Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom

Not rated yet!
Director
Steven Spielberg
Runtime
1 h 58 min
Release Date
23 May 1984
Genres
Adventure, Action
Overview
After arriving in India, Indiana Jones is asked by a desperate village to find a mystical stone. He agrees – and stumbles upon a secret cult plotting a terrible plan in the catacombs of an ancient palace.
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Steve Sailer
Taki Mag



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Twilight Hit for the Same Reasons Knight and Day Flopped
    (”Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Believe it or not, it’s worth comparing a current box office smash—The Twilight Saga: Eclipse, a Mormon teen vampire romance—to a dud—Knight and Day, an expensive Cameron Diaz-Tom Cruise thriller parody. Knight and Day is expertly made and consistently entertaining, while the Twilight episode is talky and amateurish. Yet, the public’s preference makes sense, because Eclipse’s bizarre ambitions and common passions makes it more memorable than Knight and Day‘s facile technique. Both movies revolve around a young woman’s struggle to choose the man who will protect her in a savage world. Eclipse is the adaptation of the third of Mormon housewife Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight novels, the biggest bestsellers since J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter. Bella (pretty Kristen Stewart from last year’s Adventureland) is a human schoolgirl whose (follow me closely here) especially tasty-smelling blood drives vampires wild with bloodlust. Her lively scent has won the heart of the undead Edward (tween heartthrob Robert Pattinson), a gentlemanly vampire who strives manfully to keep his lusts under control. When a less civilized vampire army from Seattle comes hunting for her, however, the icy Edward realizes that he must ask for help in protecting Bella from his warm-blooded rival for her heart, Jacob, a weightlifting American Indian werewolf. I realize that this previous paragraph will likely strike you either as old news (if you are a 9 to 17-year-old girl) or as gibberish (if you aren’t). And I must admit to being baffled for long stretches of Eclipse. A weaker novelist than Rowling, Meyer less understands the adolescent girl’s mind than shares it. Her Bella epitomizes teen self-obsession, the ambition to have every boy fight over you and every girl hate you for it. Unlike Harry Potter’s world, which is so crisply-imagined that it’s a little limiting as metaphor, Meyer’s hazy imagination created a vampire cosmos where everything can symbolize anything. Sex, death, growing up, marriage, religion, race, family, whatever interests you, it will fit into Twilight’s cloudy cosmos. “Female moviegoers don’t seem to care as much as males do about empowered heroines.” For years, everybody thought Tom Cruise was the world’s greatest guy. Then, he nepotistically replaced his pit bull publicist Pat Kingsley with his sister. Soon, the hypomanic Scientologist was universally despised. Nonetheless, no other star’s films are as consistently quick-witted. Of his last ten films, only Lions and Lambs was bad, while Minority Report and Mission Impossible: III were excellent. Cruise’s track record at picking scripts is so good that you might wonder if he’s indeed getting good career advice down at the Scientology Celebrity Centre International, at least until you ponder the screenplay choices of fellow cultist John Travolta. It’s hard to market a movie in which Tom Cruise turns out to be the object rather than the subject. In Knight and Day, an expertly made and consistently entertaining soufflé of an action comedy, Diaz’s ditsy blonde has to decide whether Cruise’s character, an intensely competent and unflappably upbeat Eagle Scout turned master spy, is a terrorist maniac (like his ex-colleagues at CIA claim) or the man of her dreams, or both. If only, during their preposterously lethal globe-spanning chase, he wouldn’t keep asking her to help him out in the countless fights. Contrary to all the butt-kicking babe movies, such as, say, Charlie’s Angels (which starred Diaz as one of the three martial arts mistresses), in Knight and Day it turns out that 110-pound blondes don’t make good unstoppable killing machines. Diaz mostly winds up shrieking comically. Granted, no genre is more ripe for parody. Today’s butt-kicking babe films are particularly odd because current audiences also prefer girlier leading ladies than back in the Golden Age of such formidable femme fatales as Joan Crawford, Barbara Stanwyck, Marlene Dietrich, and Katherine Hepburn. Still, the public apparently doesn’t like to see its taste in movies spoofed. The tepid reaction to Knight and Day is reminiscent of the complaints about Kate Capshaw’s performance in Indiana Jones and Temple of Doom as a nightclub singer whose only contribution to the roaring action is to squeal. I can’t recall how many nerdy guys complained to me that Capshaw was a poor feminist role model compared to Karen Allen, who beat up bad guys in Raiders of the Lost Ark. All the fanboys hated Capshaw (although her director, Steven Spielberg, married her). Female moviegoers, in contrast, don’t seem to care as much as males do about empowered heroines. In Eclipse’s funniest scene, Bella is livid after beefcake Jacob tries to kiss her, even though Jacob knows perfectly well that she loves Edward. So, like an Angelina Jolie heroine, Bella hauls back and socks Jacob on his square jaw. Jacob, whose neck is wider than his head, doesn’t even flinch, but Bella sprains her own wrist, leaving her whimpering in pain. But that’s okay because everybody is soon fighting over Bella again, which she likes more than fighting herself. googletag.cmd.push(function() {googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1456852648633-0');}); if(display_ads_server){document.write('');}; SIGN UPDaily updates with TM’s latest // delete this script tag and use a "div.mce_inline_error{ XXX !important}" selector // or fill this in and it will be inlined when errors are generated var mc_custom_error_style = ''; var fnames = new Array();var ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';fnames[1]='FNAME';ftypes[1]='text';fnames[2]='LNAME';ftypes[2]='text';var err_style = ''; try{ err_style = mc_custom_error_style; } catch(e){ err_style = 'margin: 1em 0 0 0; padding: 1em 0.5em 0.5em 0.5em; background: ERROR_BGCOLOR none repeat scroll 0% 0%; font-weight: bold; float: left; z-index: 1; width: 80%; -moz-background-clip: -moz-initial; -moz-background-origin: -moz-initial; -moz-background-inline-policy: -moz-initial; color: ERROR_COLOR;'; } var mce_jQuery = jQuery.noConflict(); mce_jQuery(document).ready( function($) { var options = { errorClass: 'mce_inline_error', errorElement: 'div', errorStyle: err_style, onkeyup: function(){}, onfocusout:function(){}, onblur:function(){} }; var mce_validator = mce_jQuery("#mc-embedded-subscribe-form").validate(options); options = { url: 'http://takimag.us1.list-manage1.com/subscribe/post-json?u=0ba7696a8a378946b7e688500&id=f7706afea2&c=?', type: 'GET', dataType: 'json', contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8", beforeSubmit: function(){ mce_jQuery('#mce_tmp_error_msg').remove(); mce_jQuery('.datefield','#mc_embed_signup').each( function(){ var txt = 'filled'; var fields = new Array(); var i = 0; mce_jQuery(':text', this).each( function(){ fields[i] = this; i++; }); mce_jQuery(':hidden', this).each( function(){ if ( fields[0].value=='MM' && fields[1].value=='DD' && fields[2].value=='YYYY' ){ this.value = ''; } else if ( fields[0].value=='' && fields[1].value=='' && fields[2].value=='' ){ this.value = ''; } else { this.value = fields[0].value+'/'+fields[1].value+'/'+fields[2].value; } }); }); return mce_validator.form(); }, success: mce_success_cb }; mce_jQuery('#mc-embedded-subscribe-form').ajaxForm(options); }); function mce_success_cb(resp){ mce_jQuery('#mce-success-response').hide(); mce_jQuery('#mce-error-response').hide(); if (resp.result=="success"){ mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(resp.msg); mce_jQuery('#mc-embedded-subscribe-form').each(function(){ this.reset(); }); } else { var index = -1; var msg; try { var parts = resp.msg.split(' - ',2); if (parts[1]==undefined){ msg = resp.msg; } else { i = parseInt(parts[0]); if (i.toString() == parts[0]){ index = parts[0]; msg = parts[1]; } else { index = -1; msg = resp.msg; } } } catch(e){ index = -1; msg = resp.msg; } try{ if (index== -1){ mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(msg); } else { err_id = 'mce_tmp_error_msg'; html = '
    '+msg+''; var input_id = '#mc_embed_signup'; var f = mce_jQuery(input_id); if (ftypes[index]=='address'){ input_id = '#mce-'+fnames[index]+'-addr1'; f = mce_jQuery(input_id).parent().parent().get(0); } else if (ftypes[index]=='date'){ input_id = '#mce-'+fnames[index]+'-month'; f = mce_jQuery(input_id).parent().parent().get(0); } else { input_id = '#mce-'+fnames[index]; f = mce_jQuery().parent(input_id).get(0); } if (f){ mce_jQuery(f).append(html); mce_jQuery(input_id).focus(); } else { mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(msg); } } } catch(e){ mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(msg); } } } ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Christian Toto
Hollywood In Toto



