Me and Earl and the Dying Girl

Not rated yet!
Director
Alfonso Gomez-Rejon
Runtime
1 h 45 min
Release Date
12 June 2015
Genres
Comedy, Drama
Overview
Greg is coasting through senior year of high school as anonymously as possible, avoiding social interactions like the plague while secretly making spirited, bizarre films with Earl, his only friend. But both his anonymity and friendship threaten to unravel when his mother forces him to befriend a classmate with leukemia.
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John Hanlon4
John Hanlon Reviews



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
    Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is a movie that could’ve easily fallen into a cinematic trap. The main characters could’ve become one-dimensional and the hardships they face could’ve easily become schmaltzy enterprises that demand tears from...
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    (Review Source)
  • ‘Me and Earl and the Dying Girl’ director on making a personal film
    One of the biggest Sundance hits of 2015 was a small-budget indie comedy about an aspiring high school filmmaker and his friendship with a sick classmate entitled Me and Earl and the Dying Girl.  The film was directed by Alfonso Gomez-Rejon and serves as his second...
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    (Review Source)
  • The Movies of 2015
    (”Me and Earl and the Dying Girl” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The end of 2016 is quickly approaching. With that in mind, patient I went back and created a list of all of the films that I reviewed this year and the different ratings I gave them. Of course, story this isn’t a complete list of all of the films I saw this year....
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • The 10 Best Movies of 2015
    (”Me and Earl and the Dying Girl” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    “As long as you can still grab a breathe, ask you fight.” That is the unmistakable and undeniable mantra of Hugh Glass, the tough frontiersman at the center of the new drama The Revenant. Played by Leonardo DiCaprio, Glass is a guide in the 1820s who has witnessed death and...
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    (Review Source)

Crosswalk1
Cross Walk



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Me and Earl and the Dying Girl Goes to the Head of the 2015 Film Class
    Movies DVD Release Date: October 6, 2015Theatrical Release Date: June 12, 2015Rating: PG-13 for sexual content, drug material, language and some thematic elementsGenre: DramaRun Time: 105 min.Director: Alfonso Gomez-RejonCast: Thomas Mann, Olivia Cooke, R.J. Cyler, Connie Britton, Nick Offerman, Molly Shannon, Jon Bernthal As one summer tent-pole film after another opens a bit softer than expected—then drops off more quickly than anticipated—entertainment reporters have focused on perceptions of disappointing overall 2015 box-office. Rare is the film that finds the sweet spot of critical accolades and box-office appeal. The year so far hasn’t lacked great films, but those that qualify for superlatives have been primarily limited-release fare. Acclaimed commercial hits like Paddington opened several months ago, or, in the case of the more recent Mad Max: Fury Road, have suffered by comparison to the higher grossing Pitch Perfect 2, which opened the same weekend as Mad Max. Me and Earl and the Dying Girl feels, rightly or wrongly, like one of a dying breed: a film without big stars or built-in brand recognition, but with potentially broad appeal. A teenage relationship movie with a heavy dose of comedy, it should attract both teens and adults, while cinema buffs will love the film’s homages to well-known earlier movies (the homages come in the form of home movies filmed by two of the story’s main characters). At the story’s core is a forced friendship that blossoms into something that amuses, delights and quietly devastates the audience. Comparisons to the 1980s teen comedies from writer/director John Hughes (The Breakfast Club, Pretty in Pink) or to the more recent The Fault in Our Stars aren’t amiss. But Me and Earl and the Dying Girl—another romance about, as in Stars, a girl fighting cancer—has enough quirky humor from its main characters and supporting cast (including sitcom and Saturday Night Live veterans) to make the film a standout among 2015 releases. It’s not only a candidate for the season’s first sleeper hit; it’s a strong contender as the year’s best film so far. When Greg (Thomas