I Am Legend

Not rated yet!
Director
Francis Lawrence
Runtime
1 h 41 min
Release Date
14 December 2007
Genres
Drama, Horror, Action, Thriller, Science Fiction
Overview
Robert Neville is a scientist who was unable to stop the spread of the terrible virus that was incurable and man-made. Immune, Neville is now the last human survivor in what is left of New York City and perhaps the world. For three years, Neville has faithfully sent out daily radio messages, desperate to find any other survivors who might be out there. But he is not alone.
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Kyle Smith5
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Review: "I Am Legend"
    I AM BLOCKBUSTER Kyle Smith review of “I Am Legend” 100 minutes. Rated PG-13 (scary images and violence) 3 stars out of 4 Manhattan, five years from now. The island is overrun by hordes of frighteningly malformed brain-damaged mouth-breathers (though unlike today’s crowds they are not carrying maps and asking directions to Applebee’s). On the plus side of 2012: According to “I Am Legend,” it will then be OK to shoot these people with high-powered rifles. Will Smith stars as the Last Man on Earth in a scary, inventive, exciting and breathless adventure that combines the best elements of “Children of Men,” “Escape from New York” and “The Road Warrior,” but leaves out the worst stuff – such as the story-clogging despair and political allegory in “Children,” a movie that made apocalypse look like kind of a downer. “I Am Legend” is also a re-remake of 1964’s Vincent Price film “The Last Man on Earth” and “The Omega Man,” the 1971 Charlton Heston flick shot in an LA empty of all intelligent life. (Just crack your own joke here.) In a prologue, we learn that in 2009 there will be a cure for cancer. One or two unintended consequences later, a virus as noxious as the Knicks front office hangs in the air while everyone in Manhattan desperately tries to flee. Soldiers stop people at checkpoints in a nightmarish vision of hell that, if you added about 12,000 spaghetti straps and some $350 bottles of vodka, would closely resemble the Meatpacking District on a Friday night. After all of this, Smith’s Lt. Col. Neville, an expert in viruses, weaponry and survival skills who has also found time to memorize large portions of “Shrek,” is alone in the city, immune to the retrovirus. Every day he leaves his Washington Square digs (decorated in a sort of House and Fortress scheme that involves retractable barricades and van Goghs liberated from museums) to forage for supplies with his German shepherd, Sam, racing his Mustang around spectacular vistas of a New York overgrown by weeds and ravaged by flooding. Herds of wildlife run free, and tanks and cars are jammed together in phalanxes of steel. At night, Neville must take cover: That’s when the zombies, or “Night Seekers,” come out to moan more loudly than striking screenwriters – and they’re hungry for more than just residuals. In other words, Neville’s life, though lonely, is also kind of fun. Who wouldn’t enjoy limitless time to bathe his dog, watch every DVD in the video store and hit golf balls off an aircraft carrier in the Hudson River as though acting out the apocalypse according to Kramer? I personally could use six to nine months of post-human void just to catch up on old copies of The New Yorker and contemplate eternal mysteries of human existence, such as why everyone thought “Babel” was so great. C’mon, how can you beat deer hunting on Central Park South from the window of a speeding Mustang, especially when you’ve got an assault rifle and every PETA activist has long since been devoured by carnivores? This movie is going to be bigger than crucifix sales on Judgment Day, and the main lesson Hollywood should learn from it is that if you’re going to show the end of the world, try to look on the bright side. Neville isn’t just wandering around playing kill-or-be-killed with the zombies or, worse, stomping on the allegory pedal so we’ll be sure to walk away thinking someone like Dick Cheney was behind all this. Neville is trying to develop an antidote to the virus, one that could re verse the effects of the disease and turn these ag gressively hos tile semi- human shriek ers into de cent human beings, or at least some thing that screams no more than the average celebrity publicist. He needs to get out and interact with the zombies (and even zombie rats), injecting them with compounds derived from his own immune blood. Which certainly ensures he gets plenty of exercise: The zombies are clever enough to imitate his own methods for capturing them, and if he lingers outdoors for one second past dusk, they’ll be on him like telemarketers at dinner time. The allegory that does come into play, meanwhile, is so unexpected for this era that it’s refreshing (although 50 years ago the same idea would have been cliché). “I Am Legend” says that when it comes to seeking scientific solutions for the world’s self-inflicted miseries, it wouldn’t hurt to ask God for a clue.]]>
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    (Review Source)
  • "I Am Legend" and God Is Pretty Cool Too
    Will Smith’s sci-fi flick “I Am Legend,” the “Omega Man” and “Last Man on Earth” retread that will likely rule the holiday box office, is a rare Hollywood movie in that it contains a pro-God message in the midst of a scientific inquiry into the nature of the cure for a supervirus. Huh? More here. I won’t give away the ending, but if you’d rather not know anything about the movie, don’t follow the link. ]]>
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    (Review Source)
  • Ten Best-Ever Zombie Movies
    (”I Am Legend” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Yes, the original “Dawn of the Dead” deserves to be there, but c’mon — “Zombieland,” at no. 3, should not be ahead of “Shaun of the Dead,” at no. 5. Also: Is “I Am Legend” a zombie movie? I think it is, and it deserves to be right up there. (Some would argue that fast-moving zombies are not zombies by definition. I say slow-moving zombies should take a simple hint, and do more cardio. By the way, the scenes of Will Smith on the treadmill in “I Am Legend” kind of indicate that he knew about cardio long before Jesse Eisenberg told us about it in “Zombieland.”)]]>
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    (Review Source)
  • Holiday Movie Spectacular!
    (”I Am Legend” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    What’s worth seeing this season? Roughly in order of preference, with links to my reviews: MUST SEE: 1. The Diving Bell and the Butterfly. (Sorry, haven’t written up a review yet. It’s in selected cities only). 2. There Will Be Blood. 3. Sweeney Todd The Demon Barber of Fleet Street. 4. The Bucket List. 5. I Am Legend. 6. Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story. WORTH SEEING: 1. Atonement. 2. Juno. 3. Charlie Wilson’s War. MUST MISS (the movies, not my attacks, which of course are essential reading): 1. The Golden Compass. 2. National Treasure: Book of Secrets 3. Grace Is Gone 4. Youth Without Youth.]]>
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    (Review Source)
  • "Golden Compass" Heading Flop-by-Flopwest
    (”I Am Legend” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Allow me to be the first to call the Nicole Kidman/Daniel Craig fantasy mess “The Golden Compass” a flop. It opened with $8.8 million last night, less than “Beowulf” managed its first day–and “Beowulf” is also a flop. The latter cost $150 million and will earn less than $100 mil at the domestic box office. “The Golden Compass” cost $180 millon and will be lucky if it hits $80 million domestic. Next week it’s up against “I Am Legend,” which is going to beat it into the ground as “Compass” faces the prospect of extremely poor word of mouth. Question: how long before they stop making Nicole Kidman movies? Look at her art-house film, “Margot at the Wedding,” which, okay, is a niche entry, but even so could wind up grossing less than $2 million. Can anyone be called a star if they can’t even sell $2 million worth of tickets? She’s riding an incredible 11-movie disaster streak (you can’t count the animated “Happy Feet”) and even her “hits”–like “The Hours” and “The Others”–were only mildly successful. Picture a slugger who strikes out 200 times a year and never hits anything longer than a single. How long would such a player get to stay in the league? She has never been the lead in a single movie–not one–that has sold enough tickets to justify the $15 million she reportedly got for “The Invasion,” a movie that grossed only $15 million. The only one of her pictures to top $100 million is “Batman Forever,” in which she got fourth billing, below the title.]]>
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    (Review Source)

PJ Media Staff2
PJ Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • What Zombies Teach Us About Human Nature
    (”I Am Legend” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'World War Z TRAILER 2 (2013) - Brad Pitt Movie HD', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); Last week’s article: Beating Back the Nazi “Sickness”Zombies are all the rage these days. AMC’s The Walking Dead reigns as the top-watched drama on basic cable. Films like Warm Bodies, Zombieland, and I Am Legend stand out among recent entries in an enduring horror subgenre. None other than Brad Pitt will headline this year’s World War Z, which looks to amp up its action well beyond the shuffling flesh-eaters of yesteryear.That’s to say nothing of video games, where the undead continue to suck cash from willing gamers anxious to live out an apocalyptic fantasy. Whether its Resident Evil, Left 4 Dead, or downloadable add-ons to Call of Duty, zombie hoards batter down the doors of our collective consciousness. What exactly makes them so popular?Like the Nazis we considered last week, zombies provide guilt-free slaughter. No one feels bad about shooting something that’s already dead. Plus, because zombies were once living human beings, they provide a cathartic release for that deeply suppressed homicidal impulse none of us wants to admit to harboring.Zombies are amoral. They have no agenda, no emotional motivation, no plan. They simply menace. So putting them down presents no moral dilemma. What would be murder were they living becomes a wholly defensible act of survival. The very nature of a zombie marks it for destruction. Since it has no feelings and endures no torment, the acceptable methods for disposing of a zombie are bound only by the imagination of the killer. So zombies enable creative guilt-free violence on a scale limited only by their numbers.Zombies also serve an adaptive narrative purpose in storytelling. While they more often than not simply lurk around the corner as boogeymen, the nature of a zombie can be tweaked to represent certain themes. In George Romero’s 1968 classic Night of the Living Dead, the film which birthed the modern undead flesh-eater, zombies were implied to be the fulfillment of biblical revelation. Writing for the Washington Post, commentator Christopher Moreman expounds:The zombie apocalypse is often equated with the wrath of God and biblical end times. Though the origins of zombie outbreaks usually remain indeterminate in the genre, most zombie narratives indicate that we brought this upon ourselves. Whether corporations, the government, or the military are to blame, the average person also bears fault for participating in a corrupt system, just as the people of Sodom and Gomorrah were collectively responsible for God’s wrath.Romero’s 1978 Dawn of the Dead took the theme a step further, assigning a decisively anti-capitalist overtone to the narrative. The undead converged upon a shopping mall, retracing the routines of their former lives. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2013/5/9/what-zombies-teach-us-about-human-nature/ previous Page 1 of 4 next   ]]>
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    (Review Source)

The Federalist Staff1
The Federalist



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Why America Is Obsessed With Survivalism
    (”I Am Legend” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lately we’ve become somewhat obsessed with movies, TV shows, books, and video games that envision a post-apocalyptic world. This October, “The Walking Dead” will premier its seventh season on AMC, while its spin-off “Fear the Walking Dead” debuts its second season in April. Although zombie movies have been around for decades, it’s only been in the past 15 years or so that the post-apocalyptic tale has become an important cultural touchstone in America, particularly in imagining what life would look like in the aftermath. What does this fixation on the idea of survival say about our society? And more importantly, what does it say about ourselves and how we interact with our own mortality? The Apocalypse Craze Has Lasted More than a Decade The recent zombie-pocalypse craze began in 2002 with Danny Boyle’s acclaimed “28 Days Later,” a story about a man who wakes up in a London hospital only to find out that a virus has wiped out most of England and perhaps the world. Those infected are like crazed zombies. “World War Z,” a personal favorite, is an adaptation of a novel in which the United Nations tries to find a cure for a zombie virus after all major world cities have fallen to the lightning-fast “zekes.” Video games like “The Last of Us” allow you to enter into these kinds of worlds and try to survive. In all of these stories, something disrupts regular life for everyone on Earth. Zombies aside, countless post-apocalyptic tales have utterly captured our imaginations in recent years. In films, we’ve had major productions like “I Am Legend,” “Children of Men,” the Planet of the Apes series, and last year’s Oscar-nominated “Mad Max: Fury Road.” Young adult fiction features an endless supply of these kind of stories, from the Hunger Games series to “Maze Runner” and “Divergent.” In literature, there was Cormack McCarthy’s harrowing novel “The Road,” which was adapted for film in 2009, and Emily St. John Mandel’s 2014 novel “Station 11,” which features a virus that wipes out much of the world and breaks down society. In all of these stories, something disrupts regular life for everyone on Earth. People are no longer going to their jobs, playing sports, or watching TV. Perhaps most importantly, no one is spending time on computers and smartphones. The Meaning Inside Fighting for Your Life Many of these narratives contrast a main character’s otherwise struggle-free pedestrian Western life with the disaster that is soon to strike. They are thrown suddenly into a chaotic world of roving bands of criminals, zombies, or government agents. They depict man going back to a near state of nature. He must recreate organized society, even if that society is made up of only the few people with whom he has thrown in his lot. They have to start over wherever they are. Water is scarce and must be fought for and protected. The survivors make their own clothes and grow and hunt for their own food. Life is hard but in some ways straightforward. Existence is so easy, especially in the West, that it disconnects us from our humanity in some ways. Here we get down to the kernel of why we are so drawn to these stories. They show people having to fight for their very life. They aren’t checking Twitter or posting a selfie on Instagram. They aren’t picking out their favorite variety of cruciferous leafy greens at Whole Foods. They’re just trying to make it one more day. We, as a society, are utterly out of touch with what it would mean to live every day with only one goal: survive. We work hard, sure, but it’s not the same. Everything is easy. The water just comes out of the pipe. The food is sitting at the grocery store for us to pick up. What’s more, much of our existence is made up of leisure time. So we wonder what it was like when people used to have to work from morning to night just to keep their small household going. What if, like in “The Walking Dead,” my social network shrunk to just the people within a few miles of myself? What would it look like if everything in my life suddenly changed? Somewhere deep down, perhaps we are aware of the superficiality of our day-to-day life, so we crave having to struggle for our survival. It puts us in touch with our own mortality, not by provoking fear and insecurity, but by awakening a desire to touch our human frailty and really feel it. Existence is so easy, especially in the West, that it disconnects us from our humanity in some ways. The numbness of modern existence becomes a burden. On some instinctual level, we want to fight for our life. In Distress, We Drastically Simplify to What Matters These days, we are overwhelmed with media and information and leisure. Surely some part of us wants to go back to basics, without cell phones and social media, gossip and politics. In most of these post-apocalyptic books and movies, technology has broken down completely. The stories appeal to us because they show people returning to the fundamentals of existence, struggling to meet their physical needs and maintain real human relationships—offline. The stories appeal to us because they show people returning to the fundamentals of existence. This phenomenon manifests itself, increasingly, in the survival industry and the more than 3 million real-life “preppers” in America who stockpile food and water, and sometimes guns and ammo. Some even take survivalism courses on how to hunt for food, do basic first aid or get clean drinking water. They aren’t restricted to the militia crowd, and they aren’t wackos out in the woods. They include professional upper-middle-class men and women who want to be ready if disaster strikes. It wouldn’t be fair to say these people are hoping for such a calamity, but some part of them yearns for things to be hard yet simple again. There is a certain excitement in people’s voices when they talk about a possible EMP attack, or when Ebola first appeared in the United States. It’s not sick morbidity or ungratefulness for this prosperous Western life. Nor is it golden-age syndrome. It’s just a desire to put one’s finger on the pulse of life. To know and acknowledge our mortality in a society that constantly tries to shield us from it. So we watch “The Martian” or “Revolution,” or play “The Last of Us.” We stockpile water and ravioli (high in protein and vitamin C to fight scurvy). And we imagine what it would be like to fight to stay alive. ]]>
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    (Review Source)

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