It Comes at Night

Not rated yet!
Director
Trey Edward Shults
Runtime
1 h 31 min
Release Date
9 June 2017
Genres
Horror, Mystery, Thriller
Overview
Secure within a desolate home as an unnatural threat terrorizes the world, a man has established a tenuous domestic order with his wife and son, but this will soon be put to test when a desperate young family arrives seeking refuge.
Staff ReviewsAround the Web ReviewsAudience Reviews

Check back soon when the reviews are out!

Or why not join our mailing list to stay up to date?

 

SIGN UP!

Box office recaps sent twice a month (maximum). 

    ( ̄^ ̄)ゞ 
(☞゚ヮ゚)☞  No spam! ☜(゚ヮ゚☜)




 ✍🏻  > 🗡️   Want to join our team? Email us!  
Plugged In
Focus on the Family@pluggedin

(Reviewer Site/Bio)
  • It Comes At Night
    HorrorMystery/Suspense We hope this review was both interesting and useful. Please share it with family and friends who would benefit from it as well.Movie ReviewTravis watched his father kill his grandfather, roll the body into a shallow grave and light it on fire. It was a horrible thing. The virus, or whatever this plague is that's been killing people, had turned the old man's body into a horror show. Finally, it was too much: Grandpa was just too far gone. So Travis, his dad (Paul) and his mom (Sarah) gathered to say their goodbyes and bring the man's terrible suffering to an end. Of course, their suffering lingers on. The family lives many miles out in the woods. For safety's sake, they only go outside in pairs. And even then, only for emergencies or to visit the makeshift outhouse or to chop wood. And they always have some kind of weapon in hand. The rest of the time they stay indoors. When night comes, they lock themselves behind the Red Door—insulating them deeper in the house in case something sinister shows up in the darkness. One night something does break into the house. Travis hears it and alerts his father. Turns out it isn't a something, but a someone. A someone named Will. After subduing the man, they leave him tied to a tree for a while to ensure he isn't sick. Those who are infected turn in a matter of days, you see. But when Will doesn't get sick, they have to figure out what to do with him. And they have to consider the man's wife and child, too, whom he said were huddled a few miles away in an abandoned house. They have to consider the benefits of their pooled resources. And pooled manpower. And increased protection. They have to consider their safety, their responsibility, their … humanity. That's actually the toughest part. And it weighs on 17-year-old Travis like a massive stone. A stone that keeps sleep at bay and fills short slumbers with nightmares. Is it possible that this horror they've been a part of, this life they've lived locked behind a Red Door, has changed them in terrible ways? For that matter, if they do "the right thing" and invite Will and his family to come live in the house, will it change them, too. With each day that passes, with each choice made and each pain endured, Travis can't help but wonder: Which side of the Red Door do the monsters really live on? Positive ElementsThe film depicts people desperately trying to protect their loved ones, being willing to kill or die in that effort. (Unfortunately the film also suggests that in extreme and dire moments, it's the killing and dying that takes precedent.) Travis and his family members all talk of their love for one another.Spiritual ContentNone.Sexual ContentWhen Will and his wife Kim move into the house, they bring with them an element of sexuality that definitely impacts Travis. We see the young couple partially undressed in bed and naked together (but covered) in a bath tub. They kiss and caress. Meanwhile, Travis listens to them talk intimately while hiding above them in an attic passageway. He hears them making love (off camera). And when Travis and Kim meet by accident in the kitchen one night, his gaze is drawn to her chest, covered only by a thin T-shirt. She notices his attention and covers up.Recommended ResourceA Chicken's Guide to Talking Turkey With Your Kids About SexKevin LemanEven the bravest parents feel timid about discussing sex with their 8- to 14-year-olds! This resource offers reassuring, humorous, real-life anecdotes along with reliable information to help you with this challenging task.Buy NowViolent ContentAn old, diseased and withered man is shot in the head through a pillow. His body is doused with gasoline and burned. We're shown a painting of what appears to be the scene of a plague that's scattered with the dead and diseased. A woman and her small child are shot at a distance. Several attacking men with weapons are shot and killed as well. One of them is beaten and bloodied before being shot in the chest. Paul gets knocked to the ground and hit repeatedly in the face until he's lacerated and bleeding from several swollen wounds. Paul's truck is shot at, blowing out the side window and causing him to crash into a tree. A prone man gets hit in the face with a rifle butt, knocking him cold. He's then gagged and tied to a tree trunk. We see people stricken with the virus, their skin covered in boils with thick, bloody drool pouring out of their mouths. The family dog is found lying dead in a small pool of blood. Its body is burned.Crude or Profane LanguageA dozen or so f-words and a handful of s-words join one use of "b--ch" and a couple of harsh misuses of Jesus' name.Drug and Alcohol ContentPaul and Will share a glass of alcohol during a late-night conversation. And Paul swigs straight from the bottle after an intensely violent scene.Other Negative ElementsTravis tends to sneak about listening to private conversations. In a dream sequence, a diseased Kim straddles Travis' chest and drools