Monsters, Inc.

Not rated yet!
Director
Pete Docter
Runtime
1 h 32 min
Release Date
1 November 2001
Genres
Animation, Comedy, Family
Overview
James Sullivan and Mike Wazowski are monsters, they earn their living scaring children and are the best in the business... even though they're more afraid of the children than they are of them. When a child accidentally enters their world, James and Mike suddenly find that kids are not to be afraid of and they uncover a conspiracy that could threaten all children across the world.
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Crosswalk3
Cross Walk



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • 10 Fun, Family-Friendly Scary Movies for Halloween
    A survey by LifeWay Research several years ago found that Christians are divided over the celebration of Halloween. Most (54 percent) said it was all in good fun, while 18 percent celebrated it but without the pagan elements and 23 percent avoided it altogether.
    ...
    (Review Source)

Conservative Film Buff2
Letterboxd



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)
  • Pixar Ranked
    (”Monsters, Inc.” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    1. The Incredibles

      This is one of the best animated films ever made, one of the best superhero films ever made, and I'm putting it at the top of the list of Pixar animated features. The action is great, but it's the family moments that feel so right. This one gets better as you age, and can relate more to the relationship moments. It's full of ideas, genuine emotion, great characters, amazing art direction, and fabulously efficient filmmaking. Truly a stellar film.

    2. Toy Story

      Neck-and-neck with The Incredibles, I ultimately and reluctantly decided I had to put Toy Story at no. 2. I can't find any fault with this groundbreaking, genre defining, world-changing film, so in the end, I decided it lost to The Incredibles by a smidge because The Incredibles's plot plays out a little less formulaic. Sure, Toy Story gets extra points for defining the Pixar formula, but the formula is felt more in retrospect than it is for Incredibles. This is very subjective stuff, but that's all I got.

    3. Ratatouille

      Also neck-and-neck with the nos. 1 and 2, Ratatouille is a close third. It's a great and original story, and told expertly by Bird, whose direction here is really something. Every beat of the story hits home, leading up to a glorious finish that has the hard-of-heart food critic finding love in his work again through the least-expected, and lowliest, of means.

    4. Monsters, Inc.

      A simple but ingenious concept executed with humor and heart. Also, it put Billy Crystal and John Goodman together in starring roles, with Steve Buscemi as the villain. And the door chase sequence! What more could you want?

    5. Incredibles 2

      Not your typical Pixar sequel, this is very much a Brad Bird film first and foremost. The action scenes are extraordinarily staged and executed to the extent that this is the best action film in years. The comedy feels like Chuck Jones at parts (the raccoon and Jack-Jack). Even so, character remains at the forefront as we see Mr. Incredible and Elastigirl learning to master their new roles.  Bird builds and improvises on themes in a what like an improvisatory way, the same way that Giacchino’s jazzy score does. It’s a ride from start to finish.

    6. A Bug's Life

      Pixar's second feature film is underrated and simply not talked about enough. It takes its story beats from Kurosawa's Seven Samurai, which had already been retold by The Magnificent Seven and in other places. But what Pixar does with it is fresh, full of some of Pixar's best humor, and does an amazing job of establishing each of the characters in ways that cause us to easily relate to them. Randy Newman's score is pure Americana and adds a grand feel. As far as I'm concerned, this is the best remake of Seven Samurai.

    7. Cars

      A charming, small movie that tackles great subjects. You can feel director Lasseter's love of cars and his feeling of nostalgia for a golden age gone by. It feels personal and real.

    8. WALL·E

      Wall-E, like Ratatouille, is a strange idea for a film that I can imagine caused some discomfort among studio execs. Just think, they put big money into a movie that stars two robots that can't really talk, and don't have faces with which to emote or relate, and basically the first half of the movie is a silent film. Sounds like a great idea for a kids' movie, right? I appreciate the guts and vision that went into this, and I find myself deeply involved with the two main characters when I watch it, which is a great feat of filmmaking. Even so, the films does lose points for getting preachy and political.

    9. Coco

      The best example of world-building in the Pixar canon and a wonderful and unique story. Too predictable, but the music is fantastic and you have to love the themes of the importance of remembering family.

    10. Monsters University

      A really fun movie and an enjoyable sequel whose only major fault is its predictability, that is until the very end, which allows the main characters to experience failure. Instead of abandoning arcs from the first like other Pixar sequels, this expands on them. The best Pixar sequel after Incredibles 2.

    ...plus 10 more. View the full list on Letterboxd.

    ...
    (Review Source)

Plugged In2
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Inside Out: Will It Be One of Pixar's Best?
    (”Monsters, Inc.” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Inside Out, Pixar’s newest film, is coming out tomorrow. You can read our full review later today, but the other reviews I’ve seen have been, safe to say, glowing. Not that we expect anything less of Pixar, Disney’s wildly inventive animation adjunct. Ever since the studio blasted to prominence with 1995’s Toy Story, Pixar has churned out classic after classic. And here’s the interesting thing: Almost everyone seems to have a favorite Pixar movie. During the screening of Inside Out, I asked some folks sitting around me what theirs was. “Toy Story,” one mother said. “Finding Nemo!” her daughter chimed in. I heard Cars and The Incredibles and Toy Story 3 and Up. The main takeaway, of course, is that Pixar makes some pretty good movies. They take on ticklish themes like loss and grief and turn them into compelling, freakishly enjoyable works of art. And their messages are so responsible that they even make the crankiest of Plugged In reviewers smile. Nothing lasts forever, of course, and Pixar will eventually crank out something that doesn’t engender universal squeals of glee. (Some would say Cars 2 might’ve been Pixar’s first clunker, actually.) But today—just for fun—I thought I’d give you my own Top Five list of my favorite Pixar flicks. Up. With all due respect to Brave, this might be Pixar’s bravest flick. It’s a rare studio indeed that would feature a grouchy old man as a hero for its animated “kid” flick. Or that it would try to make its audience cry in the first 15 minutes. But that’s what Up does, and it does so beautifully. (Plus, the dog Doug is a hoot.) Finding Nemo. Even after watching it a half-dozen times, this movie just doesn’t get old. This charming father-son story is taut, touching and—mainly thanks to the antics of the blue tang fish Dory—laugh-out-loud funny. When I was at Walt Disney World recently, I regularly walked past a hotel decorated with the seagulls from Nemo, and every now and then they’d all break into a cacophony of “mine!” I giggled every single time. WALL-E. Only Pixar, I think, could take a musical clip from Hello Dolly!, an overcooked and emotionless musical from 1969, and infuse it with genuine heart and melancholy—courtesy a vocabularily-impaired robot, of all things. I’ve only seen this flick once, but just writing this paragraph makes me want to watch it again. Toy Story. Some people say that its two sequels are superior, and they are both great in their own ways. But I have a soft spot for the original. This was Pixar’s introduction to most of us, I think, and it still feels pretty magical. The interplay between Woody and Buzz is priceless, and the message is surprisingly deep: Buzz’s realization that he’s “just a toy” is something that many of us can feel when we realize we might not land in the NFL or on Broadway—but can still can have a pretty awesome, and even heroic, life. Monsters, Inc. Surprised? Me too, actually. I was pretty sure I was going to wind this list with The Incredibles (being the superhero geek I am). But remembering fearsome beastie Sulley learning to care for and even love the “dangerous” little girl Boo, and thinking over the (semi-cliched but very biblical) message that love and laughter is more powerful than fear, I had to give the last slot to the blue-haired guy and his one-eyed wise-cracking pal. Will Inside Out land in this Top 5 list someday? I can’t answer that just yet. For now, I just hope I didn’t miss any of your favorites. But if I did, let me know below. ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

John Hanlon1
John Hanlon Reviews



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Monsters, Inc 3D
    It’s been more than a decade since the Pixar animated film “Monsters, help Inc.” first arrived in theaters. And like many of its fellow Pixar classics, this idealistic family film remains as wonderful today as it was back in 2001. This...
    ...
    (Review Source)

PJ Media Staff3
PJ Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Pixar's Alternate Universe?
    (”Monsters, Inc.” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle Everybody's a geek about something culturally. For some it's science fiction, while others may geek out over sports. For me, it's Disney culture (don't act so shocked), college sports, and Star Wars. But everybody has something that they're a geek about.Some geeks -- and I'm using the term in a cultural light, rather than referring to nerds or dorks -- go too far in their obsession. Some dress in elaborate costume for events like Comic Con or DragonCon, or even renaissance fairs. (Yes, I realize I'm stepping on some toes here.) Others show it off on their skin. Still others devote months of their time to devising theories on how a certain studio's movies are interconnected. Meet Jon Negroni.By day, Negroni manages social media and SEO for a non-profit organization, and he writes a blog for young professionals. And -- bless his heart -- he's apparently a Pixar fan. Negroni has developed an elaborate theory explaining how all the features in the Pixar canon are related.Several months ago, I watched a fun-filled video on Cracked.com that introduced the idea (at least to me) that all of the Pixar movies actually exist within the same universe. Since then, I’ve obsessed over this concept, working to complete what I call “The Pixar Theory,” a working narrative that ties all of the Pixar movies into one cohesive timeline with a main theme.Negroni's timeline runs as follows:Brave: 14-15th centuriesThe Incredibles: 1950s-60s (...thought that's up for debate, as we'll see...)Toy Story: 1997-1998Toy Story 2: 1999Finding Nemo: 2003Ratatouille: 2007Toy Story 3: 2010Up: 2011-2016Cars, Cars 2: ~2100-2200Wall-E, ~2800-2900A Bug's Life, ~2898-3000Monsters University, Monsters Inc., ~4500-5000...and all of it cycles back to Brave.class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2013/7/26/pixars-alternate-universe/ previous Page 1 of 6 next   ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Kyle Smith1
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • "Up": Funniest Pixar Movie Yet?
    (”Monsters, Inc.” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lou has the scoop on the early reviews of Disney/Pixar’s “Up,” said to be another classic and the funniest Pixar movie yet. They’re showing it to New York critics next Wednesday, I think. Just to rattle Hunter’s cage, my list of favorite Pixar movies in order: 1. Ratatouille 2. Toy Story 2 3. The Incredibles 4. Finding Nemo 5. A Bug’s Life 6. Toy Story 7. Monsters, Inc. 8. Wall-E 9. Cars]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

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