever. The scene gives Walker and his wife more soldierly dignity and stoicism than all the bumbling generals running around the Pentagon put together.

    Of course, this is somewhat undone by the revelation that the Speaker is the main villain after all. The true patriots who want to actually win the war against the Muslim enemy are just puppets for the defense contractors. Needless to say, this plan doesn’t make much sense. If “radical regimes” are in league with defense contractors, why is the plan to nuke those radical regimes? Why would defense contractors actually favor a decisive victory in the “War Against Terrorism” by essentially exterminating the Muslim World with nuclear missiles, instead of long drawn out pointless wars that consume weapons and material [14]?

    But of course, it doesn’t need to make sense. Whites are privileged, effete, and fat and at the same time, dangerous, poor, and violent. They are both bourgeois conservative scum and dangerous white trash radicals. What matters is that the only good white is a subordinate white, a white who dedicates his existence to the principle of equality and benefiting nonwhites. After all, in the end, Sawyer is struggling to align with the President of Iran against his own country. It should also be noted that in this film, Israel is one of the countries that swiftly aligns with Sawyer’s peace plan to withdraw all American forces. Needless to say, the Jewish role in America’s interventionist foreign policy is ignored, and the Jewish State is also on the side of the angels.

    The better comparison for this film may not be to Olympus Has Fallen but Air Force One. In that film, the President of the United States (Harrison Ford) is a former Medal of Honor winner and Vietnam vet who takes back the Presidential plane single-handed. The villain (Gary Oldman, in one of his best [15] roles), is a Russian nationalist who lectures the President on how he has handed over his homeland to “gangsters and prostitutes,” which is essentially what actually happened [16]. When the evil “General Radek” is released, his followers incongruously sing “the Internationale [17],” as Communism and Fascism have been fused [18] into a demonic anti-liberalism in the minds of most Americans [19].

    Nonetheless, the President, as an old-fashioned action hero [20] and traditional military man, restores “democracy” through superior firepower and old-fashioned American grit. American dominance over the world is reaffirmed. In White House Down, the President doesn’t fight to end terrorism, but to excuse it. The enemy is not foreign nationalists, but American nationalists. And the President achieves victory over his own government and military, rather than being saved by them.

    Interestingly, White House Down has bombed [21] despite being more in tune with the Zeitgeist than the more reactionary Olympus Has Fallen. Its failure is so complete that Sony Entertainment may be spun off [22]from the rest of the company. While Olympus Has Fallen consciously cultivated the military and older veterans, White House Down relied on marketing to the more “vibrant,” younger consumers of Generation Obama.

    The problem is that even though American culture and government may have been remade into a monstrous conglomeration of Obama, Martin Luther King, and Jay Z, younger Americans (especially non-whites) don’t see it that way. They don’t want to see Jamie Foxx as President of the United States – they want to see him slaughtering conservative whites himself. They don’t want to see a white hero saving the White House – they want to see nonwhite heroes gunning down white boys, like in Django Unchained and Machete. They don’t want to see a younger version of a disingenuous white liberal saving the day – they want to see whitey getting what’s coming to him.

    Thus, White House Down isn’t just boring – it’s confused. America simultaneously wants to call upon its past but also condemn it as racist and unequal. It wants to tell us we are all in this together, but condemn the core population as inherently privileged and evil. It wants to be the military superpower but exterminate the Traditionalist reserves of culture, race, and identity that nations can call upon in crisis and war. Both the hero and the villain put a bullet in the head of the Father of Our Country.

    The film’s political and racial messages are so contradictory that there’s no constituency left to go see the movie. Of course, that’s also what’s happening to the country. When the nation is actually in trouble, there might not be any real Americans left to defend it.

     

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Plugged In1
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Olympus Has Fallen
    DramaAction/AdventureWar We hope this review was both interesting and useful. Please share it with family and friends who would benefit from it as well.Movie ReviewThe White House has been called the "most protected building on earth." But even the most secure bastion can theoretically be compromised, if not by brute force, then perhaps by wily subterfuge. Just ask the populace of Troy about a certain infamous horse. Or, for that matter, the devilishly deceptive North Korean terrorists whom the President of the United States unwittingly invites right into his most secure stronghold in Olympus Has Fallen. Once that happens, all the king's horses and all the king's men—not to mention all his helicopters, jets and four-star generals—are powerless to help him put "Olympus" back together again. The only man with even a slim chance to save the president and stave off nuclear holocaust is a disgraced former Secret Service agent. It's July 5. A day that begins like any other for Mike Banning, who, for the last year and a half, has been shuffling off to his soul-sapping desk job at the U.S. Treasury Department. The job's a punishment more than a career. He's been doing it ever since failing to pull the first lady from an SUV slipping over an icy precipice. The former Special Forces veteran longs to erase his shame and return to his real passion: protecting President Benjamin Asher and the first son, Connor. But for now, it's an unmet longing … one that leaves Banning restless and irritable while it erodes his marriage to Leah, an ER nurse. But July 5, it turns out, will not be a day that ends like any other. The president is set to receive a South Korean delegation, including the country's prime minister, to talk about North Korea's increasingly threatening political posture. No sooner has that discussion begun, however, than a heavily armed military transport plane slips through the nation's security net and bears down on the White House—a threat prompting the Secret Service to usher the president into his über-secure command bunker. The president insists upon taking the South Koreans with him. It seems the attack is contained when the rogue aircraft is downed on the National Mall. But that's just the cue for more terrorists—including the supposed South Korean security team surrounding the prime minister—to hit the White House itself in a second wave from the outside … and from inside the president's hermetically sealed sanctum. North Korean terrorist Kang soon begins issuing demands. First, that the Americans remove their forces from the Demilitarized Zone between North and South Korea. Second, that they move the 7th Fleet out of the area. Third, that they surrender three codes to the Cerberus system, a fail-safe program designed to disable the country's nuclear arsenal in the event of an accidental launch. Kang and Co. clearly have plans for those codes—and for America. The acting president, Speaker of the House Allan Trumbull, is pondering his options and on the verge of acceding to Kang's terms when he learns that hope is not yet lost. The shocking message that Olympus has fallen is accompanied by news that Mike Banning has managed to infiltrate the smoking war zone the White House has become. His first job: rescuing young Connor. His second job: rescuing the chap's dad, the POTUS. His third job: rescuing America before Kang can push the country's self-destruct button.Positive ElementsOlympus Has Fallen majors in heroism and courage. Exhibiting ample amounts of both in his pursuit of Kang is Banning, who refuses to give up until he's accomplished all three of his life-and-death objectives. Also especially courageous is Secretary of Defense Ruth McMillan. Despite being tied up, punched, kicked and beaten by Kang, she remains defiantly unwilling to submit to his brutal intimidation. Kang's trying to get her Cerberus code, along with the one assigned to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Both officials are willing to resist to the death. The film shows how grief and shame debilitate Banning and the president after Banning fails to save the first lady. Banning is depressed and despondent, longing for a shot at redemption. The president and his tween son are still grieving too. We see Asher trying to set aside his presidential mantle so he can just be the dad Conner needs. Likewise, Banning has a special bond with the boy, and seeks to find and rescue him with the same fierce determination a father might exhibit. Spiritual ContentKang gloats, "I read your Bible, Mr. President. It says, 'The wages of sin is death.'" The president asks an American traitor who's helped the North Koreans, "What's the going rate for souls these days?" In an address to the America people, President Asher says, "May God bless you, and may God bless the United States of America." He also mentions praying for those who've been lost. Trumbull says of Kang at one point, "He's just opened the gates of hell." The code name for the White House is Olympus, a reference to the abode of the Greek gods.Sexual ContentThe president and his wife kiss. She wears a cleavage-baring dress. While being dragged by terrorists, Secretary McMillan's blouse is inadvertently torn off, and we see her in a camisole.Recommended ResourceA Chicken's Guide to Talking Turkey With Your Kids About SexKevin LemanEven the bravest parents feel timid about discussing sex with their 8- to 14-year-olds! This resource offers reassuring, humorous, real-life anecdotes along with reliable information to help you with this challenging task.Buy NowViolent ContentOnce the North Korean assault begins, it's pretty much nonstop carnage. A transport plane unleashes its wrath first on two jet fighters, then (via massive machine guns) on the inhabitants of D.C. The plane eventually collides with the Washington Monument, and falling bricks bury fleeing tourists. Six Black Hawk helicopters are destroyed as casualties mount. One copter crashes into the White House explosively and nearly kills Banning. At the White House, North Koreans unleash a massive assault on the presidential residence. Machine guns, rocket-propelled grenades, hand grenades and tear gas overwhelm the security team. Banning (with help from a few others) eventually kills all comers (more than 50) using guns, knives and fists. Thus, we see many, many people getting gruesomely shot, with blood spray and gore frequently accompanying their deaths. Twice Banning kills people in cold blood after interrogating them (both times with knives to the head). Throats are slit. Necks broken. By film's end, the few people who've survived must pick their way through the litter of bodies. Below ground, in the president's bunker, one woman is brutally executed with a gunshot to the head. Another is beaten, kicked and essentially tortured in an attempt to get information. A South Korean official is similarly executed. The film opens with the horrifying accident that leaves the president and his wife's vehicle dangling over the edge of a bridge on a snowy winter night. Her head is bloody and she's unconscious as Banning tries to extricate her before the car flips onto the ice below and slips beneath the water.Crude or Profane LanguageBanning sarcastically dubs North Korea "The United People's Front of I Don't Give a F‑‑‑." Beyond that, there are about 35 more f-words and a dozen or so s-words. We hear "h‑‑‑," "a‑‑," a‑‑hole," "b‑‑ch" and "d‑‑n." Also, eight or 10 misuses of God's name (including three paired with "d‑‑n"), and six or eight abuses of Jesus' name.Drug and Alcohol ContentSomebody smokes cigarettes.Other Negative ElementsConclusionMost Americans don't tremble with fear at the thought of a modern North Korean assault in the way we once feared the Soviet Union during the Cold War. But that hasn't stopped a new generation of moviemakers from casting the shadowy North Korean regime in Russia's old role.  Red Dawn remake, anyone? Olympus Has Fallen feels marginally more believable than the 2012 incarnation of Red Dawn. It's easier to conceive of a deceptive scheme like the one Kang unleashes than it is to suspend disbelief when it comes to the full-on military assault Red Dawn depicts. That said, there's a more obvious comparison Olympus Has Fallen evokes: Die Hard. Just as Bruce Willis' John McClane deals out deadly underdog retribution in each of those franchise films, so Gerard Butler does here. As cool as Olympus Has Fallen is as a title, it more easily could have been called Die Hard 6: White House Wasteland. And there's a lot of waste here, and even more hard dying, to be sure. We see innocent civilians getting mowed down in the streets and bricks falling on them from the toppling Washington Monument. We see a bloody boy in the ER. We see one woman repeatedly beaten to a bloody pulp, and another led screaming and terrified to her death as Kang coldly puts a gun to her head and pulls the trigger … on camera as a shocked national security team watches in real time at the Pentagon. We see knives to throats, knives to heads. We know where it's all going, of course. Where it has to go. Kang getting what's coming to him. Violently. And his bloody end gets paired, almost simultaneously, with a reaffirmation of the American way of life, one that embraces "dignity," "integrity" and "honor," President Asher tells the country in a speech after Kang is dispatched. At its best, our country is absolutely about those virtues. They're absolutely worth fighting for. And dying for, if need be. Still, I couldn't help but wonder as I listened to the theater audience hoot, clap and cheer when Banning stuck a knife in Kang's head whether or not brutal, hyperviolent entertainment such as this is really the best way to reinforce those cherished values.Pro-social ContentObjectionable ContentSummary AdvisoryPlot SummaryChristian BeliefsOther Belief SystemsAuthority RolesProfanity/ViolenceKissing/Sex/HomosexualityDiscussion TopicsAdditional Comments/NotesEpisode Reviews]]>
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PJ Media Staff3
PJ Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • CPAC Movie Review: Olympus Has Fallen
    PJ Media The White House (codename: Olympus) has fallen into the hands of North Korean terrorists.  They've neutralized the presidential security detail; captured the president, the vice president, the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the secretary of Defense; and are held up in the Presidential Emergency Operations Center (PEOC).  Only disgraced Secret Service agent Mike Banning, played by Gerard Butler, can save the president.  In all, it's Die Hard in the White House, and it's awesome.After being unable to save the president's wife after an accident, Banning is taken off his security detail.  He is then relegated to a soporific desk job.  As tensions along the 38th parallel intensify, which mirrors our current situation, a few North Koreans decided it's time to bring their misery to American shores.  So, they use a C-130 gunship to shoot up Washington, D.C., while using a crack commando team to storm the walls of the White House under the cover of dump trucks retrofitted with heavy machine guns to provide cover.  They wipe out the entire Secret Service contingent assigned to the White House.With the president and vice president in enemy hands, it's up to the speaker of the House, played by Morgan Freeman, to navigate through this unprecedented situation.  In the meantime, Agent Banning shoots, stabs, and chokes his way towards PEOC – and the president.  However, he has very little time, as the North Koreans are working on accessing America's nuclear arsenal.The film is fun, action-packed, and filled with good one-liners.  Concerning authenticity, Ricky James, a security advisor and counter-terrorism expert, said it's possible to launch an attack on the White House.  He said:We’ve cut the defense budget. We’ve cut the intelligence budget.  We’ve cut the intelligence staff…we have foreign and American domestic terrorists on our soil.  And if you put all that in a melting pot, I’m not saying they’ll be successful in taking the White House, but an attack could take place.James is also a veteran of presidential details for President George H. W. Bush, and served as an advisor on the film.  Additionally, he hopes that Americans leave with a feeling of pride and admiration for members of the U.S. Secret Service for all that they do protecting the president and serving their country. Nevertheless, he didn't look like he would be missing the grueling twenty-hour work days during production.It's an exciting film, and definitely worth the price of admission. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/blog/cpac-movie-review-olympus-has-fallen/ ]]>
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  • The Film Remains the Same
    (”Olympus Has Fallen” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Ed Driscoll var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Monty Python- Du00E9ju00E0 Vu', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); It's not just that 200-million dollar Hollywood blockbusters these days are limited to franchises such as superhero movies, James Bond and other action flicks, and sci-fi such as Star Trek, and when Disney starts cranking out the next round of sequels, Star Wars. But as Peter Suderman notes at Slate, within those already limited genres, their plotting is even more limited:If you’ve gone to the movies recently, you may have felt a strangely familiar feeling: You’ve seen this movie before. Not this exact movie, but some of these exact story beats: the hero dressed down by his mentor in the first 15 minutes (Star Trek Into Darkness, Battleship); the villain who gets caught on purpose (The Dark Knight, The Avengers, Skyfall, Star Trek Into Darkness); the moment of hopelessness and disarray a half-hour before the movie ends (Olympus Has Fallen, Oblivion, 21 Jump Street, Fast & Furious 6).It’s not déjà vu. Summer movies are often described as formulaic. But what few people know is that there is actually a formula—one that lays out, on a page-by-page basis, exactly what should happen when in a screenplay. It’s as if a mad scientist has discovered a secret process for making a perfect, or at least perfectly conventional, summer blockbuster.The formula didn’t come from a mad scientist. Instead it came from a screenplay guidebook, Save the Cat! The Last Book on Screenwriting You’ll Ever Need. In the book, author Blake Snyder, a successful spec screenwriter who became an influential screenplay guru, preaches a variant on the basic three-act structure that has dominated blockbuster filmmaking since the late 1970s.Read the whole thing. As far back as 44 years ago, Stanley Kubrick told an interviewer that "The problem with movies is that since the talkies, the film industry has historically been conservative and word-oriented. The three-act play has been the model. It's time to abandon the conventional view of the movie as an extension of the three-act play." I wonder what he would think of how rigid and sclerotic Hollywood structuring has become; check out the page that Suderman wrote to accompany his Slate article, laying out the formula in step-by-step fashion.Occasionally a film deviates from that structure, such as most of Kubrick's post-Strangelove efforts, and Tarantino's Reservoir Dogs and Pulp Fiction, with their circular plotting.  But as Suderman notes, when there's $200 mil or more on the line, Hollywood has a formula, and it's going to run it into the ground -- and it essentially has.Meanwhile, a very different director bemoans another Hollywood formula:"I hate 3-D," moaned Alfonso Cuarón yesterday at Comic-Con. "The black and whites, they suck. It takes away the color, and it takes away the resolution." So why did Cuarón shoot his next movie, the Sandra Bullock–starring space epic Gravity, in 3-D?Oooh, I know! I know! And so does Hollywood producer Lynda Obst, who touches upon 3D in her new book, Sleepless in Hollywood:At first 3D was thought to be the savior of the business, the technological breakthrough that would compensate for the DVD disaster. But it was overused, slapped on pictures that weren’t shot in 3D. Some insiders were investors, which complicated matters so much that at one point a famous mogul-investor suggested to Paramount and Scorsese that they release The Departed in 3D.It was such the rage that every movie that was being made in the wake of Avatar and Alice in Wonderland, the medium’s first two blockbusters, was going to be in 3D. But the onslaught of lousy conversions gave the process a black eye and exhausted the sophisticated young audience in the United States, and many very young kids in the domestic family audience rejected it as well.But in emerging markets, 3D is another story. In China and Russia, they Just Can’t Get Enough. The studios soon faced a puzzle in the wildly divergent appetites for 3D domestically and internationally. In the United States the appetite is diminishing from over-saturation; in the critical international audience, it is crack. Now it is necessary to make two versions of films, both 3D and 2D, so the 3D doesn’t keep the U.S. audience away.Perhaps because I hate putting cardboard glasses on top of my real glasses, personally, I truly loathe 3D, and always try to avoid it at the movies if at all possible. But then, I've tried to avoid a lot of Hollywood's current product, particularly since I've seen it all before: class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/eddriscoll/2013/7/19/the-film-remains-the-same/ ]]>
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  • 'If You Want To Send A Message, Use Western Union'
    (”Olympus Has Fallen” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Ed Driscoll "Hollywood’s summer is more than halfway over, and the box-office report is telling," Kyle Smith writes at the New York Post. "If you want to have a hit, don’t lard your film with tendentious, off-putting, off-topic political messages:"In “White House Down,” a Tea Party-like cabal goes so far as to attack the White House and force a president (Jamie Foxx) obviously modeled on Barack Obama into fighting for his life (right at the moment when he was going to sign a major peace deal and also eliminate poverty). The film is so overtly (and, given that its director is Roland Emmerich, comically) political that audiences couldn’t even take it as seriously as the generic “Die Hard” rip-off “Olympus Has Fallen.”Said Isaac Chotiner of The New Republic, the film “resembles a season of ‘24’ as re-written by Noam Chomsky.” Hey, nothing says blockbuster like Noam Chomsky. “White House Down” is one of the year’s biggest flops.Disney’s “The Lone Ranger” is meant to continue in the 50-year-history of “revisionist Westerns,” meaning “this time white dudes are the villains.” The title character is played as an oafish sidekick by the bland actor Armie Hammer, while the actual star is Johnny Depp as Tonto. Tonto informs us solemnly, “Indians are like coyotes. They kill and leave nothing to waste. What does the white man kill for?”Simple. As Woody Allen once said, we kill for food. And not only that, frequently there must be a beverage.But the tired idea that Indians were ecologists, right down to their allegedly noble killing habits, is itself an early-’70s myth that doesn’t stand up to historical scrutiny, so this would-be daring film gets stuck in PC quicksand.In fact, the Indians used any wasteful methods they could to kill buffalo (including driving them off cliffs or setting fire to the land on all four sides), then left most of the meat to rot in the sun.The villains of “The Lone Ranger”? Greedy capitalists. Like the ones at Disney who charge 3-year-olds $89 for a day’s admission to the Magic Kingdom.After watching The Lone Ranger, Blogger/talk radio host J.P. Travis asks, "When did white men become second class citizens?"I'm hard to insult. Maybe it's my thick skin, maybe it's my thick head. But racist insults directed at white men in this movie—mostly from Tonto—were so rampant and so contrived I was noticeably subdued when it was over. I felt like a Gitmo detainee forced to watch a video of his own water boarding.If it was just once that Tonto called the Lone Ranger a "stupid white man" that wouldn't be so bad, but the racism was constant and left me wondering why our culture considers this okay. Obviously, if Hollywood made a movie that spent $259 million and 149 minutes insulting some other race, the crap would be in the fan. At the denouement of the movie, when Tonto is summing up the lessons learned from his epic battle with his lifelong enemy (by the way, why wasn't the movie titled Tonto instead of The Lone Ranger since it was basically all about Tonto and the Lone Ranger was an idiot?)... where was I? Oh yeah, Tonto says to the bad guy: "All these years I think you are wendigo [a Native American demon]. Now I see that you’re just another white man." In other words, in case that was too subtle, "white man" is synonymous with "demon." He has another little speech later where he tells some Chinese railroad workers how bad white men are, whereupon all the Chinese guys nod their heads in agreement—"Very funny!" as TBS would say—but I forget what he said that time. I was thinking about other stuff by that point. Like how to get my money back for the ticket.As Kyle Smith writes, politicized films can sometimes have an effective opening weekend (although that wasn't the case with the Lone Ranger). However, word of mouth that a film is a giant leftwing sucker punch spreads fast -- these days, faster than ever. At the end of his article, Smith notes:Every summer the Brad Pitts of the world have to relearn the wisdom of MGM mogul Sam Goldwyn (though the line attributed to him actually came from playwright Moss Hart): If you want to send a message, use Western Union.But for the past decade, the audience -- an Army of Eberts! -- can send themselves messages as well -- which have been known to quickly sink a film if it's bad enough. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/eddriscoll/2013/7/15/use-western-union/ ]]>
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Crosswalk1
Cross Walk



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Brutal Olympus Has Fallen Insults Our Intelligence
    Movies DVD Release Date: August 13, 2013Theatrical Release Date: March 22, 2013Rating: R (for strong violence and strong language throughout)Genre: Action DramaRun Time: 120 minDirector: Antoine FuquaCast: Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart, Morgan Freeman, Angela Bassett, Dylan McDermott, Rick Yune, Melissa Leo, Ashley Judd As culture and media steadily coarsen, the ante continues to be raised on what level of content is deemed permissible in mainstream entertainment. The surest way to provoke a reaction is to be more graphic than what’s come before. Regarding violence, Olympus Has Fallen takes that next step for base Hollywood action movies – and does so in two ways.  One, pure volume. We’ve seen bloody killings before, no doubt, but once the carnage starts here it rarely lets up.  What used to pass for graphic money shots are now standard throughout, with so many staged for the clear intent of basking in the brutality. Two, the context.  It’s one thing when sicko villains perpetrate violence to elicit an audience’s repulsion. It’s another when the hero does just as much in order to get the crowd cheering, and even evoke a perverse jingoism.  In short, Olympus Has Fallen isn’t the mindless action fun you may have been hoping for. Sure, it’s stupid (and more on that shortly), but what makes this truly vile is the level of blood lust that fuels the good guy. For example, he both promises and delivers on the threat to stab a terrorist in the head until he’s dead (not to mention the countless gun-to-head point blank killings, fully visualized). And then the movie has the audacity to wrap all that brutality up in the American flag. This is video game violence porn cloaked in cornball patriotism – and you’re expected to applaud it. The premise is simple: Die Hard in the White House. Apparently, though, that’s easier conceived than done. In a post-9/11 world – one in which an elderly person can be accosted for just trying to get through airport security – it would take a lot of intelligence, skill, and resources to make a siege of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue credible.  googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-1'); }); Suffice it to say, Olympus Has Fallen (the code phrase for capture and control of the White House) doesn’t even make a cursory effort at plausibility. In fact, the ease with which a group of North Korean terrorists take the premises and hold President Asher (Aaron Eckhart, Battle Los Angeles) and his Cabinet members hostage defies all logic.  It’s predicated on nothing short of the worst breach of security, intelligence, and armed forces protocol one could possibly imagine. Maybe this shouldn’t come as a surprise; even the film’s prologue depicts another completely avoidable tragedy as the result of bizarre Secret Service decision making (note to agents: don’t ever take a Presidential motorcade through a blizzard). One could say that at least the movie follows its own internal illogic, but that would only emphasize its problems rather than excuse them. The primary reason for this lethally botched opener, of course, is to set the stage for Agent Mike Banning’s redemption. Fired from the Presidential detail after that ill-fated winter disaster, Banning (Gerard Butler, Playing For Keeps) ends up being the only skilled man on the outside who can infiltrate the White House grounds and save the day. Pretty standard fare, as formula plots go, even though it requires yet another sinkhole of logic as to why there is literally no other option than That Guy (who, incidentally, must first save the President’s son because the kid didn’t have any agents protecting him). The raid itself boggles the mind. Seeing a North Korean terrorist militia, armed to the teeth, descend on Washington D.C. – through both land and air – and be able to do so completely undetected is implausible enough. Then to see them raid and capture the Presidential mansion unabated by any form of response from U.S. forces or security is completely and utterly ridiculous. It’s as if they were invading my house, not the White House. Setting aside the film’s confounding premise, the remaining plot machine that unfolds is boilerplate in both action and dialogue – albeit with excessive violence. North Korean terrorists want to restart the Korean War, apparently, so they hold hostage, threaten, torture, and sadistically kill members of the President’s staff. As these rebels make demands so impossible that they defy time, space, and matter, Banning sneaks through the White House corridors John McClane style… minus the style. Unless, of course, you call gory methodical killings punctuated by cheesy one-liners style.  The film’s lazy excuse for a “response” team is having the Speaker of the House (Morgan Freeman, The Dark Knight Rises), the Secret Service Agency Director (Angela Bassett, This Means War), a General and an aide (whose sole purpose is to spout unrelenting exposition with a panic-stricken look on his face), essentially do nothing but watch and spout dramatics from a control room. That and Banning’s worried wife/Super Nurse serve as the perfunctory cutaway b-plots. Even with all of the excesses considered, what ultimately makes Olympus Has Fallen unbearable is its own self-import. Director Antoine Fuqua (Shooter) seems to believe he’s paying tribute to the brave agents of our Secret Service, and even inspiring us to honor them. The problem is he attempts this with a premise that requires our agents to be the stupidest, laziest, weakest, and completely unprepared group of intelligence officers the world has ever seen. The only way this movie happens is if the entire Secret Service and Intelligence community fail – multiple times, at historic proportions. This isn’t a tribute; it’s an insult. CAUTIONS: googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-2'); }); if (gptClientWidth >= 992 && gptClientWidth <= 1000000) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-3'); }); Drugs/Alcohol Content: Casual alcohol consumption; no drunkenness. Language/Profanity: Strong language throughout.  The F-word is commonly used, as are most others – include a few instances of the Lord’s name taken in vain, along with a couple of crude/vulgar terms. Sexual Content/Nudity: A few instances of married couples kissing.  Violence/Other: Excessively violent, visualizing gory killings throughout.  Victims of a car crash, bloody slashed heads.  Multiple point-blank to the head killings, graphically shown.  Aftermath of a suicide bomber explosion.  Innocent civilians mowed down and slaughtered by terrorist gunfire.  Two different people stabbed in the head, another stabbed in the neck.  Bloody bullet-hole wounds shown.  Lots of bloody killings in general, many indiscriminate and graphic.  Severed limbs, cracked bones, assassinations of officials.  Captives held hostage, with vile and lethal threats made toward them.  A woman is beaten and dragged around by the hair.  Other people beaten/tortured as well.  Hand-to-hand violence and brutality. Publication date: March 22, 2013 ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Kyle Smith1
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Review: "Olympus Has Fallen"
    It’s better than the latest “Die Hard,” but that doesn’t make “Olympus Has Fallen” a good movie. My review is up.]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Michael Medved1



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Olympus Has Fallen
    ...
    (Review Source)

Debbie Schlussel1
The New York Post



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Wknd Box Office: Olympus Has Fallen, Spring Breakers, Admission
    Blog Posts Movie Reviews Admission“: I found this mawkish, lefty-grungy-feely movie incredibly annoying, pretentious, and irritating. It was also supposed to be a comedy, but it just wasn’t funny. It was long, slow, and boring. A rich, liberal White guy (Paul Rudd) adopting a Black kid from Africa . . . yawn. Madonna, Charlize Theron, Palestina Jolie, and Sandra Bullock already own this fashion accessory. A bunch of liberal Princeton college admissions officers who put liberal activities and behavior as well as race and ethnicity ahead of actual academic achievement in choosing whom to admit to the Ivy Leagues . . . also not news. A liberal school for high school and middle school students where nothing much is taught other than how to build alternative irrigation in Africa and how to be “better citizens of the world” by helping a cow give birth? Well, that is just beyond annoying. And did I mention that the guy who adopted the Black kid is the one running this crazy, silly, BS school? If none of this sounds irritating enough to watch on-screen, add in lesbian Lily Tomlin as a crazy, ugly feminist (yup, she’s playin’ herself) with a Betty Friedan tattoo and a poster of a fish on a bicycle, an homage to Gloria Steinem’s rejection of men (she famously said women need men as much as a fish needs a bicycle). Tomlin is the single mother of the vastly over-rated Tina Fey, who is an admissions officer at Princeton, eager to get a promotion to Dean of Admissions. She is also recently dumped by her boyfriend and is told that a kid at a liberal, unstructured “developmental” school called “Quest” (see above description) is the son she gave birth to in college and gave up for adoption. The facts seem to match up and jibe with the likelihood that he is her son. The kid has atrocious grades, but we’re told he is an “auto-didact” who teaches himself to learn. (I don’t need to be auto-irritated. I sat through this movie, which performed that task quite well.) Fey goes out on a limb to get the kid admitted into Princeton and predictably develops a relationship with the man who heads the school (Rudd). The movie also co-stars the loathsome Wallace Shawn, a self-hating, anti-Semitic, anti-Israel “Jew” In Name Only. No thanks. But even without him, I could not stand this movie. The kids in it were pretentiously and obnoxiously to the far-left. But it didn’t appear that the movie was mocking them. Rather, it was lauding these future Hillary Clinton voters who rail against corporate America and other stale, old, refried crap of the left. Ick. I couldn’t tell, either if the movie was mocking feminism, or again, trying to endear us to this baloney. Doesn’t matter. Either way, don’t waste your time or money on this insipid gruel. An absolute waste of time. “Admission” literally isn’t worth the price of admission. They should be paying you to sit through this. THREE MARXES ]]>
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    (Review Source)

The Federalist Staff1
The Federalist



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Hate 'London Has Fallen' For Its Camp, Not 'Islamophobia'
    (”Olympus Has Fallen” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Critics cannot abide “London Has Fallen,” the terrorist-foiling actioneer starring Gerald Butler as Mike Banner, once again fighting to keep his boss, President Mike Asher (Aaron Eckhart), out of the clutches of terrorists. Is it because of the muddy, confusing cinematography, the ridiculous storyline, the ludicrously durable hero fighting off hundreds of poorly aiming terrorists with a medium-sized knife? Yes, but mostly because in a day and age of terrorist attacks in European cities by Middle Easterners, it’s apparently offensive and racist to make an action movie about Middle Eastern terrorists attacking European cities. “London Has Fallen” is a sequel to 2013’s “Olympus Has Fallen,” which didn’t win many awards but benefited from an enclosed “‘Die Hard’ in the White House” setup. Its lukewarm reception was positively rapturous compared to the moralistically scathing notices that have trailed “London,” perhaps because North Koreans are somehow more acceptable villains than Arabs. The story, more or less: Two years after a drone strike aimed at a terrorist blows up a Pakistani family at a wedding, an incredibly thorough revenge plot comes to fruition as world leaders gather in London for the funeral of the British Prime Minister. From there, a motley collection of terrorists (including a Beefeater) start picking off Europe’s finest, bombing Parliament, and blowing up boats on the Thames. President Asher, who really only wanted to send flowers, must once again be saved by his loyal Secret Service agent, played by Scottish action star Butler, from a fate worse than death: death on YouTube. Cue the Social Justice Whining Film critics, taking cues from the new crop of social justice binge-watchers who consider every new show episode a potential problem, are desperately unhappy about the terrorists’ Arabic mien. (Apparently they’re supposed to be British, like they are in every other action movie.) The new crop of social justice binge-watchers consider every new show episode a potential problem. Problematic? Oh, “London” goes way beyond “problematic.” It’s “freely offensive,” racist, and Islamophobic to boot. Even the massacres in Paris by radical Islamists last November are seen not as a post-justification for the movie’s plot, but somehow make it even more offensive. Christian Holub of Entertainment Weekly, a formerly entertaining read now in a sharp decline into PC activism, found using an ISIS-like villain morally dubious: “By casting its villain as a suspiciously ISIS-like Middle Eastern terrorist network, London Has Fallen makes itself into a political movie – but its politics are heinous…. At one point, Banning even tells one of the terrorists to ‘head back to F–headistan or wherever you’re from.’ (Incidentally, this racism extends to the terrorists speaking accented English the whole movie, where the European leaders are given the luxury of subtitles).” As if having the terrorists speaking in Arabic would make him feel any better. We’ll Virtue Signal Real Big So Terrorists Don’t Hate Us? Variety’s take was standard Hollywood PC: “Cruddily crafted, grimacingly performed and effortlessly racist….coldly snarling and vindictive about its sequel’s flag-waving….While North Korea was the enemy in ‘Olympus,’ ‘London’ predictably reverts to familiar Islamophobia….ugly brand of reactionary fear-mongering.” Ignatiy Vishnevetsky of The Onion’s AV Club was strangely not amused and eviscerated the ‘grab bag of dog-whistles and dog-shit filmmaking.’ Metro critic Matt Prigge condescendingly fretted that for conservatives the movie “indulges their worst instincts” while hinting its “Cro-Magnon charm” may have perverse appeal to lefties who want to see actors like Morgan Freeman spout right-wing platitudes. Ignatiy Vishnevetsky of The Onion’s AV Club was strangely not amused, and eviscerated the “grab bag of dog-whistles and dog-shit filmmaking” on his way to awarding an F grade, while describing the movie’s politics as ranging from “tone deaf to irredeemable…dumpster of xenophobia.” The left-wing Independent (UK) ran a full aggrieved news article on the critical hash with a headline that shows just how intimately our cousins understand this vast, diverse country: “London Has Fallen movie condemned as racist ‘terrorsploitation’ for Donald Trump era.” Review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes summed it up: “London Has Fallen traps a talented cast — and all who dare to see it — in a mid-1990s basic-cable nightmare of a film loaded with xenophobia and threadbare action-thriller clichés.” It currently stands at 27 percent positive reviews at Rotten Tomatoes, although 63 percent of actual moviegoers liked it. That’s not a stellar number, but does show a gap between elite opinion and the hoi polloi, who aren’t frittering away their precious time on earth tabulating how many seconds imaginary female princesses get to speak in Disney movies. That Doesn’t Mean You Should See It With respectable opinion lined up against it, one would hope “London Has Fallen” can’t be all bad. Alas, the critics are half-right. You can’t call “London” a good movie (or even a bad one in that “so bad it’s good” vein). Its superficially shocking premise is undone by murky, graceless filming (some of it done on the cheap in Bulgaria), some unconvincing explosions of London landmarks, and a ridiculously durable hero in the form of Butler’s Mike Banning. Watching Butler mowing down dimly illuminated terrorists like so much grass gets rather ridiculous. There are lot of f-words, some slick, sardonic exchanges between Banning and his friend the prez, and a surprising lack of blood. Watching Butler mowing down dimly illuminated terrorists like so much grass gets rather ridiculous, and you began to wonder how the same terror masterminds who came up with the elaborate, expensive, painstakingly planned operation would hire passive lunkheads with sub-Stormtrooper aim to carry it out. Reviewers may be snottily PC in bashing the movie’s “Islamophobia,” though the term “radical Islam” makes not a peep, and Director Babak Najafi is a Swede inconveniently born in Iran. Still, Londoners may rightly take offense at “London Has Fallen’s” portrayal of its MI6 as completely clueless and its security forces as corrupt. But while it may offend English pride, there’s nothing in “London Has Fallen” that should offend an American’s political sensibilities. Only his aesthetic ones. ]]>
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    (Review Source)

Hugh Hewitt1
Salem Radio Network



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Comic Book Movie Palate Cleansing
    (”Olympus Has Fallen” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    It’s Thursday afternoon, it’s still more-or-less summer, and in this morning’s Jolt Jim Geraghty chose to review Suicide Squad. (Well, sufficient time has passed, people have made up their minds on the movie.)  Time for a break from the serious and consequential.  Geraghty, like many other reviewers, pans the movie.  He makes some good points.  I will not say this is a great movie myself.  A friend texted me after seeing it with a one word review, “Meh.”  I’d go with “Meh+.”  I don’t think the movie should be ignored, but I am not going to tell you it is a great movie going experience either. The reviewers that are panning the movie are a generation or two behind me, but still a generation or two ahead of the target audience of the film.  The most enjoyable action movies I have seen in the last several years are the rarely discussed Gerard Butler vehicles Olympus Has Fallen and London Has Fallen.  Obviously they make money or sequels would not happen, but they are not blockbuster films.  They are throwbacks to the 1980’s action flicks and very different from the action films that dominate box offices these days.  The Butler movies are shinier.  The hero is more heroic and the villain more evil – fewer grey lines. Blockbusters are made for young people. Adults, whether old, old like me or just adult like Geraghty can make a film successful, but it takes the youth to make a movie succeed hugely.  Today’s youth like there stories with a lot of grey lines and they like them dark, even when heroic.  This trend has been obvious in comics publishing for quite some time now.  Starting with the publication of The Watchmen comic book miniseries in the 1980’s, our heroes have grown successively darker and darker, and less heroic.  Suicide Squad actually may be the culmination of this trend – no longer is it about flawed heroes, but about heroic villains. I think that many of the purely negative reviews for the Suicide Squad film are coming from people not quite attuned to this trend.  As I say, the movie has it’s faults, but I also think, and the box office attests, that it is hitting the mark pretty right on with blockbuster making audiences. So, specifics… Geraghty complains: Suicide Squad is the third film set in this DC Comics universe, and frankly, it’s far too early for this kind of story. We suddenly learn that super-powered criminals have been running around for a long time, a fact no one felt obligated to mention in Man of Steel or Batman vs. Superman. Everyone seemed stunned by the arrival of aliens in Man of Steel, but they had gotten used to a psychotic clown-faced crime lord, an alligator man living in the sewers and eating people, a hitman who can kill targets with ricochets and a thief who uses boomerangs as weapons. You’re missing the point about Superman, Jim.  Aliens may be new, but what is new and unique about Superman is not that he wears a cape and battles bad guys – it’s his purity.  In Batman v Superman, Batman admits to being a criminal in his vigilante practices.  Batman knows he is tainted, even by his heroic actions.  Superman is something quite different.  With Supes the battles are different on power levels for sure, but also because of how clear the battle lines are.  Superman is clearly good – who the heck knows with Batman.  Perhaps the saddest thing of all is that the world does not trust Supes because he is so apparently good. Geraghty does have a legitimate complaint about the structure of the Suicide Squad.  If you have read the Suicide Squad comics, at their best, they really are Harley Quinn and Deadshot stories.  The movie does not give us enough of these two characters.  Frankly Geraghty’s complaint about the other characters being entirely disposable is dead on to the comic book – they are.  (Including Joker) Everyone that is not Harley and Deadshot exists purely to drive their story forward – the problem in the movie is not enough of those two, not too little of the others.  Waller is Deus Ex Machina so they can set new disposable characters up around Harley and Deadshot.   That is the film’s primary weakness.  Harley and Deadshot are two of the most fascinating characters in comics – very evil, very, very evil, and yet in search of redemption.  (BTW, the comic book has on occasion lost its way making itself about the team or the plot line instead of about developing Harley and Deadshot -so the fact that the film does it is not really surprising.) The film is a pretty good adaptation of the comic book material, at least as these things go.  Printed material, even graphic printed material, can develop a character much better than a film will ever be able to.  Suicide Squad also suffers from the same thing Batman/Superman did which is too much stage setting for the next movie at the cost of the story being told.  When Marvel started this game, they were not sure it would succeed sufficiently to warrant sequels so they poured more into the movie at hand.  The Marvel movies have started to suffer as they have started to work very hard to use this movie to build audience for the next movie.  DC is starting this game in the middle, and suffering the same consequences.  Given the box office, a sequel to Suicide Squad is coming.  Now that Batman/Superman is out on video I have watched it several times – it has grown on me.  (The 1/2 hour longer “Ultimate Version” really does hold together much better than the theatrical version)  I think Suicide Squad will do the same thing.  The great DC movie has not been made yet, but its seeds are apparent in Suicide Squad. In the end I don’t think the problems with Suicide Squad are in the movie, I think they are in the culture.  Not only in a culture that likes its heroes less heroic, but in a culture where the point of these stories is not these stories, but the next story.  It is in an audience that really wants to disappear into these fictional worlds rather than use them to temporarily escape from the current one.  Take the movie for what it is.  Fix the culture. ]]>
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    (Review Source)

Mark Steyn1
Fox News



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Air Force One
    (”Olympus Has Fallen” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Programming note: Mark will be on TV later tonight, Saturday, joining Shannon Bream, Kat Timpf and Tyrus on "The Greg Gutfeld Show", coast to coast across America at 10pm Eastern/7pm Pacific on Fox News. What with all these allegedly exciting
    ...
    (Review Source)

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