John Carter

Not rated yet!
Director
Andrew Stanton
Runtime
2 h 12 min
Release Date
7 March 2012
Genres
Action, Adventure, Science Fiction
Overview
John Carter is a war-weary, former military captain who's inexplicably transported to the mysterious and exotic planet of Barsoom (Mars) and reluctantly becomes embroiled in an epic conflict. It's a world on the brink of collapse, and Carter rediscovers his humanity when he realizes the survival of Barsoom and its people rests in his hands.
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PJ Media Staff9
PJ Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • First Look: John Carter (of Mars) Trailer
    Lifestyle The much anticipated trailer for the Disney treatment of the classic Edgar Rice Burroughs sci-fi adventure series John Carter of Mars was released yesterday. var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'John Carter Trailer 2012 -- Official Movie Trailer | HD', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); How cool is that? Love those Barsoomian ships. But after drooling over Frank Franzetta's voluptuous renderings of "the incomparable" Dejah Thoris on book covers for years, the shock of seeing her with a top on will take some getting used to.Fans of the last major series by Burroughs not butchered by Hollywood are holding their breath that for once, Tinsel Town will get it right and capture the vision of one of the most imaginative writers of the 20th century.So far, there are signs that cause both trepidation and hope. Most worrisome is dropping "of Mars" from the original title. Now it is simply John Carter set for release on March 9, 2012. Disney - marketing geniuses? Maybe they know something the rest of us don't.They are also being coy about the look of some of the fantastical Martian beasts - especially the humanoid Tharks. John Carter's experiences with the 15 foot tall green skinned, 4 armed, be-tusked "hordes" is a central part of the story. Also wondering about Carter's Calot (dog) Woola who stands as tall as a Shetland pony with 10 legs and the head of a frog.What about Carter's superior strength and agility, bulging muscles and giant "thews?" Carter could leap 30 feat at a time in the weaker Martian gravity, which gave him an enormous advantage over any adversary. It's the reason he's dominant on the planet so you wonder if  they can remain true to that part of Carter's personae.And they better not screw up the thoats. (great Wiki on Barsoom here).On the good side, Andrew Stanton (Wall-E and Finding Nemo) is helming the project which is already into post-production. Stanton, who also penned the script, swears that he has made a "true Martian movie." Famous last words. And judging from the trailer, there doesn't appear to be anything cheesy about the backdrops -- a fault that ruined The Martian Chronicles.The stars are a mixed lot. I'm dubious of Willem Dafoe playing Carter's best friend, the Thark Tars Tarkas. But Lynn Collins (X-Men Origins: Wolverine) as Dejah Thoris seems fine. Taylor Kitsch (Friday Night Lights) as John Carter is going to be hit or miss. I think he's too young (Carter was a Civil War hero) but he looks great in the trailer - suitably heroic. Hard to think of who might have played the role today. Contemporary action heroes just wouldn't fill the bill. How about Robert Taylor or Victor Mature? Errol Flynn might have been OK too.I apologize if my cynicism is showing through but so many films have disappointed upon being transferred from literature to celluloid that I am fully expecting disaster. I think the best those of us who are fans of the series can hope for is that they stick to the story and not overload the film with a lot of syrupy exposition and non-essential romance.IMDB page here.   class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2011/7/15/first-look-john-carter-of-mars-trailer/ ]]>
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  • John Carter and The Master of Adventure
    Lifestyle After weathering mixed reviews and relatively tepid domestic earnings ($72 million) earlier this year, the science fiction adventure epic John Carter was written off as a box office calamity of Waterworld-sized proportions.John Carter’s box office “failure” has been blamed mostly on ineffective marketing, notably a movie trailer which neglected to establish a connection with Burroughs or make viewers aware of the film’s historic background and seminal influence – a problem that might have been avoided if Disney had run with this inspired fan trailer instead.But the movie’s unabashed heroic romanticism began resonating with review-proof fans worldwide (where it has earned $200+ million) and reviving the flick’s financial pulse. Now JC is set to release on DVD this week, and will likely do brisk business. Perhaps it will also introduce more fans to John Carter’s creator, one of the most prolific, imaginative novelists of the 20th century – or any century, for that matter: Edgar Rice Burroughs.This year marks the 100th anniversary of the publication of Burroughs’ first novel, A Princess of Mars, the book upon which John Carter is largely based. Burroughs, or ERB, is more familiar to many as the creator of Tarzan of the Apes, one of the most recognizable and enduring figures in pop culture history. Born in 1875 in the wake of Jules Verne and H.G. Wells, ERB has been called by many the father of American science fiction. His 60+ novels, ripping tales of high adventure set everywhere from the earth’s core to the African veldt to the jungles of Venus, served as inspiration for countless writers and scientists from Arthur C. Clarke and Ray Bradbury to Carl Sagan and Jane Goodall.ERB’s work – novels like The Land that Time Forgot, The Moon Maid, Pirates of Venus, At the Earth’s Core, Beyond Thirty, and The Warlord of Mars – gave life to the pulp fiction genre; my boyhood friend and fellow fan Stephan Allsup points out, for example, that without Tarzan and John Carter, there probably would have been no Conan the Barbarian or Doc Savage. Tarzan was also the pioneer of the comic book superhero; his comic strip was introduced in 1929, tying with Buck Rogers as the first “serious” adventure strip (prior to that, comics were largely limited to funnies like the Katzenjammer Kids). It served as inspiration for The Phantom and later, Superman and Batman. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2012/6/4/john-carter-and-the-master-of-adventure/ previous Page 1 of 2 next   ]]>
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  • John Carter Headed For $200 Million Loss
    Lifestyle For those of us who are fans -- and always will be fans -- of the marvelous Edgar Rice Burroughs series John Carter of Mars, the news that the film version will lose somewhere in the neighborhood of $200 million is depressing. The BBC critic Mark Kermode summed up the movie's major problem:The storytelling is incomprehensible, the characterization is ludicrous, the story is two and a quarter hours long and it’s a boring, boring, boring two and a quarter hours long. The film cost a staggering $250 million to make and another $100 million to promote.  A Disney spokesman confirmed to the Daily Mail the bad news, saying, "In light of the theatrical performance of John Carter, we expect the film to generate an operating loss of approximately $200 million."What went wrong? One of the most beloved sci-fi series of all time is set to become the biggest financial flop in Hollywood history.Some critics point to the director and producers as being in over their heads. That's one of those criticisms that is impossible to prove, but sounds like the critic knows something about making movies. In fact, the director, Andrew Stanton, was no stranger to blockbuster projects, and treated the source material with respect -- even reverence.But I agree with this notion from Rick Liebling,the Creative Culturalist at Y&R New York:Indiana Jones on Mars? Sequels and theme park attractions? That’s why movies like this (or just about any other "blockbuster") suck. They are viewed as franchise vehicles or cross-promotional, money-spinning opportunities. I’m not opposed to those things by the way, but when they are the raison d’etre, well all you’re going to get is a steaming turd.Beyond the Hollywoodisms and other inside-industry explanations, there is the cultural chasm between the world in which John Carter was originally created by Burroughs and the less literate, less imaginative, more realistic world into which the film was released.Chris Queen did an excellent job of fleshing out the history and background of the John Carter novels for PJ Media prior to the film's release. In 1911 when the first story appeared in in the pulp magazine The All Story, the Civil War had been over less than 50 years. Almost everyone knew a veteran from that war, or saw them during parades and other patriotic events. The war was still alive for kids and young adults at that time, making the character John Carter live in ways that we can't even imagine.While Burroughs' time was more literate, it was the imagination that forged a connection to the stories and characters and created such a powerful hold on our affections. In an age before film, before TV, before radio, there was only the reader, the written word, and however we imagined the world being created by the author. Burroughs' prose could be turgid at times -- to our ears anyway --  but the compelling way in which he described his world of Barsoom far surpassed any attempts we might make today to translate the author's imagined adventures to the screen. There are simply no cultural touchstones that connect the world of Burroughs with our world today. A young boy living in pre-World War I America imagined Barsoom far differently that I did in the 1960s. And it is likely that most kids today hadn't even read the books, waiting instead for the video game. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2012/3/21/john-carter-headed-for-200-million-loss/ previous Page 1 of 2 next   ]]>
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  • That Was Quick: John Carter Already Out on Blu Ray
    Lifestyle Special Features• Blu-ray 3D (TM) Feature Film• Blu-ray Feature Film + Bonus• DVD Feature Film+ Bonus• Digital Copy of Feature Film• Disney Second Screen• 360 Degrees of John Carter• Deleted Scene with Option Commentary by Director Andrew Stanton• Barsoom Bloopers• 100 Years in the Making• Audio Commentary with Film MakersSee also at PJ Lifestyle: From Mark Tapson, "John Carter and The Master of Adventure" class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2012/6/5/that-was-quick-john-carter-already-out-on-blu-ray/ ]]>
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  • Disney's Rich Ross: The Rise And Fall Of An Entertainment Mogul
    Lifestyle After two and a half years at the helm of of Walt Disney Studios, Chairman Rich Ross, 50, stepped down on Friday. Ross' departure comes on the heels of the high-profile failure of the sci-fi/fantasy epic John Carter. The $250 million film, which Disney hoped would be the year's first blockbuster, only earned $269 million worldwide. After distribution and marketing expenses, John Carter's dismal take equals a loss of $80-120 million for Disney.Ross issued a statement attributing his departure to the idea that he wasn't the right man for the job:"The best people need to be in the right jobs, in roles they are passionate about, doing work that leverages the full range of their abilities," he said. "I no longer believe the chairman role is the right professional fit for me."Disney CEO Robert Iger also released a statement praising Ross and wishing him well:"Rich Ross's creative instincts, business acumen and personal integrity have driven results in key businesses for Disney," Iger said. "I appreciate his countless contributions throughout his entire career at Disney, and expect he will have tremendous success in whatever he chooses to do next."After stints at Nickelodeon and FX, Rich Ross came to Disney in 1996, where he served as vice president of programming and production, and he rose to president of Disney Channels Worldwide in 2004. As head of Disney Channels Worldwide, Ross was responsible for such brands as Playhouse Disney, Disney XD, Jetix, and Radio Disney.Ross helped Disney Channel become the kids-and-tweens juggernaut that it is today. He launched the Disney Channel Original Movie franchise, which spawned enormous hits like the High School Musical and Camp Rock series. Radio Disney became a stepping stone for pop music success. Under Ross' leadership, Disney Channel produced phenomenally successful shows like Hannah Montana, The Suite Life of Zack & Cody, Phineas & Ferb, and Wizards of Waverly Place. Playhouse Disney (now Disney Junior) increased its dominance under Ross as well. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2012/4/21/disneys-rich-ross-the-rise-and-fall-of-an-entertainment-mogul/ previous Page 1 of 3 next   ]]>
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  • The 10 Most Underrated Live-Action Disney Films
    Lifestyle Last week I shared my picks for the ten most overrated films in Disney's live-action canon. This week, we're going to take a look at the flip side and explore the most underrated live-action Disney movies.Believe it or not, some Disney productions just don't get the respect that they deserve. That fact could be for a number of reasons: the movie didn't make enough of a dent at the box office, the picture was overshadowed by another film, or the release just hasn't had time for fans to consider it a classic. Whatever the reason, these ten films have gone underrated for too long. Enjoy! var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Pete's Dragon (1977) Disney Home Video Australia Trailer', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); 10. Pete's Dragon (1977)The first movie I remember seeing in the theater was Pete’s Dragon.  (I had to have seen Star Wars earlier in the year, because I remember the excitement of a Star Wars watch I received for Christmas, but I just don’t remember it.) Disney first optioned the story of an orphan boy and the dragon he befriends back in the ‘50s, but sat on the property for two decades.The film contains the hallmarks of a classic – great songs, an Oscar-nominated score, plenty of talent in the cast. Unfortunately, it came near the tail end of the Ron Miller area, which was a low point in quality for the studio. I can’t help but believe that had it debuted at another time in company history, people might remember it more fondly today. Still, it’s worth checking out. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2014/8/9/the-10-most-underrated-live-action-disney-films/ previous Page 1 of 10 next   ]]>
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  • The 5 Biggest Box Office Flops Coming This Summer
    (”John Carter” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle Each spring, the showbiz hype machine talks up the excitement level of the summer blockbuster slate. In fact, despite a big May, Summer 2013 is looking like one of the dreariest and most useless summers ever, loaded with sequels to movies that weren’t worth seeing in the first place, lame vanity projects, overdone epics, and dull retreads.Forget the summer’s biggest hits. What will the biggest flops of the season be? Here’s an educated guess based on advance buzz. var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'After Earth Official Trailer #1 (2013) - Will Smith Movie HD', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); 1. After Earth (May 31)This is a movie that goes wrong early. Really early. In the credits. “Story by Will Smith”? Huh?Starring the top-billed Smith son Jaden Smith, who is no longer the adorable little kid he was in Pursuit of Happyness and The Karate Kid but is now a sullen teen? Directed by notorious hack M. Night Shyamalan, he of The Happening and The Lady in the Water and The Last Airbender, the guy who hasn’t made a movie that wasn’t laughed out of theaters in a decade?Despite all of these obvious problems, plus the additional worry that the similar Tom Cruise movie Oblivion came out in April and fulfilled its title’s destiny almost instantly, After Earth is somehow managing to underperform expectations, causing early viewers to wonder why the former biggest star in the world, the elder Smith, spends most of the second half of the movie injured and stuck in a chair giving his son long-distance pep talks after the two crash-land on Earth to fight monsters a thousand years in the future. And why do both of them talk like they’re from New Zealand? This one is headed for the Bad Idea Hall of Fame, and the Stale Prince’s stock is plummeting after Men in Black III and Seven Pounds. var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'The Pursuit of Happyness Trailer', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2013/5/31/the-5-biggest-box-office-flops-coming-this-summer/ previous Page 1 of 5 next   ]]>
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John Hanlon3
John Hanlon Reviews



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • John Carter
    John Carter begins in New York City in 1881. The title character—a war veteran– is a loner in the age of the Civil War. Although he is a skilled soldier, approved he no longer wishes to fight. “We’re nothing but a war species and I want no...
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  • 5 Reasons Why John Carter Disappoints
    John Carter could have been a good movie. In fact, order I included it in a list of 10 films that we here at Screen Rant were looking forward to this month. The trailer made the imagery look exciting and I was eagerly anticipating one of the first leading movie roles that...
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Crosswalk1
Cross Walk



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • John Carter Is as Plain as the Name
    Movies DVD Release Date: June 5, 2012Theatrical Release Date: March 9, 2012Rating: PG-13 (for intense sequences of violence and action)Genre: Action, Sci-Fi, FantasyRun Time: 132 min.Director: Andrew StantonActors: Taylor Kitsch, Lynn Collins, Dominic West, Ciarán Hinds, Willem Dafoe, Mark Strong, Samantha Morton, James Purefoy, Bryan Cranston Christians spend a lot of time condemning Hollywood for undermining their faith, so it’s refreshing to find Christians working in Hollywood. It’s particularly encouraging when those Christian artists turn out to be widely admired in their field. Andrew Stanton is one such filmmaker, a Christian who has spoken about his faith while creating and publicizing two of the best films of the 2000s: Finding Nemo and Wall-E, both by Pixar. Now Stanton has been given a gigantic budget—reportedly $250 million—to write (with Mark Andrews and Michael Chabon) and direct an adaptation of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ 1917 short story “A Princess of Mars.” The resulting movie, John Carter, frustrates. The money is there on the screen, with often impressive, if derivative, special effects. The acting is satisfactory, considering that the human actors spend much of their time interacting with CGI creatures. But the story never quite comes together, leaving a dissatisfying sense of what might have been. John Carter isn’t terrible, it’s just OK. But it could have been much more. The movie’s opening stretch, which introduces Civil War veteran John Carter (Taylor Kitsch, X-Men Origins: Wolverines) from Virginia, is its best. Stanton has done a nice job of giving the film an authentic Old West period feeling, but just as we’re settling into the film’s environment, Carter is transported to Mars, known by its inhabitants as Barsoom. There he’s drawn into another civil war between warring regions Helium and Zodanga. Helium’s leader, Tardos Mars (Ciarán Hinds, The Woman in Black), thinks he can avoid war with Zodanga leader Sab Than (Dominic West, Arthur Christmas) by giving Than the hand of his daughter, Princess Dejah Thoris (Lynn Collins, X-Men Origins: Wolverine), in marriage. Not surprisingly, Dejah isn’t thrilled with that plan, or with the revealing bridal gown she’s forced to wear through much of the film (“I find it a bit vulgar,” she says). John Carter to the rescue! There aren’t many surprises in this story of a man who fights for a woman’s honor and on behalf of a group of overmatched warriors, and who gradually comes to identify with those he’s defending. John Carter is more about how the story is presented—the visual delights of the landscape of Mars and its inhabitants. It’s here that the movie excels, with flying war planes and creatures that put viewers into another world.SEE ALSO: Imaginative Wall·E Connects Dots Between Man and Machine googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-1'); }); Too bad that the human characters jar us from that place anytime they open their mouths. Kitsch acquits himself well, as do West and Hinds, but Collins’ personality is never more memorable than the bridal gown with which she’s saddled. The appearance of excellent character actor Mark Strong as Matai Shang is bothersome; didn’t we see Strong in a similar role in last summer’s Green Lantern? But it’s the story’s language, not its cast or characters, that may be a stumbling block for some. Some of Burroughs’ character names might have thrilled audiences in the early twentieth century, but they make for a good test case as to whether today’s viewers are likely to enjoy John Carter. For instance, when you hear the name “Tars Tarkas, leader of the Tharks,” do you nod soberly and consider the hierarchy of an alien species, or do you snort derisively? If the latter, stay away from John Carter, which has a Zodenga, a Tardos, a Helium and other names and terms that might be a distraction. Even a literary light of the caliber of Michael Chabon, who is credited as one of the screenwriters, can only do so much with Burroughs’ original story. More troublesome is the central romance between Carter and Princess Dejah, which never rises above cartoonish posturing. Flashbacks to the marriage Carter has left behind on Earth are more affecting, albeit brief. In fact, those moments showing life on Earth are a reminder that the story worked best on that terra firma—a problem for a film that spends two hours of its two-hour-and-15-minute running time on Mars. Burroughs’ story has served as a template for many science-fiction stories and films that followed it, so it never feels less than familiar. That’s not grounds for criticizing the film—familiar stories told well have their pleasures. The problem with John Carter is that so little of the film stands out or sticks in one’s memory. Stanton has said that he hopes to make a trilogy of films about Carter, but based on this first entry, one chapter will probably be enough. John Carter doesn’t send us out of the theater angry, but neither does it leave us wanting more.CAUTIONS:SEE ALSO: The Sharpest Thing About Wolverine Are the Claws googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-2'); }); if (gptClientWidth >= 992 && gptClientWidth <= 1000000) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-3'); }); Language/Profanity: “Go-dam-”; “where the hell”; “hell” again appears in a subtitle; “good God”; “dam- you.” Alcohol/Smoking/Drugs: None. Sex/Nudity: Kissing; revealing bridal outfit for Dejah; a man urinates, and we see the stream of urine; bare-chested men. Violence/Crime: We hear of, but don’t see, a man who has dropped dead; fist fights; guns aimed and fired; man struck with the butt of a gun; head-butts; Indians and soldiers have a shootout; bullet wound to the backside; sword fight; John Carter is beaten; an alien is branded with a hot iron; John Carter fights giant white apes and, in one gory sequence, emerges from one of the beasts covered in blue blood. Religion/Morals: Goddess worship; “goddess help me”; “it is the will of the goddess”; “thank you, goddess”; Dejah’s forced marriage to Sab is key to the story. Questions? Comments? Contact the writer at [email protected]/* ...
    (Review Source)

Plugged In1
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • John Carter
    DramaAction/AdventureSci-Fi/FantasyRomanceWar We hope this review was both interesting and useful. Please share it with family and friends who would benefit from it as well.Movie ReviewBefore Jake Sully, before Han Solo, before virtually every science fiction hero you can brainstorm in two minutes or less, there was John Carter. Author Edgar Rice Burroughs, best known as the creator of Tarzan, brought him to life in a serialized story a full century ago in April 1912. In 1917, the tale would be published as the novel A Princess of Mars. As the curtain opens, it's 1881, and wealthy Civil War veteran John Carter has passed away. His nephew, a fictionalized version of the story's writer, has been summoned for a reading of the will. Among the treasures he's bequeathed is Carter's journal, which tells a story beyond his wildest imagination. In 1868, the journal relates, Carter discovered a cave of gold—and cryptic writings—in the Arizona desert. While being pursued by hostile Apache Indians and government forces, the former Confederate surprises and shoots a strangely dressed bald man lurking in the cave. Seizing a glowing amulet from around the man's neck, Carter is mysteriously teleported to another desert where he can, for some reason, leap enormous distances and has seemingly superhuman strength. The truth eventually dawns on him: "I'm on Mars!" Mars at that moment is embroiled in a planet-wide civil war. The human-looking citizens of the city-state of Helium have been resisting the cunning attempts of the kingdom of Zodanga (also humanoids) to obliterate them in a millennium-long war. But the stalemate has recently been broken by a new weapon of unfathomable power wielded by Zodanga's scheming king, Sab Than. As Sab Than obliterates Helium's legions, the city-state's king yields to Sab Than's terms of surrender: giving the hand of his daughter, Princess Dejah Thoris, in marriage to him. The princess, however, will have none of that—and flees. Carter, meanwhile, has been half captured, half adopted by a fierce tribe of 15-foot-tall warrior aliens with tusks on their heads and four arms on their bodies. They're known as Tharks, and Carter's quickly befriended by a leader named Tars Tarkas, who sees something in the human his comrades don't. Right about then, Dejah Thoris' fleeing ship floats overhead, with Sab Than in hot pursuit, determined to claim his would-be bride. But John Carter will have none of that. [Note: Spoilers are contained in the following sections.]Positive ElementsJohn Carter is a decorated Civil War veteran from the South. But the killing of his beloved wife and child (whose bodies he finds in a flashback scene) has sapped his appetite for self-sacrifice. When we first meet him, Carter is medicating his soul with the pursuit of riches ... and booze. It's his rendezvous with Tars Tarkas and Dejah Thoris on Mars—which the planets' denizens know as Barsoom—that will slowly reawaken the hero within. The spark of attraction between the princess and the earthling is immediately evident. Carter resists it, not wanting to risk his heart again. And for much of the film, he's more interested in finding a way back home than he is rescuing Dejah. But much like the aforementioned Han Solo's interaction with Princess Leia in Star Wars, Carter's calloused heart is softened by a beguiling princess who would bravely do anything to save her people. Slowly, Dejah's courage and noble character revive Carter's own heroic instincts, after which he fights with all his considerable might to rescue her and save her people. Along the way, Carter and Tars Tarkas become brothers in arms (and remember, there are six arms between them!). Tars Tarkas, as well as his kind daughter, Sola, repeatedly put themselves at risk to protect or save Carter, despite strong disapproval at times from their fellow Tharks. Carter repays the favor by ultimately winning the fearsome alien race's allegiance, becoming their leader and commanding an army of Tharks in the film's climactic battle.Spiritual ContentThe idea of eternity with God is evoked when it looks as if Carter is dead on Earth. A flashback shows him burying his wife and child and placing makeshift crosses on their graves. A Hindu statue shows up in his treasure room. On Mars, all races seem to participate in a monotheistic religion. Specifically, both the human-like Red Martians and the Tharks worship a goddess named Issus. They pray to her personally (Dejah entreats, "Goddess, help me! I'm helpless!"), they worship in sacred temples and earnest adherents make spiritual pilgrimages. Issus' name is used as a mindless interjection, too, much as Jesus' is on our world. Seeking a way back to Earth, Carter and Dejah enter a Thark temple to Issus, an action that is considered blasphemous. While there, they discover an inscription reading, "Let those who seek the solace of eternity journey on the river and find everlasting peace in the bosom of Issus." That leads them up the sacred river in search of the Gates of Is, a portal Dejah believes will help Carter return home. Once there, however, she discerns that its wonders are not of a spiritual origin: "This is not the work of gods," she exclaims. "These are machines." That leads us to the Therns. The goddess is served, it is believed, by mysterious agents known as Therns, who act as her messengers. The malevolent Matai Shang is the chief Thern; he's grants Sab Than his awesome weapon—supposedly an expression of the goddess's will. But the Therns, we learn, are not messengers of Issus at all. These bald men, sometimes known as White Martians, are beings of advanced technology who use it to manipulate events—across the universe. Matai Shang confesses to Carter (his prisoner at one point) that he and his race move from planet to planet, working behind the scenes to shape each world's ultimate destiny. "History will follow the course we have set," he says. "We don't cause the destruction of a world, we manage it. Populations rise. Societies divide. Chaos spreads." Eventually, he says, a population devours itself and "slowly fades." It's a process he and his people somehow "feed" off of. In all of this, then, the film presents a surprisingly intricate imagined Martian mythology. There's a unified monotheistic religion that, while definitely not Christianity, exhibits parallel ideas, including a personal deity who is said to hear the prayers of supplicants and supposedly has a will for the way events play out. But that religious tradition is set against the backdrop of a deeper magic—technologically driven—that has been used to either perpetuate or exploit it. And note that several scenes show Thern agents on Earth as well.Sexual ContentDejah Thoris' outfits expose cleavage, midriff and thigh—with her wedding gown in particular revealing quite a lot of each. For his part, Carter is almost always shirtless on Mars. Several action scenes find her in his arms. They kiss. And the night after their wedding, we see her sit up in bed with a sheet wrapped around her chest. (Carter is not in bed with her.) There's vieled talk of consumation.Recommended ResourceA Chicken's Guide to Talking Turkey With Your Kids About SexKevin LemanEven the bravest parents feel timid about discussing sex with their 8- to 14-year-olds! This resource offers reassuring, humorous, real-life anecdotes along with reliable information to help you with this challenging task.Buy NowViolent ContentSab Than's super-weapon makes him unstoppable on the battlefield. It fires a lightning-like ray vaporizing all comers. In almost video game fashion, he sweeps the beam across the decks of floating warships in the opening battle, incinerating virtually everyone onboard. And it's a weapon he uses repeatedly throughout the film. Aerial warfare—when Sab Than's not using his rampaging ray gun—is akin to two 17th-century galleons trading cannon shots at close range. And speaking of close range, when the soldiers of Helium and Zodanga clash, those battles look a whole lot like something out of Gladiator (though not as graphically rendered) as they attack with swords while wearing Roman-evoking armor and leather accoutrements. As for the Tharks, they are vicious hand-to-hand opponents, and they also employ long rifles in battle. Quite a few characters are shot, both on Mars and in a battle between American soldiers and Apache Indians back on Earth. Carter beheads a Thark adversary in a duel, and we see the head hit the ground. He, Tars Tarkas and Sola fight two enormous, fanged apes in a gladiator-like arena. Carter eventually kills both apes, with the second falling on top of him. Several seconds later he emerges from the creature's carcass, having cut his way through. He's covered with its bright blue blood. In a brig on Earth, Carter grabs a guard's head through the bars, ramming it into the metal and knocking him out so he can escape. As a punishment, a Thark is branded on her back with a glowing iron. Thark hatchlings (the race is reptile-like) not strong enough to keep are mercilessly massacred by the grown-ups, who, incidentally, fight over the right to "own" and raise the survivors. (We see images at a distance of Tharks firing rifles into a hatchery.)Crude or Profane LanguageOne use of "g‑‑d‑‑n" and two milder misuses of God's name. "H‑‑‑" is uttered a half-dozen times, "d‑‑n" twice.Drug and Alcohol ContentTwo American soldiers at a fort in Arizona are shown drinking.Other Negative ElementsCarter urinates (onscreen, seen from the rear) through the bars of the brig. Dejah deceives Carter at one point, and he punishes her by throwing her out of her beast's saddle.ConclusionBig-budget action flicks are a dime a dozen these days, never mind that they cost a whole lot more than that to make. What sets John Carter apart is that this story—which reportedly cost Disney $250 million—is really the ancestor of them all. Both George Lucas and James Cameron credit Edgar Rice Burroughs as an inspiration. And it's clear that director Andrew Stanton, best-known for helming Pixar's WALL-E and Finding Nemo, has got Lucas and Cameron in his sights. The circular result is an epic swashbuckler that is both homage and original. It starts slowly—there's a lot of backstory to be developed before the film starts hitting on all cylinders—but once things get rolling, John Carter's heroic heart matches its lofty aspirations. And in some ways it's more emotionally satisfying than either Avatar or the new Star Wars prequels. There's gobs of CGI wizardry, of course, but at least here it serves the story well—the story of a once-and-future hero whose nobility is reinvigorated by a beautiful princess and the just cause she's fighting for. As for that princess, again just like Leia (in Return of the Jedi), there's enough of her body visible to warrant a notation. Not that Stanton depicts her as being "destitute of clothes" like the books do. Violence? Intense and nearly constant. Mostly bloodless. It's very similar to what we see in The Lord of the Rings trilogy. And then there's the spiritual stuff. Avatar posited an aggressive pantheism. John Carter paints a vivid picture of monotheism—that's somewhat at the mercy of … technology. And plot points are often driven by the Martians' devotion to Issus. So is Issus a stand-in for Jesus? Is John Carter, who bears His initials and becomes an otherworldly savior? Or do the Therns fill that role here? The movie hints at those kinds of questions for Christians, but it doesn't answer them. And if you walk even a few steps down any of those paths, the analogue breaks up into digital static pretty quickly. What doesn't distort or disintegrate is John Carter's journey toward rediscovering the qualities that made him a hero in the first place. He has to go all the way to another planet to do it, but do it he does.Pro-social ContentObjectionable ContentSummary AdvisoryPlot SummaryChristian BeliefsOther Belief SystemsAuthority RolesProfanity/ViolenceKissing/Sex/HomosexualityDiscussion TopicsAdditional Comments/NotesEpisode Reviews]]>
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Michael Medved1



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • John Carter
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The Weekly Standard Staff2
The Weekly Standard



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Justice League Is Crashing and Burning. Will Anyone Survive?
    (”John Carter” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    JONATHAN V. LAST

    One of the rituals of Thanksgiving weekend is heading out to see a movie. And so, with that in mind, let me do you a mitzvah: Do not see Justice League.

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    (Review Source)
  • Justice League Is Crashing and Burning. Will Anyone Survive?
    (”John Carter” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Wonder Woman will probably make it out okay. But everyone else associated with this movie is toast.
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    (Review Source)

Kyle Smith2
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Vin Diesel throwback 'Riddick' chugs along
    (”John Carter” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    movie reviewsriddickvin diesel Memo to movie bad guys: Never vow to put Vin Diesel’s head in a box. He may take umbrage. And consider the practicalities: How do you saw off the cranium of a man with no neck? Even if you could, you’d need a forklift to move it around. In “Riddick,” that Diesel head (like a flexed triceps) and that Diesel voice (the exhaust pipe of a Harley) prove well-matched to writer-director David Twohy’s unashamed B-movie vision. This is the rare sci-fi actioner that doesn’t rush to bore you with its views on global warming, class divisions or immigration; at no point does Jodie Foster wander in trying to sound European. In the third entry in the series that began in 2000 with the surprise low-budget hit “Pitch Black” and continued with the expensive 2004 flop “The Chronicles of Riddick,” Diesel’s cunning survivor Richard Riddick is (again) the wronged ex-soldier stranded alone on a merciless planet as bounty hunters prowl the galaxy for him. He’s wanted dead or alive, but preferably dead. Wandering alone, Riddick inoculates himself against the venom of the planet’s vicious pincer-mouthed serpents and domesticates a jackal-like beast that becomes a stalwart guardian. Twohy has an enticing patience that allows you to get accustomed to Riddick’s world and the methodical ways he copes with it. These quiet, slow-developing scenes stand in delightful contrast to, say, the frantic cutting and hunger for explosions of the tiresome “Iron Man 3.” That “Riddick” was made on more of a Tinfoil Man budget works very much to its advantage. It’s like an early-’70s Charlton Heston sci-fi movie that has to function as a story because it can’t afford bombast. And when the gangs of bounty hunters show up — one led by a swaggering Spanish jerk named Santana (a highly amusing Jordi Molla), the other by Johns (Matt Nable), the militarily efficient father of Riddick’s enemy from the first movie — the testosterone sprays off the screen. You may have to punch someone on your way out of the theater just to relieve the manly ache of pent-up aggression. The competing teams of bounty hunters squabble among themselves, with Santana threatens rape in the general direction of the lesbian cutie Dahl (Katee Sackhoff), who almost regretfully kicks his ass. Riddick (who can see in the dark) could be anywhere, they tell one another, unaware he’s perched right on top of their ship. In a cleverly executed piece of misdirection, Twohy wrings tension out of a potential explosion that segues beautifully into the hunters’ realization that Riddick has stolen the initiative. The somewhat hokey Edgar Rice Burroughs atmosphere (with production design touches from “Alien” and “Road Warrior”) is made cool with Riddick’s cynical, sometimes funny Raymond Chandler narration (a big improvement over those stuffy and declarative Heston lines). The movie actually winds up being engagingly chatty, with insults flying in the interludes between the cheaply done effects sequences. That CGI can be laughably bad — a shot of the men on flying choppers looks so pasted-together it could have been on an old kiddie show like “Land of the Lost.” But cheap effects are forgivable if you’re engaged in the story, and for me the two hours went by quickly. I do wish the last 20 minutes hadn’t been mired in murk (another way to cheat when the money isn’t there) but what’s more important is the story errors — the pincer monsters suddenly become way too easy to kill, and Riddick is a passive figure at a climactic moment, his survival dependent on others. Still, the movie jogs along nicely without ever getting a case of the stupids; far from being a bloated “John Carter,” it’s just a pared-down yarn of survival: “Die Hard” on a planet. Share this:FacebookTwitterGoogleFacebook MessengerWhatsAppEmailCopy ]]>
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