Mann) isn’t in school, he’s making spoofs of classic movies with friend Earl (R.J. Cyler). Their friendship, however, doesn’t seem to go much below their surface enjoyment of movies. Indeed, the aloof Greg has no deep relationships with any of his peers, so when his mother (Connie Britton) insists that he befriend a classmate, Rachel (Olivia Cooke), who’s just been diagnosed with leukemia, Greg is mortified.SEE ALSO: A Beach Boy Finds Love & Mercy in an Earthly Savior googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-1'); }); Unable to disguise his motives, Greg wins Rachel over with his honesty about the situation : He plans to spend just enough time with her to get his mom off his back. With that bumpy beginning to their relationship behind them, the two “friends” actually begin to enjoy one another’s company. The story easily could have become maudlin or, in an effort to steer clear of easy tears, too wacky. (Parks and Recreation star Nick Offerman and Saturday Night Live alumnus Molly Shannon generate laughs, some of which are uncomfortable, but don’t overwhelm the rest of the story.) But director Alfonso Gomez-Rejon pitches the material just right, helped by a voiceover from Greg that undercuts any assumptions that we in the audience might have about where the story is headed. (The script was written by Jesse Andrews, who authored the book on which the film is based.) Mann and Cooke give generous performances that will be benchmarks against which their future work is judged, and although Cyler’s part is less well defined, he’s given a key scene late in the film that drives the story to its moving conclusion. Refreshingly, Me and Earl and the Dying Girl pulls all this off without finding an excuse to get the two lead characters to sleep with each other. No, it’s not a squeaky-clean film (its PG-13 rating is due largely to some squirm-inducing affection toward Greg from Rachel’s mom, and a running joke about masturbation), but the characters are vivid and the emotional component of the film vital. Me and Earl and the Dying Girl won the audience and grand jury awards at the high-profile Sundance Film Festival, but less attention has been paid to the film’s Truly Moving Picture Award at the Heartland Film Festival. According to the Heartland website, that award goes to “a film with transformative power [that] is creative, beautiful, original, artistic and truthful.” Me and Earl and the Dying Girl is all of those things, and it belongs high up on any list of the best films of 2015 so far.SEE ALSO: Compassion for Characters Trumps Poor Decision Making in Laggies CAUTIONS (may contain spoilers): googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-2'); }); if (gptClientWidth >= 992 && gptClientWidth <= 1000000) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-3'); }); Language/Profanity: The Lord’s name taken in vain; the f word; “a-s”; crude terms for female anatomy and male anatomy; “s-it”; reference to a dog’s “smelly b---hole”; “dam-it”; joke names of film spoofs within the movie include “Pooping Tom” Drinking/Smoking/Drugs: Greg has hallucinations after eating some soup and believes he’s accidentally on drugs; “Ill Phil” at Greg’s school is a drug dealer; Greg and Earl’s film parodies include “Brew Velvet”; wine drinking; smoking Sex/Nudity: A website shows a girl dancing; discussion of tampons; Rachel’s mom comes on to Greg, calling him a “delicious, yummy, young boy”; a running joke about masturbation; a joke about the “last chance to be with a man” Violence/Crime: Friends fight Religion/Marriage/Morals: Rachel is told to remember that her cancer “is all part of God’s plan”; a character says he was made to feel blessed Publication date: June 11, 2015 SEE ALSO: Suicide Motif Makes for a Dark Skeleton Twins ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Plugged In1
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
    ComedyDrama We hope this review was both interesting and useful. Please share it with family and friends who would benefit from it as well.Movie ReviewHow does a self-conscious loner survive high school? For an affable-but-aloof senior named Greg, the answer is to become something of an everyman. That means carefully cultivating acquaintances in each of his Pittsburgh high school's "nations," as he dubs them: "Jock Nation," "Kingdom of Stoners," "People's Republic of Theater Dorks" and "Boring Jewish Senior Girls Subgroup 2A," among many others. In other words, Greg lurks quite intentionally at the periphery of everything, familiar to everyone, known by no one. Well, almost no one. There is Earl. Greg's known his friend from the mean streets across the tracks since they were in kindergarten. But Greg can't quite commit to that term, friend. Instead, Greg tells us in the opening moments of Me and Earl and the Dying Girl that he prefers to think of Earl as his "co-worker," a term he's appropriated to describe their longstanding partnership making animated, Super 8 parodies of classic movies (with titles like A Sockwork Orange and My Dinner With Andre the Giant). Greg's plot to drift anonymously through his senior year (and maybe even his whole life) gets tossed into a tizzy the day his mother tells him a fellow classmate—whom Greg knows but doesn't really know—named Rachel has been diagnosed with leukemia. Greg's mom says Rachel's mother, Denise, "feels you might be someone who could make her feel better." Greg's hardly convinced. But to placate his well-meaning-but-obviously-manipulative mom, he goes to visit Rachel at her house. It's hardly love at first sight. This is not that kind of movie. In fact, it's not even friendship at first sight. But as Greg keeps coming back to visit the increasingly sick classmate, a kindred connection is born, and an unlikely, yes, friendship begins to grow.Positive ElementsThough the central conflict here is ostensibly Rachel's encroaching cancer, the narrative really centers on how her tragic illness forces Greg to come to grips with his own selfishness. As time passes, Greg and Rachel develop a deep friendship, whether Greg will call it that or not. And, as he notes repeatedly, it's a platonic one, too. That’s a rare thing onscreen these days in coming of age tales. Yet Greg and Rachel do come of age as they're both forced to deal with the reality that her cancer is terminal. At one point, Greg is furious with her because she's ceased the medical treatment she feels is accomplishing little. "I'm the one who has to suffer through this," Rachel says. "So don't yell at me." Likewise, Earl confronts his friend's selfishness when Greg begins to act like a martyr of sorts because of Rachel's impending death. Slowly, Greg begins to realize how narcissistically he's responded to Rachel's terminal illness. As for Rachel, we watch her progress through the life-draining trauma of the disease. She says at one point, "The hardest part is my mom trying to deal with it all." Later, though, it gets much harder for her, too. After her hair falls out, Rachel tells Greg, "I thought it would be easier looking like this. And it's just not. … People are clearly repulsed. … I'm so ugly, Greg." Still, she doggedly tries to help Greg overcome his deep insecurities. She tells him, "You irrationally hate yourself," and tries to help him move toward self-acceptance. Despite his own self-centeredness, Greg still offers a huge chunk of his senior year of high school to try to cheer Rachel up. He spends time with her, cracks jokes (albeit frequently inappropriate ones) and generally does everything he knows how to do to make her smile. When it becomes clear that she is in fact going to die, the news devastates Greg, who really doesn't know what to do with the loss of someone he's come to care for so deeply. Greg and Earl share a deep bond as well. They make (ridiculous) movies together, as I said. And as Rachel's condition deteriorates dangerously with each passing week, the two boys eventually decide to offer the only kind of tribute to her they know how to create: a short movie celebrating the teen girl's brief but beautiful life. A teacher proves to be quite encouraging through this process. And he introduces the idea of celebrating the dignity and beauty of life by continuing to learn new things about someone even after they’re gone.Spiritual ContentA friend says, "I just want you to remember that your cancer is all part of God's plan." Someone describes life as "a living hell." A student with a penchant for black wears a pentagram on a necklace. Greg sarcastically quips, "High school is the mouth of a great demon."Sexual ContentWe see Greg rapidly closing multiple windows on his computer showing scantily clad women when his parents unexpectedly walk in on him. Greg's crush, a girl named Madison, wears formfitting tops. Earl and his older brother repeatedly talk about high school girls' "t-tties." Earl initially suggests that Greg should pursue a sexual relationship with Rachel, saying he might be "her last chance on earth to be with a man." Greg chivalrously rejects that notion. Denise flirts inappropriately with Greg, giving him a long hug at one point and calling him a "delicious young boy." And there’s a sideways gag about sexually assaulting a baby. Greg jokes twice about masturbating. We hear about STDs, “getting some,” making out and tampons. Some of the films Greg and Earl have spoofed are explicit, R-rated ones, such as Eyes Wide Shut, A Clockwork Orange and Midnight Cowboy.Recommended ResourceA Chicken's Guide to Talking Turkey With Your Kids About SexKevin LemanEven the bravest parents feel timid about discussing sex with their 8- to 14-year-olds! This resource offers reassuring, humorous, real-life anecdotes along with reliable information to help you with this challenging task.Buy NowViolent ContentThere are two brief fistfights involving a punch to the stomach and, later, some more serious pummeling. Elsewhere, Greg fakes having a seizure and dying. Claymation interludes show a guy tied up and about to be tortured; also a moose repeatedly stepping on a rodent.Crude or Profane LanguageOne fully spoken f-word and three censored ones. There are nearly 20 s-words. God's name is abused about 15 times (including at least four pairings with "d--n." Jesus name is misused four or five times. Variants of "a--" are used more than 20 times, "h---" a dozen times. Other vulgarities include "p---," "b--ch," etc. Anatomical crudities include about 10 uses of "d--k," three or four of "t-tties," one each of "boner" and "butthole."Drug and Alcohol ContentDenise almost always has a glass of wine in her hand, and she's usually tipsy from the stuff. She offers to share with Greg and Earl wine late in the film, saying she thinks they're old enough to have a drink. Earl accepts; Greg declines initially, then takes her up on the offer. One of Greg and Earl's movies is called Brew Velvet. Passing reference is made to someone's dad singing to German girls in bars. Greg and Earl inadvertently end up very stoned, and they blame their incapacitated condition on a teacher’s soup (which they had at lunch). Greg has hallucinations, seeing giant stuffed animals. They later realize their high came from eating some marijuana-laced cookies. Drug dealing is clearly being done at school, and stoners in the bathroom are shown smoking. Greg and Earl jokingly recall getting a contact high after being in an elevator with someone who was toking.Other Negative ElementsWe see a close-up of a dog's sexual anatomy.ConclusionIf '80s teen-feature maestro John Hughes would have ever teamed up with today’s eccentric moviemaker Wes Anderson, I suspect the outcome would be something like what we get in Me and Earl and the Dying Girl. This quirky, poignant, award-winning movie took Sundance by storm in 2015, much the same way Napoleon Dynamite did back in 2004. Indeed, while it's got more content to grapple with than Napoleon does, it's got a similar kind of core sweetness to it. As I mentioned, unlike the vast majority of teen-themed movies, this one isn't a romance. It's about friendship. It's about the struggle to grow up. It's about dealing with the self-absorption that is so interwoven into the youthful experience. And it's about sifting through the awful reality of premature death. All of that makes for a compelling story—told in a way that we haven't seen a dozen times already as we’re invited into an intimate (but not sexual) friendship demonstrating the beauty and dignity of life. In a roundtable discussion that Plugged In participated in, star Thomas Mann (Greg), noted that the film focuses on "making the most of your relationships." I think he's right. This is the kind of story that could open up meaningful conversations with teens about significant themes such as friendship and death, finding meaning and purpose in life and setting aside our tendency at times to focus on ourselves instead of focusing on others who are struggling much more deeply than we are. Completely incompatible with such a positive teachable moment, Me and Earl and the Dying Girl also drags out of its pockets (like so many greasy and gross tater tots) handfuls of bad ideas, dirty jokes and harsh profanity. Just the kind of unnecessary content that might lead Napoleon Dynamite to let out an exasperated "Gosh!"Pro-social ContentObjectionable ContentSummary AdvisoryPlot SummaryChristian BeliefsOther Belief SystemsAuthority RolesProfanity/ViolenceKissing/Sex/HomosexualityDiscussion TopicsAdditional Comments/NotesEpisode Reviews]]>
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    (Review Source)

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