Ice Age

Not rated yet!
Director
Chris Wedge
Runtime
1 h 21 min
Release Date
10 March 2002
Genres
Animation, Comedy, Family, Adventure
Overview
With the impending ice age almost upon them, a mismatched trio of prehistoric critters – Manny the woolly mammoth, Diego the saber-toothed tiger and Sid the giant sloth – find an orphaned infant and decide to return it to its human parents. Along the way, the unlikely allies become friends but, when enemies attack, their quest takes on far nobler aims.
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Crosswalk2
Cross Walk



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Ice Age
    Movies from Film Forum, 03/21/02Blue Sky Studios has entered the big leagues of animated features. Chris Wedge's Ice Age is the first feature-length CGI cartoon from the studio, which was recently acquired by 20th Century Fox after their own animation company folded following the disappointment of Titan A.E.Ice Age is a story about a wooly mammoth named Manfred (Ray Romano) and a clumsy sloth named Sid (John Leguizamo) who form an unlikely, reluctant friendship as they try to return an abandoned human child to its clan of early humans. They must overcome a series of environmental obstacles and avoid the wiles of sabertooth tigers, who are hunting the child for vengeance.Ice Age is a delightful surprise—a well-told story, brought to life with impressive animation. Leguizamo, Romano, and Denis Leary (who voices a tiger named Diego) provide excellent voice work. Many will be relieved to know that the film avoids the typically annoying pop songs. And there's a preference for Road Runner vs. Wile E. Coyote humor rather than the crass innuendos and pop culture references of Shrek. Sure, it's a familiar story, with elements of Bambi, The Lion King, The Jungle Book, and a dozen other children's classics. But it's not a rip-off. At only 75 minutes long, it should keep your kids' attention, and yours. You'll find my full review at Looking Closer."Ice Age isn't perfect," writes J. Robert Parks (The Phantom Tollbooth). "It feels 15 minutes too long. But as Disney seems to have abandoned its award-winning formula, it's nice to see another studio pick up where Disney left off. [It's] a movie your kids will love and you'll enjoy."At Hollywood Jesus, David Bruce finds examples of selfless love throughout the story, and he points out an echo of Christ in the transforming power of a child in the lives of his caretakers: "The child comes into a world of enemies and furnishes the common ground on which reconciliation can occur." googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-1'); }); Michael Elliott (Movie Parables) writes, "The set designs are imaginative and the main characters are expressive and well defined." He says the film's theme of cooperation "resonates with us because God has called us to operate as one, much like a herd."The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops's critic says, "Wedge enlivens the proceedings with bouncy physical humor, punchy one-liners and skillfully drawn animation while tossing in a light lesson on familial love, no matter who makes up the family unit."Holly McClure (Crosswalk) says, "I enjoyed this movie a lot more than I thought I would. It's a perfect movie to take your kids to, and you'll enjoy sitting through it yourself."Bob Smithouser (Focus on the Family) applauds it as well: "[It] benefits from clever writing, delightfully wacky voice work by John Leguizamo, and some of the wildest action and slapstick possible without an anvil and a 'That's all folks!'""Ice Age has neither the invention and creativity of Monsters Inc. nor the satiric wit of Shrek," says Steven D. Greydanus (Decent Films), "but it still emerges as the best new family film of the season. [It] blends slapstick, occasionally sly adult humor, and, yes, a couple of poop jokes—though parents may rest assured that it doesn't even approach Shrek-like levels of low humor."Phil Boatwright (The Movie Reporter) calls it "action filled comedy with tons of heart."Paul Bicking (Preview) cautions parents that "Younger audiences may find some scenes disturbing, such as the child's mother disappearing in a river, an intense battle with Diego's tiger pack, and cave drawings depicting men attacking a mammoth family." He points out a scene of one character risking his life for another, and says, "For Christians, the line stirs memories of Christ giving up his life to save many." Is he worried about the movie's nods to evolutionary theory? "One humorous scene in an ice cave suggests Darwin's theory of evolution but a following scene includes a UFO stuck in ice, which could equate Darwin's ideas with those of extraterrestrial life."Lisa Rice (Movieguide) objects to the "politically correct" elements of "anti-hunting, evolution, possible homosexual inferences." But she also objects to "politically correct" elements of "environmentalism … and jabs at fear-based 'end of the world' religious zealots." Hmmmm. "To counter this," Rice argues, "there was a very strong endorsement of marriage, a life laid down in sacrifice for another and a strong portrayal of the necessity of unity before victory."Mainstream critics were divided over the movie. Some found it too formulaic, while others appreciated how much Wedge accomplished in 75 minutes.MaryAnn Johanson (The Flick Filosopher) dismisses it as formulaic and bland: "The computer animation may be lovely … but that can't make up for a humdrum script that steamrollers the audience with an overly sentimental story we've seen too many times before." googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-2'); }); if (gptClientWidth >= 992 && gptClientWidth <= 1000000) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-3'); }); But Roger Ebert (Chicago Sun-Times) says, "The filmmakers have all worked together to really see and love these characters, who are not 'cartoon animals' but as quirky and individual as human actors, and more engaging than most." ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Ice: One for the Ages
    Movies Ice Age - PGBest for: Kids 8 to adultsWhat it's about: This animated adventure takes place 20,000 years ago, when the creatures were migrating to escape the new Ice Age, which starts accidentally after a scrawny Scrat (a combination of squirrel and rat) buries his acorn in the cracked ice. Sid (voiced by John Leguizamo) is a fast-talking sloth who befriends Manny (Ray Romano), a giant woolly mammoth who reluctantly lets Sid tag along. When the two find an abandoned baby, they decide to return the cute little bundle of joy named Roshan to his human tribe. Along the way, they encounter a sabertooth tiger named Diego (voiced by Denis Leary) who has a plan for the three unsuspecting travelers.The good: I knew this movie would be funny, but I didn't expect it to be tender and moving as well. Just hearing Romano's voice makes me laugh; his sarcastic delivery makes him perfect for parts like this. Leguizamo is likewise perfectly cast as the annoying sidekick. The two create a sort of "Odd Couple." Throw in Leary's voice and Scrat's perpetual attempt to bury his nut in the snow and you have an unusual story the whole family will laugh at -- one the adults will enjoy as much as the kids. In fact, adults will get jokes that will sail over their kids' heads. Lots of unique scenes (the trio slide through a glacier, birds protect melons in a weird dance, Sid spots a spaceship trapped in ice, they all go tubing through a mountain) are creatively animated in a style everyone will enjoy.The not-so-good: A few characters die, but their deaths only are suggested (birds fall in a hole, a mother slips into the water leaving her baby behind, a tiger is killed).Offensive language: Some crude language.Sexual situations: NoneViolence: A gang of sabers attack Manny and Sid.Parental advisory: Kids 8 and older will enjoy this story the most because of the humor between the animals and the baby.Bottom Line: I enjoyed this movie a lot more than I thought I would because of the jokes and hilarious situations. It's a perfect movie to take your kids to, and you'll enjoy sitting through it yourself. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-1'); }); ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

PJ Media Staff1
PJ Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Ice Age 4: A Floe Too Far
    Lifestyle We go to movies presumably to enjoy a good story. Yes, the writing is important, as are the acting, cinematography, score, set design — all the myriad things that must work together in service of the story. They are but tools intended for a larger purpose. Of course, too often one or more tools fail or the filmmakers put too much emphasis on them and forget the story altogether.That seems to be the case with Ice Age: Continental Drift, the fourth installment of the Ice Age franchise by Blue Sky Studios. Terrific computer animation in digital 3D renders crisp detail in the animals’ fur and performs a virtuoso dance of light and shadow on ice and water.But the movie feels overstuffed with way too many barely developed characters. The story could easily have been cut by a third and its building blocks could have been more artfully arranged. The film feels workmanlike, adequate but lacking zest. While the earlier installments had the obligatory subtext about doing the right thing and the importance of working together, the lessons in Continental Drift feel forced. Yes, kids, it’s important to obey your parents, value your friends, and not get caught up in the wrong crowd — good lessons all, but they come with the subtlety of an elbow to the ribs.As with the first three Ice Ages, there are plenty of sight gags and pratfalls along the way with the usual gross-out jokes. And as always, Scrat the proto rat is the best part of these stories, with his Gilligan-like ability to blow a sure thing and a single-mindedness that makes Wile E. Coyote look positively ambivalent. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2012/7/13/ice-age-4-a-floe-too-far/ previous Page 1 of 3 next   ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Counter Currents Staff1
Counter Currents Publishing



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

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  • Deconstructing Disney?
    (”Ice Age” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    [1]2,075 words

    Popular culture does not matter, and people who read political messages into children’s television programs and movies are guilty of bad faith at best and willful malevolence at worst. Art is independent of politics and has a meaning all its own. All people of good will should be able to agree that at least children’s programming isn’t furthering some kind of nefarious agenda. If parents don’t like it, they can always change the channel. Besides, whatever meaning is somehow encoded in a film, in the end, it’s just a movie.

    Unless we say it’s racist. Or worse, anti-Semitic.

    Fashionable liberals around the interwebs are rejoicing at the latest chapter in the Fox News Follies. Painfully square contributors on America’s News Channel occasionally humiliate themselves with the strange mix of paranoia and political correctness that characterizes the American Right, and liberals are triumphantly taking to their stomping grounds at Media Matters and the Huffington Post to congratulate themselves on their superior intelligence (like not falling for the idea there’s a link between race and IQ).

    The Fox Business Channel hosted a seven minute segment [2] that asked whether the new movie The Muppets is actually a left wing plot to indoctrinate children against capitalism. The plot (such as it is) involves the Muppets trying to combat the evil designs of the creatively named “Tex Richman” to destroy the Muppet Theater and drill for the oil recently found underneath. Eric Bolling of the Media Research Center intones, “It’s amazing how far the Left will go . . .  to manipulate your kids . . . to give them the anti-corporate message.” Andrea Tantaros agreed that it was “brainwashing.” Dan Gainor went so far [3]as to connect this to the Occupy Wall Street movement and a larger history of children’s programming pushing environmentalism. “What is this, Communist China?” he cried.

    Gainor’s charge against Commissar Kermit flops because The Muppets has nothing to do with the environment. Still, movement conservatives can point to a host of children’s films [4] that subtly (and not too subtly) push liberal political messages. There’s the anti-gun message of The Iron Giant, environmental messages in Happy Feet, Ice Age, and Wall-E, criticism of the energy industry in Cars 2, and of course the Bible-thumping bad guy general in Battle for Terra, just for starters.

    In his revealing book Primetime Propaganda: The True Story of How the Left Took Over Your TV [5] Jewish conservative Ben Shapiro exposes [6] television executives bragging about how they pushed political messages on television specifically as a “fuck you to the right wing.” This included children’s programming, as executives from Sesame Street admitted they used the program to push messages [7] about homosexuality, racial diversity, pacifism, and left wing economics. Shapiro notes that left wing media executives felt comfortable openly telling him about their use of the media because they assumed that as a Jew and a Harvard graduate, he must agree with them.

    Nonetheless, both liberals and mainstream news sources have mocked Fox’s alarmism over the likes of Miss Piggy and Gonzo. The Chicago Sun-Times [8], Washington Post [9], and others predictably ridiculed and dismissed the claims. The Huffington Post piled on [10], as did Conan O’Brien [11]. Media Matters wrote several follow up stories [12] and mocked the “stupidity” of the Right for criticizing other children’s programs. Even the Religious Right’s outpost on the Internet, Worldnetdaily, called [13] the idea laughable. The Washington Monthly summed it all up [14] by saying, “when far-right Fox personalities perceive secret political messages from the Muppets, it’s a reminder that conservatives sometimes have too much time on their hands.” Unless you are some bible-beating hick or movement conservative looking to sell books, we can all agree that sophisticated people know there is no secret plot to force views on your kids.

    Except of course when it comes to Disney.

    December 5, 2011 was the 110th anniversary of the birth of Walt Disney, the progenitor of some of the most iconic characters and stories in American culture. Despite, or perhaps because of his importance in developing “Americana,” it is a remarkably consistent meme in contemporary media that Walt Disney was an anti-Semite or a secret Nazi. Marc Eliot’s Walt Disney: Hollywood’s Dark Prince [15]has been the source of numerous urban legends about Disney’s supposed anti-Semitism and secret National Socialist fantasies. Despite the lack of concrete evidence for these charges, Disney’s anti-Semitism has become something that everyone “knows” and is a staple of jokes and allusions in the media — just like J. Edgar Hoover’s supposed homosexuality and cross-dressing. Many of these anti-Disney jokes and parodies are quite funny, but all indicate a deeper and more disturbing rot in the American consciousness.

    Disney, along with just about every other studio, did its part during the Crusade to Save the Soviet Union by supporting the war effort and creating propaganda cartoons [16]. The most famous, Donald Duck in “Der Fuhrer’s Face [17],” is interesting because it identifies the rightness of the American cause with material prosperity.  National Socialist Germany is mocked because people can’t enjoy a breakfast of bacon and eggs every morning, as if Depression era America were awash in prosperity. The cartoon also doesn’t age well, as the stereotypically Italian Mussolini, the overtly racist portrayal of Hirohito, and the implied homosexuality of the Hermann Göring stand-in, seem, shall we say, insensitive by modern standards. Like other propaganda of the time, these cartoons reveal that whatever America thought it was fighting for, it wasn’t racial egalitarianism. Nonetheless, Disney was hardly a bastion of pro-German sentiment.

    That hasn’t stopped it from being common knowledge that Disney was actually a Nazi sympathizer. In a sixth season episode of The Simpsons, “Itchy and Scratchy Land [18],” the family visits a parallel to Walt Disney World. A film about the company’s founder Roger Meyers Sr., takes care to note that he was beloved by the entire world, “except in 1938, when he was criticized for his controversial cartoon, ‘Nazi Supermen Are Our Superiors.’” Family Guy manages to combine the two great myths about Walt Disney, being frozen after his death and hating Jews:

    http://youtu.be/YAcIzPmOhBQ [19]

    Saturday Night Live also accomplished the same trick: http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live/video/high-school-musical-4/1085201 [20]

    This is just a reflection of the larger Culture of Critique — it is precisely because Disney represents “Americana” that it is evil. While not a Nazi, Walt Disney was a fervent anti-Communist and gave favorable testimony [21] to the House Un-American Activities Committee against Communists in the movie industry.

    As a contemporary political actor, the Disney Corporation hardly plays a positive role. After its founder’s death, Jewish executive eventually replaced the Disney family, and the corporation promotes the same kind of Cultural Marxist viewpoints and policies that every other studio does. Through its programming for children and “tweens,” Disney dresses up the Zeitgeist of the Kali Yuga for the next generation while churning out a menagerie of child stars turned celebrities like Miley Cyrus, Britney Spears, and Christina Aguilera that will poison the minds of white youth [22] even as they poison themselves.

    However, like America itself, the essence of Disney is Eurocentric, traditional, and implicitly white. Just as leftists know that talk of the “Real America” is a dog whistle appeal to “White America,” Disney its core represents traditional Western storytelling, standards of beauty, and appeals to a time when the United States looked like “Main Street USA [23]” — a clean, orderly, and prosperous white America that was getting better every day.

    Disney purchased the Muppets in 2004, but the kinds of movies and stories that are identified with the company are the portrayals of fairy tales and Disney Princesses that are inseparable from the company’s heritage. Therefore, while right wing conspiracy mongering about “Communist Muppets” is a subject of predictable SWPL mockery, an entire industry and academic discipline has grown up around deconstructing the institutional racism of Disney.

    Entire college classes are dedicated to analyzing (and condemning) the politics of race, class, and sexuality in Disney films. Dr. Virginia Bonner writes [24] grimly that, in her class, students will learn that Disney movies are not “innocent” or simple “entertainment.” Professor Andi Stern in her own class about “Deconstructing Disney” complains [25] about the lack of strong female characters in Disney movies.  Occasionally, an illustration of “Deconstructing Disney Princesses [26]” makes the rounds online. Of course, that hasn’t stopped complaints about how there were no black “princesses.” When they finally did include one, the movie bombed [27], and the Huffington Post dutifully complained [28] it wasn’t good enough and probably racist.

    The usual denunciations of Disney are staples of academic publishing in journals, books, and on the internet. With titles like Deconstructing Disney [29] or From Mouse to Mermaid: The Politics of Film, Gender and Culture [30], these books are filled with numbingly predictable criticisms. Taking their cue, the professorial minorities have made their own contributions with articles like “Deconstructing Disney: Chicano/a Children and Critical Race Theory [31]” appearing in journals such as Aztlan. There are also the documentaries [32] and short films, with professors from all over the country humorlessly pontificating about the evils of the company’s heteronormativity and the like.

    Such bold critiques also contain the de rigueur tributes to themselves, as “academics” who would have starved to death in any other society in human history whine and complain about living in a “police state” when normal people roll their eyes upon hearing about the National Socialist sympathies of Cinderella. Our society thus has a never-ending supply of “educated” minorities fresh out of Affirmative Action Studies at Taxpayer Funded University ready to make a living complaining about how Pocahontas is the reason why no one on the reservation can get a job.

    This inevitably trickles down into popular culture, as it is understood that any portrayal of wholesome or “innocent” entertainment contains anti-Semitism. Hence, the staggeringly vulgar Drawn Together portrayed the “Disney Princess [33]” character Clara [34], as racist, classist, and fanatically anti-Semitic. While Drawn Together also took shots at “Jew producers” (allowed because it was produced by, well, Jews) and nonexistent black fathers [35], it shows how deeply it is understood that traditional children’s stories represent the trifecta of racism, anti-Semitism, and “antiquated” gender roles. And of course, we also have Family Guy‘s portrayal of the Disney Universe —

    http://youtu.be/a-snfaG2JH8 [36]

    As always, our cultural watchmen are more paranoid and hysterical than even the most alarmist Fox News contributor. The same Huffington Post contributors chortling at the idea of “Communist Muppets” will dutifully troop off to their media studies class to learn about how Snow White actually paved the way for Auschwitz.

    Of course, these tenured neurotics do have a point, albeit not in the way they think. The kind of traditional world generally presented in Disney movies and fairy tales that rewards (and reinforces) nobility, feminine virtue, and courage, is a product of the white West. Although there have been attempts at pushing a kind of “alternative” children’s literature where the highest values are tolerance and non-discrimination, children and even otherwise goodthinking [37] politically correct adults still respond to the simple stories and values of the European past.

    The problem is that just as the contemporary American government does all it can to destroy the vital source of the real America, the contemporary Disney Corporation is similarly cannibalizing itself. At best, Disney today stands for a spiritually empty consumerism. At worst, it is something truly sinister, deliberately poisoning young people for profit. Nonetheless, in the end, the castle at the Magic Kingdom still stirs a child’s heart, just as it gives anti-racists deep misgivings for reasons they know but will not articulate (namely that they are not anti-racist, but merely anti-white–and anti everything that connotes whiteness).

    It may seem absurd to worry about Kermit the Frog as a closet Marxist, but it is far more ludicrous that we live in a society that pays people vast sums to write about The Little Mermaid as a fascist. Unfortunately, there is always some truth to such charges. The personal is political, and culture is always a battlefield. Disney profits by giving Americans a dull echo of values and archetypes deep within the Western soul. Academics and subsidized activists derive a comfortable living deconstructing this appeal and telling whites they should feel guilty about it.

    It remains to contemporary Radical Traditionalists to re-articulate these truths in new forms that can speak to our people, both freeing them from their guilt and giving our children new stories, legends, and heroes that can’t be repackaged and consumed for the well-being of Michael Eisner. Characters are products, but the stories and themes are inseparable from our life as a people. It’s time we reclaim them.

     

    ...
    (Review Source)

The Federalist Staff1
The Federalist



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Paramount Knew Four Months Ago That 'Monster Trucks' Will Bomb
    (”Ice Age” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The press release, by itself, would not normally elicit a big reaction from the entertainment press. Viacom made the announcement for investors of a revised earnings-per-share amount, lowering previous projections. In a beautiful corporate euphemism, the company attributed the lowered stock payout to “a programming impairment charge.” Investors saw the company incurring a write-down loss totaling $115 million from “the expected performance of an unreleased film.” The entertainment conglomerate, owner of Paramount Pictures, was absorbing a loss for the family-oriented title “Monster Trucks.” While certainly a stark figure, it is not uncommon for a studio to report revenue losses when one of its titles fails to go blockbuster. What was different about this fiscal declaration was the timing and the particular film. The announcement focused on a movie that opens on January 13, and came four months before the movie’s release date. Box office disasters are an infrequent but accepted reality in Dreamland, and it is not uncommon to see entertainment producers licking their fungible wounds. A studio often resorts to a stoic marketing effort for a sub-quality product, hoping to recoup some of the expenses. Other times they cut their losses. Rather than spend more on advertising and distribution, the studio will dispatch a title to the rental market. To behold a Hollywood major conceding defeat in this manner is indeed a rarity. The Promise of Disappointment Each year movie fans with affection for bad cinema note on the calendar the dates of releases that suggest a sublime viewing experience. Of the hundreds of titles Hollywood releases annually there are sure to be a handful that can deliver unintentional laughs. These may vary, depending on individual preferences and taste, of course—one’s garbage could always be another’s mirth. Yet every so often a blatant misfire looms that appears obvious to all. It becomes an unavoidable event. In a way these films resemble one of those crass roadside attractions available once your car drives onto an off-ramp. Everyone just knows. This is evidenced by a conversation I had with writer Paul Young, from ScreenRant: ME: So, “Monster Trucks” is coming. PAUL: Oh, yeah, that’s been on my radar. ME: I’ll be seeing it opening night! PAUL: I have notifications set when advanced tickets on sale! ME: I’m looking for it in 3D! PAUL: Hope it’s at IMAX! This is not a case of critics unfairly lobbying for a movie to fail. The plot line—a sea monster that is adept with tools and resides inside a pickup truck—would be enough to earn vitriol, but the story behind making the film set the expectations. Now the studio is admitting it has a cashflow bonfire on its hands. The effort behind this in-the-ditch release began in 2013. It was announced Paramount Animation intended to launch a new family film franchise, ushered in by then-president Adam Goodman. The director of “Ice Age,” Chris Wedge, was given the reins. Established script writers Jonathon Abel and Glenn Berger (who teamed for “The SpongeBob Movie” and the “Kung Fu Panda” franchise) were hired to formulate the story into a screenplay. Along with bringing in proven talent, the studio granted a healthy budget for the production. At issue, however, was the “concept.” The story derived not from a proven source material, nor the fertile trove of an imaginative writer; it came from a preschooler. Paramount was hurling a fortune in cash at a concept Goodman’s four-year-old son had hatched. What could go wrong? An answer: One hundred million things. Shooting took place in various parts of Canada in spring 2014, and at one point additional writers were brought in to rework aspects of the script. Copious CGI work was needed in post-production to animate the monsters and vehicle effects. The movie was prepped for a May 2015 release, as Paramount plotted a summer blockbuster to launch the franchise. Then signs began to arrive the movie was being wheeled into the motor pool. The studio announced they were shifting its debut to Christmas. This indicated that it needed work, but Paramount was still hoping it had a potential family hit. Then, near the original release date, Paramount announced another date shift to the lightly competitive schedule in March 2016. Six months later came yet another move, to its present premiere date, indicating the studio had given up. January is the traditional dumping ground for studio misfires. Disaster in the Making The question to ask in assessing how a film with an infantile premise became such a money sump is not “What went wrong?” The proper analysis here involves “How was this allowed to happen?” If an unreleased title is so obviously a failure, how was it not cut off earlier, before losing the equivalent of a third-world nation’s gross domestic product? The largest factor: the conception took place when Paramount was still financially vibrant. 2013 was a flush year for the studio, with nearly $1 billion in receipts. Optimism buoyed hopes of creating a new film franchise with built-in toy and marketing product lines. As shooting began in May 2014 (prepping for summer 2015) Paramount was having an even better time, clearing more than $1 billion by year end. The first sign of trouble was in January 2015, with the move to a Christmas release. The next month saw the departure of Goodwin, one year before his contract expired. His film, dubbed his “priority project for Paramount animation,” was now going through post-production without its executive backer. In May it became clear the studio was struggling with the property, revealed by that second release date change. Next, in August Bob Bacon, lead executive of Paramount Animation, left the company. Rather than seeking a replacement, Paramount eliminated his position. By the Viacom earning report this past September, Paramount also saw interim CEO Tim Dooley leave, as well as the studio’s vice chairman, Robert Moore. “Monster Trucks” was now all but abandoned by the side of the road. The Curse of the Fours Viacom has been a conglomerate with upper management conflict lately, and the parent has also been looking for investors or buyers for its Paramount division. The exodus of big-name board members has been connected partially to sale rumors. Another factor: the drop in film revenues. Despite those flush years Paramount was facing a rough economic road ahead. With the exception of “Transformers,” the company had few franchises with sustainable momentum. The 2015 film slate delivered about half of the previous year’s box office revenues. This year delivered a diminished “Star Trek” entry, a flagging “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” sequel, and the outright bomb in the remake of “Ben Hur.” Adding in the projected loss from “Monster Trucks,” Paramount stands to lose $500 million in fiscal 2016. The result of a flawed concept, executive flight, and unknown studio prospects snowballed this film’s production mess. Once the budget was allocated and the production underway, “Monster Trucks” lost its driving force in Goodman. Dissolving the animation division then saw the title towed to backlot calendar dates as new executives grappled with how to handle the older-model lemon of a movie. That four-year-old’s inspiration seemed to set a curse. “Monster Trucks” has had four writers, four release dates, seen four major executives leave the studio, and after nearly four years its own studio predicted it will bomb—four months before it arrived in theaters. Paramount would rather forget it ever existed. ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

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