into his mouth.ConclusionFrom this film's title and the way it's being marketed, it would be reasonable for viewers to slip into a theater seat expecting a typical lunge-and-gush creepfest. However, zombies and ghouls aren't the only things that watch us in the cinematic dead of night: Our own fears, anxieties and nightmares roam that shadowed void, too. And those things make It Comes at Night much more of a dark psychological drama than a typical nocturnal horror movie. This slowly ticking film asks us to ponder what parts of our humanity we'd be willing to abandon, and what parts we'd cling to, in the worst of times. It suggests that in life's most dire moments, even well-reasoned choices can turn awful. Alas, for all of the surprising thoughtfulness that this gradually boiling thriller provides, it also comes packing things bleak, befouled and bloody. And those messy bits should give many a discerning viewer pause. Perhaps more so, even, than a zombie in the wood.Pro-social ContentObjectionable ContentSummary AdvisoryPlot SummaryChristian BeliefsOther Belief SystemsAuthority RolesProfanity/ViolenceKissing/Sex/HomosexualityDiscussion TopicsAdditional Comments/NotesEpisode Reviews]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Debbie Schlussel
The New York Post
@DebbieSchlussel
(Reviewer Site/Bio)
  • Wknd Box Office: Megan Leavey, The Mummy, Paris Can Wait, It Comes At Night, My Cousin Rachel
    Blog Posts Movie Reviews The Mummy – Rated PG-13: I never saw the original “The Mummy” movie, but as with most other reboots, I’m not sure why this was and is necessary (other than to earn Hollywood types, including star Tom Cruise, a big paycheck). If the original Mummy movie was anything like this, I’m glad I missed it. This is a mess. About the first 25% of the movie is fine, but then it just becomes a totally ridiculous mess and never recovers. I mean, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (Russell Crowe, who famously attacked Jewish circumcision but not the Muslim kind)? Really? That needed to be inserted into this movie? Only because the scriptwriters wrote such a weak, awful cyclone of a story. The tornado of a script picks everything up in ts whirlwind and then throws it to the ground, severely damaged. In the original Mummy movie, the mummy is male. In this one, it’s a woman–an Egyptian princess (Moroccan actress, Sofia Boutella), who is robbed of her birthright when her father, the Pharoah, has a male heir. Yup, somehow this faux-feminist story is a justification for the chick mummy’s evil . . . or something. It’s hard to tell which way the movie is rooting, since it’s all over the place. The movie begins with the mummy-ette’s story, then fast forwards to contemporary times when American troops are still in Iraq (this is the second movie like that this week). Cruise and a fellow former soldier are dealers in stolen antiquities looted from the Middle East (there’s Hollywood’s anti-Western, evil-White-man-takes-from-the-Muslims narrative again). They are in the mountains, scoping out the ancient Iraqi city of Nineveh (which was Assyrian, back in the day). The city is now in the control of insurgents and they end up in the crossfire. Soon the insurgents are vanquished and leave, as a sinkhole swallows everything and reveals an ancient Egyptian tomb–that of the aforementioned Egyptian princess. Cruise, the other guy, and a sexy female archeologist enter the tomb and Cruise ends up freeing the princess’ tomb from a bath of mercury, allowing her spirit to come back to life. On the way back to the West, the princess’ evil spirit causes an air disaster over the UK. Then, the story starts moving and gets very stupid very quickly. Cruise, who should be dead, is miraculously alive and constantly sees the possessed ghost of his fellow antiquities robber. Cruise learns that the sexy archeologist is really evil and an acolyte of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. But then he is allied with her against the mummy. It doesn’t make sense, nor does most of this movie. The rest of the movie revolves around the mummy trying to get a sword re-united with a magical jewel that will complete the restoration of her powers and ability to destroy humanity. Or something. It’s kinda confusing. And apparently the sword is buried in an old (but newly discovered) Crusader burial ground under the London subway. HUH? Yeah, I know. It’s absurd. And not worth your ten-bucks-plus or nearly two hours of your life you’ll never get back. ONE MARX ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Want even more consensus?

Skip Rotten Tomatoes, they’re biased SJWs too afraid to criticize things like the Ghost Busters reboot. Avoid giving them ad revenue by using the minimalist alternative, Cinesift, for a quick aggregate:

 🗣️ Know of another conservative review that we’re missing?
Leave a link in the comments below or email us!  
Do you recommend seeing/supporting this film?

What’d you think? Let us know with a video:

Record a webcam review!

Or anonymous text review:

Submit your review
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
Submit
     
Cancel

Create your own review

Average rating:  
 0 reviews
Overall Hollywood Bs Average rating:  
 
Anti-patriotism Average rating:  
 
Misandry Average rating:  
 
Affirmative action Average rating:  
 
LGBTQ rstuvwxyz Average rating:  
 
Anti-God Average rating:  
 

Buy on Amazon:

Price: $10.16
Was: $19.99
⚠️  Comment freely, but please respect our young users.
👍🏻 Non PC comments/memes/vids/links 
👎🏻  Curse words / NSFW media / JQ stuff
👌🏻 Visit our 18+  free speech forum to avoid censorship.
⚠️ Keep your kids’ websurfing safe! Read this.

Share this page:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail