Need for Speed

Not rated yet!
Director
Scott Waugh
Runtime
2 h 10 min
Release Date
13 March 2014
Genres
Action, Crime, Drama, Thriller
Overview
The film revolves around a local street-racer who partners with a rich and arrogant business associate, only to find himself framed by his colleague and sent to prison. After he gets out, he joins a New York-to-Los Angeles race to get revenge. But when the ex-partner learns of the scheme, he puts a massive bounty on the racer's head, forcing him to run a cross-country gauntlet of illegal racers in all manner of supercharged vehicles.
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Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Need for Speed
    DramaAction/Adventure We hope this review was both interesting and useful. Please share it with family and friends who would benefit from it as well.Movie ReviewVisit sleepy Mount Kisco, N.Y., and you'll be forgiven for thinking you've gone back in time. That's largely because it's here that vintage car tuner extraordinaire Tobey Marshall and his posse of gifted wrench spinners devote most of their waking resources to resurrecting the hot rods of yesteryear—rides from a time when engines were still measured in cubic inches and motivated by barking four-barrel carburetors. After hours, it's off to the drive-in where hot rod classics like Bullitt play on the big screen, and then to a clandestine street race to see which car—and which driver—has what it takes to win. Wrenching and racing … it seems like a pretty good life to Tobey and his tool mates. But there's a screwdriver hitting the cooling fan. Tobey's garage is on the verge of foreclosure, a secret only he knows. And so Tobey does more than just half-listen when the much-loathed Dino Brewster shows up with a lucrative offer up his sleeve. Dino is another local who nabbed Tobey's ex-girlfriend Anita, and became an IndyCar champ before setting up his own high-end tuning operation in California. No one's happy to see Dino drive up. But he thinks Tobey's is the best outfit in the country to finish work on a very special project: hot rodder extraordinaire Carroll Shelby's uncompleted final Mustang with Ford. Dino thinks they can get $2 million for the 900-horsepower monster when it's done. And he promises to give a quarter to Tobey's garage. It's an offer the cash-strapped and struggling mechanic-cum-racer can't afford to refuse. Dino actually manages to fetch $2.7 million for the fabled car—with payment made by a rich business magnate and negotiated by his beautiful assistant, Julia Maddon. And that's when screwdriver No. 2 starts to twist. Dino invites Tobey and the youngest member of his crew, Petey, to go for a spin in three Swedish Koenigsegg Agera supercars. And he ups the ante: Beat him on the road, and he'll give Tobey the full $2.7 million. Lose, and Tobey surrenders his quarter. Tobey, of course, isn't about to say no to a race. And Dino, of course, isn't about to lose. Even if he has to take out Petey in a fiery accident to win—a murderous act he then pins on Tobey. Two years later, Tobey gets out of prison, determined to prove that Dino killed Petey. The only way to get justice, he believes, is to enter a top-secret (and illegal) road race that Dino's participating in. It's dubbed DeLeon, and it's sponsored annually by a former racer known only as Monarch. But it's invite only. And to get an invite, you have to get Monarch's attention. To get Monarch's attention, you've got to have a fast car with some YouTube exploits to prove it. Even then, Tobey's got only 48 hours to drive from New York to California, where he thinks this year's race is being held. Easy peasy. Because, after all, Tobey already knows exactly what car he needs: the Mustang. And it turns out the new owner is game to loan it to him … on one condition: Julia has to ride along.Positive ElementsJustice is the endgame here, and if you completely overlook all the illegal racing that's going on to get to that goal, you can hand out compliments to Julia and the three guys from the garage for lending a hand. Anita, too, finally realizes what a louse her boyfriend is and gives Tobey critical information to help him prove Dino's guilt. [Spoiler Warning] It's also great to see moments of self-sacrifice, like when Tobey decides to rescue Dino from the wreckage of another explosive crash when he could have just let his nemesis burn. And the fact that Tobey gets arrested again after the DeLeon at least offers the suggestion that he's being punished for his illegal activities.Spiritual ContentPetey's funeral service features a pastor reading verses from Isaiah 41, including the lines "Fear not, be not dismayed, for I am your God," "Those who war against you will be as nothing," and "Fear not, I will help you." One car gets dubbed a "chariot of the gods." Twice we hear "Godspeed."Sexual ContentYoung women at a street race wear short shorts paired with tiny tops that bare cleavage and midriff. Tobey's crew uses a camera to zoom in on the jiggling forms of three female joggers. While quitting his office job, Finn (one of Tobey's guys) strips to just socks, leaving his clothing strewn behind him as startled onlookers stare. (The camera repeatedly shows his bare rear.) In the elevator, an older woman looks down at Finn's crotch, prompting him to quip, "It's cold in here." When Finn's asked why he did it, he says it was to make sure he could never go back to the job again. We see a couple kiss, and it's implied that they're want to go quite a bit further than that.Recommended ResourceA Chicken's Guide to Talking Turkey With Your Kids About SexKevin LemanEven the bravest parents feel timid about discussing sex with their 8- to 14-year-olds! This resource offers reassuring, humorous, real-life anecdotes along with reliable information to help you with this challenging task.Buy NowViolent ContentNeed for Speed is chockfull of high-speed and very dangerous racing, with crashes galore and many, many innocent and uninvolved drivers being forced to take evasive action. When Tobey goes the wrong way on a freeway (sometimes the racers get up to speeds of 270 mph), the results are predictably destructive. Dino purposefully bumps Petey's car, sending it flipping into the air. Many rolls later and on fire, it flies off a bridge, then explodes. Tobey clips a homeless man's grocery cart, destroying it (and prompting jokes about it). One cataclysmic street skirmish, this time with police in Detroit, gets filmed and uploaded to YouTube. The reward for all the recklessness? Monarch sees the clip and welcomes Tobey to participate in the DeLeon. Thugs try to force Tobey and Julia off the road, using shotgun blasts to "persuade" them. Several of those attackers, not surprisingly, end up dying in explosive crashes. A crash in California flips the car Tobey and Julia are in, bloodying both of them and landing Julia in the hospital with a broken arm and concussion. Tobey ties a chain to a policeman's car, ripping off the rear axle of the vehicle when he tries to pursue. The DeLeon race obliterates five of the six cars participating in it, along with numerous pursuing police cars. Several of the crashes involving the police are quite serious, and we hear radio calls for aid for the injured officers. After dragging Dino from the burning wreckage of his flipped Lamborghini, Tobey makes sure he's OK … then punches him in the face. Crude or Profane LanguageOne muffled f-word. A dozen-plus uses of the s-word. Two misuses of Jesus' name and half-a-dozen of God's. Six or seven uses each of "a‑‑," "h‑‑‑" and "b‑‑ch." "B‑‑tards" is tossed in once, as is "douche bag." We hear four or five crude slang terms for the male anatomy ("balls," "nut sack") and see one obscene hand gesture made by a woman mocking a man's "size."Drug and Alcohol ContentEmpty beer bottles sit in Tobey's shop. We see folks drinking wine and champagne.Other Negative ElementsA particularly perilous stunt involves refueling the Mustang while zipping down the freeway. Julia hangs out the window of the car while one of Tobey's friends in a truck feeds a hose to her. Afterward, the guy stands atop the truck (it's still moving) and raises his hands in victory. Note that most of the time, cops are made to look like annoying buffoons here. And at one point, Monarch tells his online audience, "Racers should race. Cops should eat donuts." One guy instructs another not to "soil your panties."ConclusionNeed for Speed is not a movie about the subtle nuances of character transformation. It's a souped-up, turbocharged melodrama with the struggling Good Guy facing off against the nefarious 'n' dastardly Bad Guy, with a damsel who eventually manages to end up in distress plopped down into the passenger seat. There's not much more than that going on here, really. And in an almost cartoonish (read: video game-ish) way, the movie asks us not to think too deeply (or at all) about Tobey's breakneck, utterly illegal cross-country sprint to make sure Dino gets what's coming to him. If you've owned a video game console recently, there's a good chance you've played one of the 20-plus Need for Speed titles that Electronic Arts has published since the franchise's inception back in 1994. Since then, EA has sold a combined 150 million units, making the series the most popular racing franchise of all time. No doubt DreamWorks and Disney are counting on that built-in marketing advantage when it comes to this big-screen adaptation. Tobey takes the games' devil-may-care approach to careening through traffic at obscene speeds, with never so much as an afterthought being proffered for those trying desperately to get out of his (and other racers') way. And the fact that several of the cars he drives (most notably that rocket-like Mustang) sport heads-up displays projecting aforementioned obscene speeds on the windshield only helps to reinforce the story's video game credentials. Yes, Tobey gets locked up again in the end. Yes, the movie's producers have dutifully tacked a big ol' "DON'T TRY THIS AT HOME, KIDS!" disclaimer onto the closing credits, a tardy and ultimately timid attempt to remind impressionable or unstable moviegoers that what they've just seen really is a fantasy, not something they should go out and imitate. Still, it's not hard to see how this movie, just like its go-fast soul mates in the Fast & Furious franchise, could nevertheless inspire teens (and teens at heart) who have fast rides to see just how far they push down that pedal, too. (And who cares about those goody-good cops, the movie snipes.) If they get in trouble or hurt innocent bystanders along the way, they'll quickly learn that life isn't a video game—even if some movies are. Pro-social ContentObjectionable ContentSummary AdvisoryPlot SummaryChristian BeliefsOther Belief SystemsAuthority RolesProfanity/ViolenceKissing/Sex/HomosexualityDiscussion TopicsAdditional Comments/NotesEpisode Reviews]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

John Hanlon2
John Hanlon Reviews



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Need for Speed
    For those who thought The Fast and the Furious films were too realistic, Need for Speed is the movie for you. The car drama boasts blatantly obvious dialogue, clichéd characters and a lack of reality that would be astonishing in most other...
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • The Movies of 2014
    (”Need for Speed” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The end of 2014 is quickly approaching. With that in mind, page I went back and created a list of all of the films that I reviewed this year and the different ratings I gave them. Of course, this this isn’t a complete list of all of the films I saw this year. It’s...
    ...
    (Review Source)

Michael Medved1



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Need for Speed
    ...
    (Review Source)

Debbie Schlussel1
The New York Post



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Weekend Box Office: Need for Speed, The Bag Man, Jimmy P.
    Blog Posts Movie Reviews Jimmy P.“: If the most left-wing anti-American college anthropology professor made a movie and insisted you see it, it would be this horribly long, boring, pointless waste of time. High-quality Gitmo torture. Just awful. “Based on a true story,” Jimmy P. is an American Indian, er . . . “Native American!” played by Benicio Del Toro (yes, I know he’s Puerto Rican, but apparently the casting director thinks “they all look alike,” or something.) Jimmy P. is an Indian who fought in World War II and suffers headaches and nightmares because of a wartime injury. Because he’s a Blackfoot Indian, the Veterans Administration gets a faux-French anthropologist of Mojave Indians (apparently, they are similar to the Blackfoot) to try to help him. Soon, we are taken on ridiculous, boring, and sleep-inducing tangents into the anthropologist’s life, his married girlfriend’s life, and her husband in France’s life. I could not have cared less about any of them or their stuff. Then, we’re taken back to the Indian dude, who describes his weird sexual experiences and traumas as a kid on the reservation and his refusal to marry the mother of his child. Then, the anthropologist gives a lecture to the V.A. doctors about the Indian’s penis envy. Oy vey. Why on earth did I sit through this weird bleep? There can only be one reason: So. You. Don’t. Have. To. TWO-AND-A-HALF MARXES ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

The Federalist Staff1
The Federalist



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Why Disney And Steven Spielberg Will Never Work Together Again
    (”Need for Speed” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The release of “The BFG” has many people (mostly marketers) excited at the collaboration between director Steven Spielberg and Disney Studios. Two esteemed names in family entertainment are coming together to deliver an adaption of a children’s classic from author Roald Dahl. What seems like a natural partnership has never taken place before, and the economic forces of their industry have basically stipulated it may never happen again. Casual audience members may regard the legendary director and the family studio titan as natural partners. Fact is, it is a strange collaboration when you consider Spielberg has his own studio (DreamWorks) with its own animation division. While Disney has had a longstanding distribution deal with DreamWorks and despite teaming up with Spielberg, it announced last fall that contract will expire this August. That is but one curiosity in the ever-evolving financial backstory involving these two entities. The competition between these “partners” has always been present, and it means that getting the movie completed is no small wonder. The marriage bringing “The BFG” onscreen this Friday will culminate in divorce in just a few months. A Partnership Doomed From the Beginning Spielberg famously created his new studio in 1994 with two other Hollywood figureheads: record and film mogul David Geffen and longtime studio executive Jefferey Katzenberg. Katzenberg had rejuvenated Disney in both animation and live-action titles throughout the 1980s and had just resigned from the company when he teamed with Spielberg, a sign Disney would be ever-present on their young studio’s horizon. DreamWorks, as a fundamental partner with Universal Studios, found enough early success to create its own animated film division (DreamWorks Animation). Following a deal with Paramount, DreamWorks Studio entered into a financing arrangement with Reliance, an investment firm from India. The segregated live-action division entered into a distribution deal with Disney in 2009. That partnership has not been fruitful. While some titles had a measure of success, more common have been notable thuds, such as “Fright Night” or “Need For Speed.” Then there was the execrable scud “Cowboys And Aliens.” Perhaps the House of Mouse developed an antagonistic attitude as a result of these monetary shortfalls. Meanwhile, in 2014 Katzenberg was shopping the DreamWorks Animation side for a buyer. After a Japanese offer fell through, he nearly had deal brokered with Hasbro that November. The toymaker has not only licensed its properties for motion pictures (such as “Transformers,” “G.I. Joe,” and “Battleship”), it has also developed its own production division. The desire to have an animation outlet for its licensed products was obvious and would have been a blessing. Until the Mouse showed up. Just days after announcing the possible merger, Hasbro cut off the negotiations. The reason? Disney executives approached the toy producer in opposition, lest it be considered a competitor. Hasbro suits crunched the numbers: the company had not only generous arrangements involving Marvel and Star Wars characters, but a new contract set to cover the lucrative Disney Princess ensemble. Walking away from DreamWorks was sound, given these Disney deals amount to one-third of Hasbro’s business. But don’t cry for Jefferey and Steven. Two weeks ago, regulators approved the purchase of their division by Universal’s parent company, Comcast. By combining DWA with Comcast’s Illumination Entertainment (makers of “The Minions”), the communication giant aims to become competitive with Disney in animation. That would explain the valuation of the purchase price—Comcast dropped $3.9 billion on the studio. Does that sound like it overpaid? Indeed. For perspective, when Disney purchased the more dependable Star Wars franchise, the price tag was $4 billion. Not only is DreamWorks of lower value, Comcast is buying a DreamWorks Animation unit with just a many problems as diamonds in the vault. So Much for That Promise “Entertainment is one of the bright spots of our economy,” said President Obama from the parking lot of the DreamWorks Animation campus in November 2013. “The gap between what we can do and what other countries can do is enormous. That’s worth cheering for.” This was not the first time Obama could be accused of being tone-deaf to economic realities. That day the president was visiting Katzenberg, one of his biggest campaign contributors, and taking a tour of the facilities. Considering Katzenberg had helped raise nearly half a million in cash for his elections, you can see why Obama would lavish praise on the man and his company. You cannot see how he was accurate, however. Just weeks following the upbeat speech, hundreds of DreamWorks employees drove off that same parking lot for the last time, laid off by the studio. Katzenberg also made a startling announcement soon after: he would close the nearby PDI studio, a longstanding animation office complex DWA took over in the 1990s. There was an even starker reality behind these moves. Obama had campaigned in 2012 on policies of preserving American jobs, and castigated opponent Mitt Romney for supposedly “outsourcing” work to other nations. After Obama’s upbeat speech, Katzenberg was slashing workers and closing offices in the United States, but not abroad. Opposite to claims from the man he financially backed for high office, DWA scaled back its release schedule and began farming out more animation work on future films to divisions in Canada and Asia. Comcast bought into a company truncating its releases and sitting on successes tied to tired franchises. Following those layoffs, the studio saw losses from it release “Mr. Peabody and Sherman,” the third title of its last four releases to lead to a write-down in stock reports. Those fortunes have recently improved, with “Home” and “Kung Fu Panda 3” becoming money makers, but those were released one full year apart. If Comcast expects to use a depleted DreamWorks to compete with Disney, it is a very long-range plan. It would take years just to get the DWA release schedule back to a more active level. In the meantime, Disney is in such a good position it may not even be regarding Spielberg’s “The BFG” as a lynchpin for its release calendar. Disney recently shattered the record for the fastest-ever to earn $1 billion at the box office in a year. More impressively, that feat took place a full five weeks before “Finding Dory” had been released to record-breaking numbers. ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

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