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • 6 Reasons ‘Temple of Doom’ Is the 2nd Best Indy Film
    6 Reasons ‘Temple of Doom’ Is the 2nd Best Indy Film

    No sane soul doubts which Indiana Jones movie is the best (so far).

    “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” an homage to classic film serials, is a near-perfect movie. Action. Adventure.

    The post 6 Reasons ‘Temple of Doom’ Is the 2nd Best Indy Film appeared first on Hollywood in Toto.

    ...
    (Review Source)

The Federalist Staff
The Federalist



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The Music In 'Uncharted' Reflects An America Afraid Of Itself
    The Music In ‘Uncharted’ Reflects An America Afraid Of Itself Just contrast the theme music for ‘Uncharted’s’ Nick Drake with the theme music for Indiana Jones. May 16, 2016 By Christopher Badeaux Full disclosure: I can watch every Indiana Jones movie except the mythical fourth one again and again without pause, and I named 2009 the Year of the Video Game in no small part based on “Uncharted 2.” (My status as authoritative culture critic to my multiple children gives this extra weight.) I love both the movies and the games for capturing the explorer in the little boy of my soul and giving him a chance to face danger again. But thinking about the music of those two franchises, maybe it’s time to realize that my little explorer is kind of stupid. The franchises are about very different things, and if I’d ever bothered to listen instead of being entranced, I’d have realized it sooner. “Raiders March” (what almost all of us think of as The Indiana Jones Theme Song, much as we think of “The Skywalker Symphony” as The Star Wars Theme Song) is about Indiana Jones. It is brassy, sharp, punctuated—the song of an American. It’s brassy, bold, and proud, and certain of being an American at a time when Americans were (in the movies) exactly that. It’s not a coincidence that the music turns into something you could hear on a parade field with flags unfurling. Indiana Jones is America in many ways, and the story John Williams tells is one of a fearless and brave country facing danger down. The opening theme to Uncharted, “Nate’s Theme” (in all its incarnations) is, despite its name, not per se about Nathan Drake, the series’ lead character. It’s exotic, with strong wooden drum sounds, and evocatively exotic brass snarls and whispers. It’s what you’d expect to hear in an old movie about British administrators or explorers in the Raj with doom all around them. It suggests danger and action, but mournful tones always sneak back in. To the extent it’s about Drake, it’s the mournful, higher-paced bits that suggest not only a man barely grabbing a ledge, but one for whom doom is always coming. The theme to the most recent (and at least for now, final) Uncharted release only slowly builds up to the familiar notes, and stretches that mournful and reluctant theme out. In their openings, the advertisement for what’s to come, where Indiana Jones is buoyant and proud, filled with brass and short, trailing notes, Uncharted is mournful and dangerous. This doesn’t end with the openings; the composers for each were intent on painting very different pictures. Take “The Keeper of the Grail,” from “Indiana Jones and The Last Crusade.” It carries some of the same evocative notes as the opening, but only after a long, wary note that stretches almost painfully long; and it tells the story not only of Jones’s interaction with that last Grail knight, but his tentative, searching review of the putative Grails. It is fundamentally about Jones and how he sees and navigates the world. By contrast, “Pursuit” from “Uncharted 3: Drake’s Deception” is about the chase, and the environment: always, always, the drums come for you, but this time they’re faster, and there are worried and harried notes. It’s about how anyone would experience that environment and that moment. The contrast is easily explicable on one level: The Uncharted series is a bunch of video games, and to some extent, you want your gamers to identify with the character and feel like they’re in his shoes but still a little bit themselves. In a movie, you’re telling a story, where you seek the audience’s complete identification with the character—in Indiana Jones’s case, America. Therein is the more meaningful difference. Indiana Jones comes from a 1980s zeitgeist that believed in America and reflected a 1930s one that certainly did as well: An America that (repeatedly) punches Nazis because they’re evil, that faces supernatural horror with an everyman smirk, quip, or grimace, and that triumphs in the end. Uncharted has its birth in an age where America either doesn’t believe so strongly in itself (or at least, not so resolutely), and is telling the story of a younger man who happens to be American as he goes from place to place, barely but eventually climbing impossible rock faces and finding amazing treasures, only to lose them and risk the things he claims he values most in the process. Indiana Jones tells a story of hope, promise, and accomplishment in its music; Uncharted tells a story of a dark, dangerous world, with tragedy always around the corner. The first is a story for that brave little explorer; the second is a story for that older man who looks back fondly on him, but thinks the explorer’s adventures can never be. Christopher Badeaux is an attorney practicing in the Atlanta area. All opinions are entirely his own, because no one else would have them. Photo TmarTn2 / YouTube gaming Indiana Jones John Williams Nick Drake PlayStation theme music Uncharted Uncharted 4 video games Copyright © 2017 The Federalist, a wholly independent division of FDRLST Media, All Rights Reserved. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1463670073398-2'); }); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({mode:'thumbs-2r', container:'taboola-below-main-column-mix', placement:'below-main-column', target_type:'mix'}); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({flush:true}); 0 Comments /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'thefederalist23'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. comments powered by Disqus ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

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