Monsters, Inc.

Not rated yet!
Director
Pete Docter
Runtime
1 h 32 min
Release Date
1 November 2001
Genres
Animation, Comedy, Family
Overview
James Sullivan and Mike Wazowski are monsters, they earn their living scaring children and are the best in the business... even though they're more afraid of the children than they are of them. When a child accidentally enters their world, James and Mike suddenly find that kids are not to be afraid of and they uncover a conspiracy that could threaten all children across the world.
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Crosswalk3
Cross Walk



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Monsters, Inc.
    Movies from Film Forum, 11/08/01Pixar, the studio that set a new standard for family entertainment with the spectacular and successful Toy Story franchise and A Bug's Life, have another #1 hit: Monsters, Inc. Monsters got a huge marketing push, guaranteeing it would open impressively. But is this Pixar product good enough maintain the studio's impeccable reputation?Monsters tells the story of two beasties in Monstropolis, Mike (voiced by Billy Crystal) and Sulley (John Goodman). Sulley is the city's top "Scarer," meaning he steps through portal doors and into childrens' bedrooms to scare the living daylights out of them at night. Mike stands guard, collects each child's screams in a vial, and adds them to Monstropolis's power supply. You see, the city is fueled by fear. But when a little toddler crosses over from our world into the monsters' fear factory, panic breaks out. Children, the monsters believe, are toxic. Sulley and Mike, fearing for their jobs, get busy trying to return the girl to her bedroom before they lose their jobs, and before a nasty, centipede-like monster named Randall kidnaps her for his own purposes. Things get complicated when the little gibberish-talking kid (they call her "Boo) gets to Sulley's heart, which is as big, soft, and fuzzy as he is. Sending Boo back might not be so easy after all.Critics seem to agree that this production isn't as good as the Toy Story movies. But that doesn't mean they're panning it. Religious media critics who strive to shield us from seeing or hearing any evil can't find fault with Monsters, Inc. John Evans (whose review appears at The Dove Foundation and Preview) calls it "refreshingly free of any suggestive elements, foul language or crude humor" and thus "a welcome addition to family entertainment."Steven Issac (Focus on the Family) promises, "The adorable Boo will win over every parents' heart the moment they meet her. And nowhere to be seen are the fiends of sexual content, profane language and substance abuse."Others take the time to consider the quality of the craftsmanship and storytelling. Michael Elliott (Christian Critic) says the movie "is driven and driven well by its story and the characters which tell it." googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-1'); }); Ted Baehr and Tom Snyder (Movieguide) co-review the film: "Pixar's team of writers, animators, and actors … have proven, once again, that it's story and characters that matter most. Their message is full of love, laughter, fun, and friendship, flavored with a dash of bravery and courage."Others find a fault or two. "The story, though imaginative, doesn't take full advantage of the concept of things that go bump in the night," says the U.S. Catholic Conference.J. Robert Parks (The Phantom Tollbooth) found some of the movie manipulative and sentimental. He also found some scenes "unintentionally creepy. A recurring sub-plot involves faceless monsters in haz-mat suits who are continually decontaminating areas where the little girl has been. In the midst of the anthrax scare, it was impossible not to be distracted by the similarities to images on the news." But he notes that the movie might give parents a way to talk with children about current events. "In that way, it might somehow calm their fears."Mainstream critics were pleased, but not bowled over. Mark Caro (Chicago Tribune) argues, "Shrek … seemed to be trying to appeal to everybody without providing a consistent tone or message for anybody. Monsters, Inc. … knows its audience of the young and the young at heart. And it offers a lesson that seems particularly apt these days: Scaring kids may be inevitable, but making them laugh is a lot more satisfying."MaryAnn Johanson (The Flick Filosopher) praises "the quiet and unshowy but loving attention paid to each individual hair in Sulley's fur." She feels the film "is aimed more at the kiddies: it's simpler, sweeter, less deeply affecting. The Toy Story films … are more about the adult nostalgia for childhood than they are about the circumstance of being a child—Monsters touches more on the concerns of childhood that we outgrow and forget: being afraid of monsters, and learning to let go of that fear." googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-2'); }); if (gptClientWidth >= 992 && gptClientWidth <= 1000000) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-3'); }); I had a good time with Monsters, Inc. But Billy Crystal's performance as Mike joined a large number of recent animated characters that give a comedian the freedom to ramble on relentlessly with hit-and-miss humor. (This started with Robin Williams in Aladdin.) The Toy Story movies showed us believable friendships, but I kept wondering why Sulley runs around with this whining jabbermouth. If the movie had focused more on storytelling and less on one-liners, the relationship between little Boo and her monster (the most effective and moving element in the movie) might have become even more interesting. Still, there aren't many films around right now that are as harmless and hilarious for the whole family. So go ahead—treat your kids, and yourself. ]]>
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    (Review Source)
  • Monsters, Inc. Scares Up Laughs
    Movies Rating - G Best for: This is a kid-friendly movie for kids who can handle a few scary monsters. What it's about: Sulley (John Goodman) is the top "scarer" at Monsters, Inc., where a factory of monsters (in all shapes and sizes) works to keep kids screaming to provide their power supply. Mike (Billy Crystal) is a one-eyed green monster who teams up with Sulley to expose their greedy rival Randall Boggs (Steve Buscemi), a scheming, eight-legged creature who can turn invisible. The monster world is turned upside down when a little girl is inadvertently transported there and all of the monsters are terrified of her touch (since they think it is poisonous). It's up to Mike and Sulley to prove them wrong and get the girl back to her home. The good: Pixar (the group behind Toy Story) has once again come through with special effects that give us an alternate world where mostly benign, goofy-looking monsters look so real they're almost cuddly. These are the monsters that kids think they see at night in their room and in dark places, but none of them would ever harm a child. From the beginning we see sketches of monsters with large jaws and teeth and long arms with claws hiding in and popping out of closets, but it's soon clear that the main message to the story is laughs are much more powerful than screams. The not-so-good: The opening scene with its suspenseful music and relatable situation, might be unsettling, suspenseful or scary to some younger children, but soon they will see the likable side to these monsters. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-1'); }); Offensive language: Verbal jabs at each other with slang comments that some kids aren't allowed to say ("You idiot," "Jerk," "Stupid," "Shut up") Sexual situations: None Violence: Mostly adventure action where Mike and Sulley hang onto and jump from various doors zipping along on a suspended, factory-style assembly line. Parental advisory: I'm not a fan of making monsters attractive to kids and luring them to "accept" dark themes, but in this case, the reverse psychology of monsters being afraid of kids just might work. Still, there may be a few kids (depending on their age and level of maturity) who find the opening scenes a little scary and "bad dream" material. At least the theme is a positive one that in the end has kids laughing. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-2'); }); if (gptClientWidth >= 992 && gptClientWidth <= 1000000) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-3'); }); Entertainment value: A- ]]>
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    (Review Source)
  • 10 Fun, Family-Friendly Scary Movies for Halloween
    A survey by LifeWay Research several years ago found that Christians are divided over the celebration of Halloween. Most (54 percent) said it was all in good fun, while 18 percent celebrated it but without the pagan elements and 23 percent avoided it altogether.
    ...
    (Review Source)

Conservative Film Buff2
Letterboxd



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)
  • Monsters, Inc.

    ★★★★★ Added

    What a pleasant surprise it was to return to this masterfully simple film, made at a time when Pixar was at its best.

    I had given it a 5-Star rating in the past based on nostalgic memories of watching it in the early 2000s. I hadn’t seen it since. I’m happy to report that after this rewatch, it has earned that rating anew with fresh eyes.

    And, come on, it deserves it—the simplicity of its concept, the genuine emotional moments,… more

    2 likes

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    (Review Source)
  • Pixar Ranked
    (”Monsters, Inc.” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    1. The Incredibles

      This is one of the best animated films ever made, one of the best superhero films ever made, and I'm putting it at the top of the list of Pixar animated features. The action is great, but it's the family moments that feel so right. This one gets better as you age, and can relate more to the relationship moments. It's full of ideas, genuine emotion, great characters, amazing art direction, and fabulously efficient filmmaking. Truly a stellar film.

    2. Toy Story

      Neck-and-neck with The Incredibles, I ultimately and reluctantly decided I had to put Toy Story at no. 2. I can't find any fault with this groundbreaking, genre defining, world-changing film, so in the end, I decided it lost to The Incredibles by a smidge because The Incredibles's plot plays out a little less formulaic. Sure, Toy Story gets extra points for defining the Pixar formula, but the formula is felt more in retrospect than it is for Incredibles. This is very subjective stuff, but that's all I got.

    3. Ratatouille

      Also neck-and-neck with the nos. 1 and 2, Ratatouille is a close third. It's a great and original story, and told expertly by Bird, whose direction here is really something. Every beat of the story hits home, leading up to a glorious finish that has the hard-of-heart food critic finding love in his work again through the least-expected, and lowliest, of means.

    4. Monsters, Inc.

      A simple but ingenious concept executed with humor and heart. Also, it put Billy Crystal and John Goodman together in starring roles, with Steve Buscemi as the villain. And the door chase sequence! What more could you want?

    5. Incredibles 2

      Not your typical Pixar sequel, this is very much a Brad Bird film first and foremost. The action scenes are extraordinarily staged and executed to the extent that this is the best action film in years. The comedy feels like Chuck Jones at parts (the raccoon and Jack-Jack). Even so, character remains at the forefront as we see Mr. Incredible and Elastigirl learning to master their new roles.  Bird builds and improvises on themes in a what like an improvisatory way, the same way that Giacchino’s jazzy score does. It’s a ride from start to finish.

    6. A Bug's Life

      Pixar's second feature film is underrated and simply not talked about enough. It takes its story beats from Kurosawa's Seven Samurai, which had already been retold by The Magnificent Seven and in other places. But what Pixar does with it is fresh, full of some of Pixar's best humor, and does an amazing job of establishing each of the characters in ways that cause us to easily relate to them. Randy Newman's score is pure Americana and adds a grand feel. As far as I'm concerned, this is the best remake of Seven Samurai.

    7. Cars

      A charming, small movie that tackles great subjects. You can feel director Lasseter's love of cars and his feeling of nostalgia for a golden age gone by. It feels personal and real.

    8. WALL·E

      Wall-E, like Ratatouille, is a strange idea for a film that I can imagine caused some discomfort among studio execs. Just think, they put big money into a movie that stars two robots that can't really talk, and don't have faces with which to emote or relate, and basically the first half of the movie is a silent film. Sounds like a great idea for a kids' movie, right? I appreciate the guts and vision that went into this, and I find myself deeply involved with the two main characters when I watch it, which is a great feat of filmmaking. Even so, the films does lose points for getting preachy and political.

    9. Coco

      The best example of world-building in the Pixar canon and a wonderful and unique story. Too predictable, but the music is fantastic and you have to love the themes of the importance of remembering family.

    10. Monsters University

      A really fun movie and an enjoyable sequel whose only major fault is its predictability, that is until the very end, which allows the main characters to experience failure. Instead of abandoning arcs from the first like other Pixar sequels, this expands on them. The best Pixar sequel after Incredibles 2.

    ...plus 10 more. View the full list on Letterboxd.

    ...
    (Review Source)

Plugged In2
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Monsters, Inc.
    ComedySci-Fi/FantasyKidsAnimationAction/Adventure We hope this review was both interesting and useful. Please share it with family and friends who would benefit from it as well.Movie ReviewAt 9:00 p.m. each night, your closet door ceases to function as a closet door. It becomes instead a gateway to the netherworld. A porthole to the land of monsters. But then, if you're under the age of 8, you already knew that. The rest of this is for your parents. On the other side of that closet door lies a huge city filled with monsters of every color, stripe and claw. A one-eyed head bobs on pencil-thin legs (Mike). A giant purple and green fur-covered beast (Sulley) rattles the walls. A Raptor-style lizard (Randall) lurks and snarls. Cleverly enough, electricity for "Monstropolis" is generated by capturing and processing the screams of scared little children. So a great number of the monsters work for the power company—Monsters, Inc. They sneak through those closet doors, scaring not-quite-asleep little boys and girls. "We scare because we care," reads the slogan above the factory doors. What no one knows in human-land is that monsters are as scared of little kids as little kids are of monsters. Sulley, Mike, Randall and Co. have been taught since they were wee beastie babes that humans are toxic. So the second a child makes a move, the monsters retreat. Imagine the panic and comedy that ensues in Monstropolis, then, when a little girl (Boo) sneaks through her door and attaches herself to Sulley.Positive ElementsThe bottom line here is: Children needn't fear the dark. They needn't stare wide-eyed and sleepless at their closet doors, anxiously waiting for what might emerge. Imagination is fun, we're told, but it shouldn't make you scared. I should present this caution right up front, though. Depending on how kids process fantasy cartoons, Monsters, Inc. will either cure them of fright forever or give their trembling brains more fearful fodder. The ultimate message is one of safety, kindness, love and friendship, but the path there is occasionally troubled by scary turns. What else sends good vibrations? 1) Healthy oral hygiene. Even monsters brush their teeth, we're shown. And we hear that "good monsters don't have plaque." 2) Friendship. Mike and Sulley are great buds, and their comradeship is reflected in the song lyric, "I wouldn't have nothin' if I didn't have you." Sulley's growing affection for Boo is also very sweet and touching. Indeed, he begins to take care of her even before he realizes he doesn't have to be scared of her. 3) Doing the right thing even if it's costly. Sulley and Mike squabble, but end up advocating for each other and sacrificing for each other. Along the way, they expose and fight back against an evil plot that would harm children if it weren't stopped. 4) Romance. Mike sees love in his future. Better yet, his intentions are nothing short of noble, and his actions always honorable. 5) Making the best of a bad situation. Mike twice refuses to get upset when he's not given his full due or is inadvertently hidden from the limelight. 6) Good sportsmanship. Sulley's competition with Randall to see who is the best scarer shows Randall cheating to get ahead … but Sulley, our hero, placidly proclaiming, "May the best monster win."Spiritual ContentSexual ContentNone.Violent ContentScary for a 4-year-old. Nothing but fun and games for a tween. Downright silly in the eyes of a teen. Monsters roar. They skulk. They startle. One scene in particular that will alarm some children has one fearsome monster battering down a door to attack Sulley and Mike. It's a noisy scene, designed to raise the hair on the back of your neck. Additionally, a nightmarish machine built to "extract screams" is tried out more than once. We see the fear in the eyes of those facing it. And we see the red and puffy lips of a monster who has been dazed and damaged (not quite killed) by the force of its menacing nozzle. Boo whimpers and cries when confronting it. The monsters are prone to fighting one another from time to time. Sometimes for fun. Other times in the grip of an evil rage. Invisible when he chooses to be, Randall attacks Sulley. Sulley fights back. Blows rain down on both of them. Randall slams Mike against a wall and twists his arms into a painful position. In turn, Mike slams a door on Randall fingers, yelling, "I hope that hurt, lizard-boy!" Even Boo gets in on the action and beats Randall over the head with a toy baseball bat. We see a silhouette of Randall getting bludgeoned with a shovel. Several monsters slap others to either get their attention or try to hurt them. Sulley slides, tumbles and crashes down a snow-packed mountain. And the whole gang goes for a wild ride on fast-moving conveyer belts strung high in the air. Mike's fingers get painfully pinched in a slammed window. He intentionally crunches his crotch down on a beam to try to solicit laughs from Boo. On a more psychological plane, Sulley goes though a few moments when he thinks Boo has been killed in a mammoth trash compactor. He (and we) sees parts of her costume sticking out of a compacted block of garbage; he faints from the shock. Moviegoers know she's fine, but watching his anguish and contemplating the idea that she might have somehow been crushed in such a manner will sober more than a few … moms and dads.Crude or Profane Language"What the …!?" trails off twice. Name-calling includes "creep," "idiot," "jerk," "dope," "butterball" and "stupid, pathetic waste."Drug and Alcohol ContentNone.Other Negative ElementsPretending to be a stand-up comic, Mike swallows a microphone and burps ferociously. He sprays disinfectant in his eye. And hiding from the bad monsters in a bathroom, he sticks his foot in the toilet and then walks out of the room dragging toilet paper behind him. One monster is known as Mr. Bile ("My friends call me Phlegm").ConclusionIt's the almost unbearably adorable Boo chanting "Mike Shushowski! Mike Shushowski!" who will win over parents' hearts the moment they meet her in this movie. It's the hilarious goofball Mike who'll grab the tweenage boys. And it's great big furry Sulley who'll sweet-talk the girls. But it's not just the cute, cuddly and fun factor that works so well here: Monsters, Inc. actually has a fair amount of heft when you start to break apart its life-lesson themes (as I have in "Positive Elements" above). Loyalty. Love. Friendship. Making good decisions. Standing up for what's right, even when what's right seems at first to go against everything your culture tells you is correct. Bravery in the face of dark closet recesses. And nowhere to be seen are the beastly fiends of sexual content, profanity and substance abuse. Indeed, a bit of G-rated fantasy/slapstick violence is really the only thing that's even close to scary about Monsters, Inc. But it's still something that's worth working through on the front-end … before your tyke takes the wrong lesson away from the "scare floor" and starts triple-checking her closet door seven times a night.Pro-social ContentObjectionable ContentSummary AdvisoryPlot SummaryChristian BeliefsOther Belief SystemsAuthority RolesProfanity/ViolenceKissing/Sex/HomosexualityDiscussion TopicsAdditional Comments/NotesEpisode Reviews]]>
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    (Review Source)
  • Inside Out: Will It Be One of Pixar's Best?
    (”Monsters, Inc.” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Inside Out, Pixar’s newest film, is coming out tomorrow. You can read our full review later today, but the other reviews I’ve seen have been, safe to say, glowing. Not that we expect anything less of Pixar, Disney’s wildly inventive animation adjunct. Ever since the studio blasted to prominence with 1995’s Toy Story, Pixar has churned out classic after classic. And here’s the interesting thing: Almost everyone seems to have a favorite Pixar movie. During the screening of Inside Out, I asked some folks sitting around me what theirs was. “Toy Story,” one mother said. “Finding Nemo!” her daughter chimed in. I heard Cars and The Incredibles and Toy Story 3 and Up. The main takeaway, of course, is that Pixar makes some pretty good movies. They take on ticklish themes like loss and grief and turn them into compelling, freakishly enjoyable works of art. And their messages are so responsible that they even make the crankiest of Plugged In reviewers smile. Nothing lasts forever, of course, and Pixar will eventually crank out something that doesn’t engender universal squeals of glee. (Some would say Cars 2 might’ve been Pixar’s first clunker, actually.) But today—just for fun—I thought I’d give you my own Top Five list of my favorite Pixar flicks. Up. With all due respect to Brave, this might be Pixar’s bravest flick. It’s a rare studio indeed that would feature a grouchy old man as a hero for its animated “kid” flick. Or that it would try to make its audience cry in the first 15 minutes. But that’s what Up does, and it does so beautifully. (Plus, the dog Doug is a hoot.) Finding Nemo. Even after watching it a half-dozen times, this movie just doesn’t get old. This charming father-son story is taut, touching and—mainly thanks to the antics of the blue tang fish Dory—laugh-out-loud funny. When I was at Walt Disney World recently, I regularly walked past a hotel decorated with the seagulls from Nemo, and every now and then they’d all break into a cacophony of “mine!” I giggled every single time. WALL-E. Only Pixar, I think, could take a musical clip from Hello Dolly!, an overcooked and emotionless musical from 1969, and infuse it with genuine heart and melancholy—courtesy a vocabularily-impaired robot, of all things. I’ve only seen this flick once, but just writing this paragraph makes me want to watch it again. Toy Story. Some people say that its two sequels are superior, and they are both great in their own ways. But I have a soft spot for the original. This was Pixar’s introduction to most of us, I think, and it still feels pretty magical. The interplay between Woody and Buzz is priceless, and the message is surprisingly deep: Buzz’s realization that he’s “just a toy” is something that many of us can feel when we realize we might not land in the NFL or on Broadway—but can still can have a pretty awesome, and even heroic, life. Monsters, Inc. Surprised? Me too, actually. I was pretty sure I was going to wind this list with The Incredibles (being the superhero geek I am). But remembering fearsome beastie Sulley learning to care for and even love the “dangerous” little girl Boo, and thinking over the (semi-cliched but very biblical) message that love and laughter is more powerful than fear, I had to give the last slot to the blue-haired guy and his one-eyed wise-cracking pal. Will Inside Out land in this Top 5 list someday? I can’t answer that just yet. For now, I just hope I didn’t miss any of your favorites. But if I did, let me know below. ]]>
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    (Review Source)

John Hanlon1
John Hanlon Reviews



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Monsters, Inc 3D
    It’s been more than a decade since the Pixar animated film “Monsters, help Inc.” first arrived in theaters. And like many of its fellow Pixar classics, this idealistic family film remains as wonderful today as it was back in 2001. This...
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    (Review Source)

PJ Media Staff3
PJ Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • In Defense of Ratatouille
    (”Monsters, Inc.” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Ratatouille Trailer', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); Today my friend Chris Queen -- a fellow member with me in the pop culture cult of Disney -- unveiled his ranking of the 12 Pixar films from worst to best.For the most part his choices drew my sympathy and tolerance, except for one: Chris stuck Ratatouille at second-to-last, ranking even the dull Cars and A Bugs Life superior:Ratatouille begins with two strikes for me. First, the setting in the world of French cuisine — not exactly the most obvious setting for a family movie night. And second, scurrying around an environment you’d want spotless? The main character is a rat.Yes, that’s right: I have a problem with a rodent as the protagonist in a Disney film. Look, I’ll admit that Mickey and Minnie Mouse are cute, classic Disney characters — and it would be sacrilege to suggest anything otherwise. But I still don’t want to see them running around in a commercial kitchen [...]I suppose Ratatouille isn’t a terrible film, but at the same time, it doesn’t exactly stay with me, either. Perhaps if it had been more memorable, it would rank higher on this list. On second thought: maybe not. Not with that disgusting rodent in the kitchen.In the words of the film's antagonist: var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Ratatouille "Highly Suspect!"', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); Chris claims two grievances that are really just his own idiosyncrasies: he rejects the French cuisine setting and finds the idea of a sewer rat protagonist distasteful.But what about those of us who love the Food Network's celebrations of high brow food and who don't suffer a wave of nausea at the thought of a cute cartoon character making our soup? class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2012/5/9/in-defense-of-ratatouille/ previous Page 1 of 2 next   ]]>
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    (Review Source)
  • The Pixar Canon: 4 Misses And 8 Hits
    (”Monsters, Inc.” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Brave "Families Legend" Trailer', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); This June 22, Pixar will release Brave, the studio's 13th animated feature. Brave tells the story of Merida, a Scottish princess who rebels against her royal parents with dire consequences. Even though it may be a bit darker than a typical Pixar production, Brave looks to have the stunning visuals and memorable characterizations that make Pixar films so great.Over the last 26 years Pixar has transformed animation. Partnering with Disney the studio innovated the medium in a way unseen since the days of Walt Disney himself. Many people still thought of computer animation as some sort of sci-fi pipe dream in 1986, but thanks to Pixar, the medium has become the industry standard -- and the company's films now dominate both the box office and critics' yearly top 10 lists.Pixar's dozen productions have met with varying degrees of critical and box office success. I'd say there's no such thing as a bad Pixar film, but some movies have raised the bar exponentially while others have fallen a bit short of the high standards the studio has set. I've compiled a list of the twelve movies ranked from the least to the greatest. Here we go... class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2012/5/9/the-pixar-canon-4-misses-and-8-hits/ previous Page 1 of 13 next   ]]>
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    (Review Source)
  • Pixar's Alternate Universe?
    (”Monsters, Inc.” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle Everybody's a geek about something culturally. For some it's science fiction, while others may geek out over sports. For me, it's Disney culture (don't act so shocked), college sports, and Star Wars. But everybody has something that they're a geek about.Some geeks -- and I'm using the term in a cultural light, rather than referring to nerds or dorks -- go too far in their obsession. Some dress in elaborate costume for events like Comic Con or DragonCon, or even renaissance fairs. (Yes, I realize I'm stepping on some toes here.) Others show it off on their skin. Still others devote months of their time to devising theories on how a certain studio's movies are interconnected. Meet Jon Negroni.By day, Negroni manages social media and SEO for a non-profit organization, and he writes a blog for young professionals. And -- bless his heart -- he's apparently a Pixar fan. Negroni has developed an elaborate theory explaining how all the features in the Pixar canon are related.Several months ago, I watched a fun-filled video on Cracked.com that introduced the idea (at least to me) that all of the Pixar movies actually exist within the same universe. Since then, I’ve obsessed over this concept, working to complete what I call “The Pixar Theory,” a working narrative that ties all of the Pixar movies into one cohesive timeline with a main theme.Negroni's timeline runs as follows:Brave: 14-15th centuriesThe Incredibles: 1950s-60s (...thought that's up for debate, as we'll see...)Toy Story: 1997-1998Toy Story 2: 1999Finding Nemo: 2003Ratatouille: 2007Toy Story 3: 2010Up: 2011-2016Cars, Cars 2: ~2100-2200Wall-E, ~2800-2900A Bug's Life, ~2898-3000Monsters University, Monsters Inc., ~4500-5000...and all of it cycles back to Brave.class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2013/7/26/pixars-alternate-universe/ previous Page 1 of 6 next   ]]>
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    (Review Source)

Kyle Smith1
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • "Up": Funniest Pixar Movie Yet?
    (”Monsters, Inc.” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lou has the scoop on the early reviews of Disney/Pixar’s “Up,” said to be another classic and the funniest Pixar movie yet. They’re showing it to New York critics next Wednesday, I think. Just to rattle Hunter’s cage, my list of favorite Pixar movies in order: 1. Ratatouille 2. Toy Story 2 3. The Incredibles 4. Finding Nemo 5. A Bug’s Life 6. Toy Story 7. Monsters, Inc. 8. Wall-E 9. Cars]]>
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    (Review Source)

John Nolte1
Daily Wire / Breitbart



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • 'Toy Story 4' Review: Another Home Run
    (”Monsters, Inc.” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    My Thursday night show was packed with small kids who were hypnotized for the full 100 minutes, as was I.
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    (Review Source)

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