In the Heart of the Sea

Not rated yet!
Director
Ron Howard
Runtime
2 h 02 min
Release Date
20 November 2015
Genres
Thriller, Drama, Adventure, Action, History
Overview
In the winter of 1820, the New England whaling ship Essex was assaulted by something no one could believe: a whale of mammoth size and will, and an almost human sense of vengeance. The real-life maritime disaster would inspire Herman Melville’s Moby Dick.  But that told only half the story.  “Heart of the Sea” reveals the encounter’s harrowing aftermath, as the ship’s surviving crew is pushed to their limits and forced to do the unthinkable to stay alive.  Braving storms, starvation, panic and despair, the men will call into question their deepest beliefs, from the value of their lives to the morality of their trade, as their captain searches for direction on the open sea and his first mate still seeks to bring the great whale down.
Staff ReviewsAround the Web ReviewsAudience Reviews

Check back soon when the reviews are out!

Or why not join our mailing list to stay up to date?

 

SIGN UP!

Box office recaps sent twice a month (maximum).

( ̄^ ̄)ゞ (☞゚ヮ゚)☞ No spam! ☜(゚ヮ゚☜)




 ✍🏻  > 🗡️   Want to join our team? Email us!  
Crosswalk2
Cross Walk



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • In the Heart of the Sea is Under-whale-ming
    Movies DVD Release Date: March 8, 2016Theatrical Release Date: December 11, 2015Rating: PG-13 (for intense sequences of action and peril, brief startling violence, and thematic material)Genre: ActionRun Time:  121 min.Director: Ron HowardCast: Chris Hemsworth, Ben Whishaw, Brendan Gleeson, Benjamin Walker, Cillian Murphy, Tom Holland, Frank Dillane It’s been a 15-year journey to bring Nathaniel Philbrick's In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex—published in 2000 and winner of the National Book Award—to the big screen. But that's nothing compared with the span of time—180 years—between the book's publication and events it recounts. If the story behind the book seems more familiar than that nearly two-century gap would indicate, that's because the cause of the whaleship's sinking—an attack on the ship by a sperm whale—inspired Herman Melville to write Moby Dick. That literary classic has, in turn, been adapted as a film or miniseries several times in the past two decades alone. Hopes were running high for the adaptation of Philbrick's book. Helmed by Oscar-winning director Ron Howard (A Beautiful Mind), the film was pushed back from an earlier release date until awards season—a possible sign that the studio behind the film, Warner Brothers, saw the film as an Oscar contender. But a subsequent lack of awards-season push for the film, as well as the opening date just one week before the release of the endlessly buzzed about new Star Wars movie, suggests another reason for In the Heart of the Sea's December release: perhaps the studio wants to minimize any bad press—and poor box office receipts—the film might generate. Related: Crosswalk.com Interviews Ron Howard & Chris Hemsworth about the FilmSEE ALSO: Big Miracle Is Hardly a Whale of a Tale googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-1'); }); Being a huge fan of Philbrick’s book—one of the best nonfiction books I've ever read—I was firmly in the "hopeful" camp, but having now seen In the Heart of the Sea, I lean toward the more negative interpretation. In the Heart of the Sea isn't outright bad so much as it is—if you'll pardon the pun—underwhaleming. The story of the Essex is framed in the film (unlike Philbrick's book) through the character of Melville (Ben Whishaw, Paddington), who, years after the ship's sinking, seeks out one of the few survivors of that disaster, Tom Nickerson (Brendan Gleeson, whose character is played as a young man by The Impossible's Tom Holland). Melville is intent on confirming the stories he's heard about a whale causing the ship's sinking, but Nickerson, haunted by memories of the event, isn't eager to provide fodder for a future Melville novel. Nickerson roughly dismisses the writer—until Nickerson's wife, tired of watching Nickerson's memories of the incident eat away at him, insists he unburden himself by sharing the grim details of what befell the Essex crew years earlier. The flashbacks, centering on the Essex's first mate Owen Chase (Chris Hemsworth, Thor) and his tension with Essex Captain George Pollard (Benjamin Walker, Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter), comprise most of the film's first half. Chase bids adieu to his wife and boards the Essex, uncertain of the timing of his return. Not only must the crew kill enough whales (sold for oil) to justify the mission, but the possibility of natural disasters, illness and shipwreck add to the danger of the trip. Howard handles the seafaring scenes competently, although there's little excitement early on. Not even a storm that Pollard steers the men into in order to toughen up the crew feels as threatening as it should. Worse, the film actually picks up whenever it returns to the Melville/Nickerson framing device—an appreciated uptick in terms of audience attention, but a bad sign for a story that sells itself on the events involving the Essex crew.SEE ALSO: Black Sea's Thrilling, Twisty Ride Freshens Up the Heist Genre The whale attack is memorably terrifying, but the whale is, unfortunately, more memorable than most of the crew members. Hemsworth, so good in Howard's 2013 film Rush, looks the part of a brawny first mate, but his character is less interesting than the situations he finds himself in: being attacked by the creature he needs to kill, and then trying to survive for months with little food. The second-hour story of the Essex survivors being forced to contemplate the unthinkable—cannibalism—in order to survive is much more dramatically compelling than the captain/first mate tension that characterized the first half of the film. It's difficult to salvage a story that takes more than an hour to offer any surprises. While Hemsworth and most of the crew are less than engaging, Gleeson and Whishaw are at their best in the framing story, which is given more time to develop as the film progresses. When Nickerson at last acknowledges to Melville what he refers to as his "abominations," we feel his sense of shame, followed by the release that his confession brings. It's a strong ending for Howard's middling tale of an angry whale, but the better telling of the Essex's fate is in Philbrick's book, which no 3D, CGI or other special effects can improve upon. That makes In the Heart of the Sea the latest in a never-ending line of stories that are superior on the printed page rather than on a movie-theater screen.SEE ALSO: Chris Hemsworth Explores Humanity’s Fallen Nature in In the Heart of the Sea CAUTIONS (may contain spoilers): googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-2'); }); if (gptClientWidth >= 992 && gptClientWidth <= 1000000) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-3'); }); Language/Profanity: Lord's name taken in vain; "da-n"; "son of a b--ch"; "stinks more than the devil's as--ho-e" Drinking/Smoking/Drugs: Nickerson's wife says he's going to drink himself to death if he doesn't confess what he did; she interrupts a discussion between her husband and Melville, claiming she's the only one who's sober Sex/Nudity: None Violence/Crime: Chase dangles a young man over the side of the ship, and the man throws up; a man falls to his death; a man is forced to enter into the cavity of a dead whale; a ship is destroyed by a whale; fire engulfs a ship; a dead body floats in the water; a suicide; cannibalism discussed; an emaciated sailor seen with a large human bone next to him; human skeletons found Religion/Morals/Marriage: A prayer for the ship's safe return; a whale is referred to as "that demon"; other dialogue includes, "the devil has unspoken secrets"; characters say, "God be with you.”/“And with you.”; dark deeds are referred to as "abominations" Publication date: December 10, 2015 ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Chris Hemsworth Explores Humanity's Fallen Nature in In the Heart of the Sea
    Movies Chris Hemsworth and Ron Howard sit down with Crosswalk's own Ryan Duncan to discuss how pride, faith, and sacrifice ultimately shaped "In the Heart of the Sea."]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

John Nolte2
Daily Wire / Breitbart



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • ‘In the Heart of the Sea’ Review: A Big-Budget TV Movie
    Director Ron Howard certainly knows where to place a camera. Naturally, most of the Big Scenes involving the killer whale are cartoonish CGI, but you cannot argue with the beauty of the composition. The problem is the story. Believe it or not, the killer whale is not The Story — the story is a belabored and unoriginal one of men suffering and dying and barely surviving in lifeboats. For the last hour, you’re deluged with “Unbreakable” flashbacks and wondering what the hell happened to that big whale. Apparently, “In the Heart of the Sea” is based on the true-life tale that inspired Herman Melville’s masterpiece of obsession and adventure, “Moby Dick.” That’s all well and good, but the last thing this overlong movie needed was a framing device involving Melville actually being told the story. The characters are caricatures. Chris Hemsworth is the hale and hearty first mate. Benjamin Walker is the tightly wound, insecure captain. Naturally, there’s a an orphaned boy on board who is about to become a man because there is always an orphaned boy on board who is about to become a man.  The whale attack sequences are okay, but nothing that would’ve made you sit
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • 'In the Heart of the Sea' Review: A Big-Budget TV Movie
    Director Ron Howard certainly knows where to place a camera. Naturally, most of the Big Scenes involving the killer whale are cartoonish CGI, but you cannot argue with the beauty of the composition. The problem is the story. Believe it or not, the killer whale is not The Story — the story is a belabored and unoriginal one of men suffering and dying and barely surviving in lifeboats. For the last hour, you’re deluged with “Unbreakable” flashbacks and wondering what the hell happened to that big whale. Apparently, “In the Heart of the Sea” is based on the true-life tale that inspired Herman Melville’s masterpiece of obsession and adventure, “Moby Dick.” That’s all well and good, but the last thing this overlong movie needed was a framing device involving Melville actually being told the story. The characters are caricatures. Chris Hemsworth is the hale and hearty first mate. Benjamin Walker is the tightly wound, insecure captain. Naturally, there’s a an orphaned boy on board who is about to become a man because there is always an orphaned boy on board who is about to become a man.  The whale attack sequences are okay, but nothing that would’ve made you sit
    ...
    (Review Source)

Plugged In2
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • In the Heart of the Sea
    Action/AdventureDrama We hope this review was both interesting and useful. Please share it with family and friends who would benefit from it as well.Movie Review"Here there be monsters," read the old maps, covered with pictures of deep-dwelling leviathans. Pictures of undersea dragons or massive sea serpents. Pictures of gigantic whales, real-life creatures perhaps stranger than even some of the made-up ones. They breathe from the tops of their heads. They sing sirens' songs. Their babies are bigger than a lifeboat. For centuries, they were beasts of dream and nightmare—graceful and terrible and mysterious. But by the 19th century, they were merely business. By then, intrepid hunters had found you could bring down a whale through skill and daring. And it became known that many whales—particularly the mighty sperm whale—bore liquid gold in their bodies. Whale oil, plumbed from the great head of a sperm whale, proved to be the most efficient lighting and heating oil around. The world loved this clean-burning, efficient liquid, and whaling became one of the great industries of the time. Its capital was Nantucket, Mass., wherein men would sign up by the hundreds and even thousands for a whaling ship—to make an honest living if the fishing was good, to make a fortune if it was great. The Essex is one such ship—a rugged veteran of whaling's richest waters, and recently refitted at great expense. Owen Chase thought he'd be the vessel's captain, but the owners said no. Instead, they give the helm to George Pollard, standard-bearer for one of Nantucket's most prestigious (and richest) whaling families, bestowing the title of first mate upon Chase. Next time, they tell Chase. Bring home 2,000 barrels of oil, and next time you'll be captain. Chase grumbles but agrees, and soon the Essex sails out of port with a crew steeled for at least a year at sea. Even a landlubber boy like 14-year-old Tom Nickerson, who'd never set foot on a ship before, had fire in his eyes. Alas, most of the Essex's traditional hunting grounds have been all fished out. Whales, once as plentiful as buffalo on the plains, are disappearing. Then, when the boat stops in Ecuador for repairs and supplies, Pollard and Chase hear about a new hunting ground—one a long sail from any land, but so full of whales you can walk across them. Pollard and Chase—who are beginning to hate the very sight of each other—think it might be their best hope to bag some big ones, fill the ship's hold and finally sail for home. But before they leave, a one-armed ship's captain warns them that the hunting there has its dangers. After all, his own ship sailed away from those waters nearly empty-handed after losing six of its men. Those waters, the captain says, are haunted by a great, white whale, perhaps 100 feet long. A whale too big to kill, a whale too fast to outrun. Here, in those promising hunting grounds, there be monsters.Positive ElementsIn the Heart of the Sea is based on a nonfiction book penned by Nathaniel Philbrick and is, of course, predicated on the true story of the Essex—a whaling ship that was sunk by a whale, events that became the inspiration for Herman Melville's classic novel Moby Dick. In truth, the whale was only the beginning of the story of this ill-fated crew. But throughout their many travails, the survivors showed courage, spirit and a strong will to live. Some show a willingness to die for their comrades. While working on these whaling boats was always a test of mettle, Chase seems blessed with a particularly deep wellspring of gumption. He runs a tight ship, but when one of his mates gets into trouble, he's got the skill and willingness to scramble up the sails and solve the problem himself (risking his life to do so). He encourages young Tom, too—even as he insists the boy do every job assigned to him (and some of them are pretty gross). Oh, and the man also clearly loves his wife. Pollard is more insecure aboard the ship. And when things don't go right, he at first tries to blame Chase. But as time goes on and the trials become ever more severe, the two men come to an understanding. They even grow to respect each other. The story is told in flashback by a much older Tom Nickerson, spilling his strange tale to Mr. Melville himself. Tom is reluctant to tell it at first, but his wife believes that the secrets he's stored away are eating him up inside. She encourages him to finally tell what truly happened to the Essex, as a form of secular confession. And, indeed, the process of telling seems to be cathartic for Tom—a cleansing of sorts—and a nice illustration of the Christian adage that the "truth will set you free." Speaking of which …Spiritual ContentWhile the discussion is not explicitly a religious confession, no one shies away from the quasi-religious meaning of it all. Tom's wife tells Melville that Tom's soul is "in torment and in need of confession." When Tom rejects Melville's offer to pay him for a month's lodging for a night of storytelling—Tom calls it at first "a devil's bargain." Melville retorts that it is just the opposite: "The devil loves unspoken secrets, especially those that fester in a man's soul." Clearly, religion was an important aspect of almost everyone's daily life in these days, and life aboard the Essex is not so different. Granted, it's a rougher life, but sailors still routinely talk about God's blessings and favor. Before the ship sets sail, a bevy of black-clad worshippers pray over the boat, asking for God's blessing on the voyage and thanking God for the "mighty whale." This proves to be a bit of foreshadowing over just what sort of "gift" the whale is. Pollard believes it's a most pragmatic gift. He tells Chase that God gave man the earth and everything in it, and it's up to man to "bend nature to our will." Chase comes to see the trials that have beset the crew as more of a divine warning. It's God's creation that they're messing with, after all, and perhaps they should approach it with more humility. "We're specks," he says. "Dust."Sexual ContentA sailor carves an image of a woman with large, bare breasts on a whalebone—telling an onlooker that it's his wife. Men leer at and cavort with women (perhaps prostitutes) in Nantucket and elsewhere. Chase kisses his wife before he leaves—lifting her up as she wraps her legs around him.Recommended ResourceA Chicken's Guide to Talking Turkey With Your Kids About SexKevin LemanEven the bravest parents feel timid about discussing sex with their 8- to 14-year-olds! This resource offers reassuring, humorous, real-life anecdotes along with reliable information to help you with this challenging task.Buy NowViolent ContentMost of us were raised in an age when most of mankind was trying to save the whales, not kill them. So for many of us, I think, whaling can look a little barbaric. Men throw harpoons into the great beasts as their blood clouds the water. Blood spews from an animal's blowhole, spattering the faces of the sailors. We see one great beast die in the hunt—speared again and again before being butchered. While a good chunk of the whale is carved up aboard the Essex, sharks try to get at the rest, which is left on the side of the boat. Precious whale oil is found in the sperm whale's head, as mentioned, necessitating the cutting of a jagged hole in the top. Tom (the smallest crew member) is then forced through that hole, crawling into the cavernous, gory head with a bucket. The white whale rams and cracks the Essex's hull. Speared with a harpoon, it pulls the attached rope across the ship's deck, taking down masts and more. It overturns boats and, of course, kills men. Some are killed by falling debris, but one seems to be crushed by the whale itself. Men are swept overboard. And they nearly die in a fire fueled by, of course, whale oil. A man seems to be slowly dying from a bloody head wound. Guns are pointed at people. Tom's hands suffer a bloody rope burn. On a deserted island, Essex sailors discover the remains of castaways. [Spoiler Warning] After the whale wrecks the Essex, its survivors are left stranded in the middle of the ocean, and many slowly starve to death. The whaleboats they're using—not meant for long voyages—become separated, and each becomes a pit of horror. In one vessel, as people die, the bodies are kept aboard as food. (We don't see them being eaten, but Tom describes in some detail what was involved.) In the other boat, things are even worse: The survivors begin to draw lots as to who will be shot and cannibalized. When Captain Pollard draws the short straw, a crewman (the captain's cousin) suggests they draw straws again. But when the captain refuses, the man, instead of firing the gun at Pollard's head, points it at his own and pulls the trigger.Crude or Profane LanguageAbout 15 uses of "d--n," nearly half of those used in conjunction with God's name. More sporadic curses include "a--," "b--ch" and "h---."Drug and Alcohol ContentOne of the shipmates seems to be a recovering alcoholic (though in those days, of course, he wouldn't have been labeled as such). He refuses drink throughout the voyage—"not a drop," he says, sometimes to the confusion and even consternation of others. He keeps a bottle of liquor close to him when the Essex sinks, but when he seems close to death on a deserted island and Chase offers to open the bottle for him, Joy refuses. "If it comes to that, I think I can manage," he says. Others drink wine, and Melville and Tom guzzle lots of whiskey during Tom's long story. Drink, it's suggested, has been an ongoing problem for Tom—trying to wash away his memories with liquor, his wife suggests. And when the story is over and Tom tries to refuse Melville's payment, Mrs. Nickerson snatches the cash up—on account that she's the "one person in this conversation who's sober." Other Negative ElementsYoung Tom, suffering from seasickness, is hauled topside by Chase, who hangs him over the railing in an effort to scare the nausea away. It doesn't work: Tom vomits all over Chase's shoes.ConclusionThe first stage of In the Heart of the Sea feels like an old-fashioned adventure yarn—a tale of brave men facing the elements and fighting their own fears to achieve something remarkable. The second gives us a slower, sparser story no less remarkable. It's about men who have already faced the elements … and lost. Their only goal now is to merely survive—and that, alone, feels a bit like a miracle. These sailors often, almost subconsciously, ask for God's protection and blessing. And I'm pretty sure that once the survivors arrived on shore safely, they offered a prayer of thanks. But the movie suggests that God may have wanted to teach them a lesson, too. And while the surface story is pretty straightforward, there glides underneath (like the white whale itself) a spiritually tinged parable. The very talented and quite deliberate film director Ron Howard takes the time to connect threads between the 1820s' hunger for oil and our own. Now, as then, oil is big business. And he seems to suggest that we, too, could be messing with forces we don't really understand—forces that could, perhaps, destroy us. While that message isn't particularly pushy or preachy onscreen, it's there. And the idea that God could be punishing man's presumptive hubris (a theme some have teased out of Melville's Moby Dick, too) is an interesting one (the political implications of which I'll consciously skirt in this review). Content concerns take a more direct approach. The privations we see—and what is required because of them—can feel harsh and visceral. Language can be a tad rough. And I think many viewers, especially younger ones, will be more disturbed by the killing of one whale here than the death of several men. We're used to men dying in our movies, after all. The slaughter of one of these pretty majestic animals is rarer, and as such it hits harder. And there's a pretty large lesson to learn from that as well.Pro-social ContentObjectionable ContentSummary AdvisoryPlot SummaryChristian BeliefsOther Belief SystemsAuthority RolesProfanity/ViolenceKissing/Sex/HomosexualityDiscussion TopicsAdditional Comments/NotesEpisode Reviews]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

John Hanlon2
John Hanlon Reviews



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • In the Heart of the Sea
    In the 1995 drama Apollo 13, sales director Ron Howard told the true story of a group of astronauts who were stranded in space after their mission fell apart. The film sought to capture what it was like for those men, who were adrift in space and...
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • The Movies of 2015
    (”In the Heart of the Sea” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The end of 2016 is quickly approaching. With that in mind, patient I went back and created a list of all of the films that I reviewed this year and the different ratings I gave them. Of course, story this isn’t a complete list of all of the films I saw this year....
    ...
    (Review Source)

Michael Medved1



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • In the Heart of the Sea
    ...
    (Review Source)

Quintus Curtius1
Fortress of the Mind



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • A Few Recent Movies
    film2

    I watch a lot of movies.  You’d be surprised at the ways that movies can generate new ideas in you, or take you in new directions.  I haven’t written any film reviews in a while, so I thought this would be a good time to take a break from some of my more serious posts in recent days.  Here are my impressions on a handful of recent films.

    Continue reading

    ...
    (Review Source)

PJ Media Staff1
PJ Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Summer Movie Update, with Coming Attractions
    Klavan On The Culture var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Marvel's Ant-Man - Trailer 1', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); Ant-Man's not bad at all! Marvel's smallest super hero doesn't exactly deliver an epic, but he manages to produce a smart, humorous, emotionally sound and exciting addition to the summer super-hero genre. Paul Rudd has mastered the art of being likable, and Michael Douglas has inherited Paul Newman's mantle of onscreen class: the moment he walks on, everyone else just seems to be in a lesser league. (The coolest part of the film is the flashback to Douglas's younger self. Some real CGI magic. Wish they could do it in real life!) Lost girl Evangeline Lilly should probably sue the producers for making that sweet face of hers look almost forbidding, but never mind, it's a good part and she does it well. The smartest thing the filmmakers did is rely on the human interactions to make the story work. They let the theme of father-daughter relationships play out at length before getting down to the ant-sized action. The reason this is such a masterstroke is that Ant-Man just isn't that interesting as a superhero. Watching a dude shout, "Come on, gang, let's get em!" to a bunch of ants...  just not that cool. The Thomas the Tank Engine train set chase is fun though. It's all fun. A nice evening out, especially with kids. (They use the s-word twice. Normally I wouldn't care, but I thought it unnecessary in a picture so otherwise suitable for 10-year-olds.) class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/andrewklavan/2015/8/26/summer-movie-update-with-coming-attractions/ previous Page 1 of 2 next   ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

The Federalist Staff1

Want even more consensus?

Skip Rotten Tomatoes, they’re biased SJWs too afraid to criticize things like the Ghost Busters reboot. Avoid giving them ad revenue by using the minimalist alternative, Cinesift, for a quick aggregate:

 🗣️ Know of another conservative review that we’re missing?
Leave a link in the comments below or email us!  

What’d you think? Let us know with a video:

Record a webcam review!

Or anonymous text review:

Submit your review
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
Submit
     
Cancel

Create your own review

Average rating:  
 0 reviews
Overall Hollywood Bs Average rating:  
 
Anti-patriotism Average rating:  
 
Misandry Average rating:  
 
Affirmative action Average rating:  
 
LGBTQ rstuvwxyz Average rating:  
 
Anti-God Average rating:  
 

Buy on Amazon:
⚠️  Comment freely, but please respect our young users.
👍🏻 Non PC comments/memes/vids/links 
👎🏻  Curse words / NSFW media / JQ stuff
👌🏻 Visit our 18+  free speech forum to avoid censorship.
⚠️ Keep your kids’ websurfing safe! Read this.

Share this page:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail