Home

Not rated yet!
Director
Tim Johnson
Runtime
1 h 34 min
Release Date
18 March 2015
Genres
Fantasy, Comedy, Animation, Science Fiction, Family
Overview
When Earth is taken over by the overly-confident Boov, an alien race in search of a new place to call home, all humans are promptly relocated, while all Boov get busy reorganizing the planet. But when one resourceful girl, Tip, manages to avoid capture, she finds herself the accidental accomplice of a banished Boov named Oh. The two fugitives realize there’s a lot more at stake than intergalactic relations as they embark on the road trip of a lifetime.
Staff ReviewsAround the Web ReviewsAudience Reviews

Check back soon when the reviews are out!

Or why not join our mailing list to stay up to date?

 

SIGN UP!

Box office recaps sent twice a month (maximum).

( ̄^ ̄)ゞ (☞゚ヮ゚)☞ No spam! ☜(゚ヮ゚☜)




 ✍🏻  > 🗡️   Want to join our team? Email us!  
Plugged In7
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Plugged In Movie Review: Home
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Home
    AnimationKidsComedySci-Fi/Fantasy We hope this review was both interesting and useful. Please share it with family and friends who would benefit from it as well.Movie ReviewWhat makes someplace a home? From the perspective of the little six-legged space aliens called the Boov, that's a difficult question to answer. They seem to be eternally on the run—from planet to planet and solar system to solar system—in constant dread of their mortal enemy, the Gorg. So, finding a place to settle down isn't easy. As their beloved leader, Captain Smek, is so fond of saying, "It's never too late … to run away." The one thing that these squishy multicolored minions have in their favor, however, is some pretty cool, high-powered, planet-clearing technology. If they do happen to come upon a potential new home world while zipping to and fro, why, they can clear it out in a New Boov Minute. Take this planet they just discovered called "Earth." It's something of a fixer-upper, but it'll work. All they have to do is levitate and relocate the backward and simple creatures that currently populate the place: bipedal thingamajigs called "humans." And just to show you how benevolent and thoughtful the Boov are, they even build these strange savages a new place to live. It's a community filled with merry-go-rounds and free cotton candy. They call it Happy Human Town. Granted, packing 7 billion sweaty natives into what used to be Australia is kind of tight but, hey, the Boov'll throw in free ice cream, too. Uh-oh. There's one lone human who escaped the relocation effort. She's a rebellious teen named Gratuity Tucci (Tip for short). Like the Boov, she's starting to wonder about the meaning of home, too. Squirreled away in her apartment building while the aliens were clearing out the city, she got passed over. The comforts of home are all around her, but with her mom gone, home just isn't home anymore. Even as she prepares to set out in search of her mom, though, Tip isn't quite sure how to proceed. And then she stumbles upon a particular Boov who just might help. He's something of an outcast misfit, just like her. He's known as Oh, because whenever he stumbles and bumbles his way onto the scene, the other Boov can't help but groan, "Ohhhh." So Oh's on the run, just like Tip. He made the biggest mistake of his life recently, accidently sending out an Evite for his house-warming party—to the entire universe. Gulp. If the Gorg decide to RSVP, well, raising the roof might take on a whole new meaning. But all is not lost quite yet. Perhaps together this unlikely duo might be able to set things right. If they can learn to help each other and maybe even like each other, then they have a shot.Positive ElementsThe little Boov Oh is pretty typical of his kind, putting survival over everything else—including relationships and commitments. In fact, Oh makes mention of the Boov's core belief that if the probability of an endeavor's success is less than 50%, one should always give up. But through Tip's consistent sacrifice and loyalty he comes to understand that living up to your promises is essential, and that taking chances to help those you care about—even when the odds are against you—is often necessary. Oh also realizes that Captain Smek's low assessment of mankind was a lie. "Humans are not simple and backward," he reports as he apologizes to Tip for his past choices. We find out that the Boov are hatched and don't have families. "No wonder you take things and don't care about others," Tip reasons. She makes it very clear that "you don't leave family!" And another character's dogged determination points to the value of family as well.Spiritual ContentSexual ContentWhen a Boov stumbles into Tip's homemade trap, he's hit with dirty laundry, makeup and glitter—leaving him covered in pink and wearing a sparkly bra on his head.Violent ContentCaptain Smek threatens to have Oh "erased." Gorg ships fire at Oh and Tip and some terrorized Boov. And the baddies begin to crumble our planet's surface with gigantic earthmovers. Oh steps forward and it looks like he gets squashed by one of those machines. (He doesn't really.) In the course of running from pursuers, Oh and Tip cause all manner of slapstick destruction, including smashing vehicles and buildings. Smek regularly bonks Oh and others on the head with his staff that he calls the "shusher."Crude or Profane LanguageName-calling includes Tip labeling Oh a "lying fart face."Drug and Alcohol ContentNone.Other Negative ElementsPotty humor gags range from levitated commodes to Oh biting into a blue urinal tablet (offscreen), brushing his teeth with a toilet brush and musing about the difference between "going" number one, number two or number three. Tip and Oh talk about taking a "pee break" while traveling and about Oh's "Boov butt." Captain Smek steals something valuable from the Gorg. Oh lies on a number of occasions—moments that are very clear to Tip and the audience because the Boov turn green when they fib.ConclusionEarly on, the Boov blunderer Oh accurately describes his fellows as the "best species ever ... at running away." So it would make sense, then, that families should start running away from this animated alien flick, right? Well, maybe not so fast. Sure, the movie's a tad derivative. It's packed with enough toilet bowl giggles to make even an 8-year-old boy roll his eyes. And if you find actor Jim Parson's TV role on The Big Bang Theory just the least bit irritating, you're gonna quickly tire of his little English-mangling alien guy here. But Home has its bubble-eyed sweet side. In the midst of fast-paced antics and pratfalls, tykes will find some solid encouragement to look beneath the surface and seek out the heart and unique qualities of the "misfits" around them. They'll also find themselves thinking that sometimes a little extra bravery is required if you want to do right by those you love. And if Mom or Dad want to bring it up, there's even a subtle statement here about the potentially isolating nature of social media—especially when compared to the joy of really plugging in with family and friends.Pro-social ContentObjectionable ContentSummary AdvisoryPlot SummaryChristian BeliefsOther Belief SystemsAuthority RolesProfanity/ViolenceKissing/Sex/HomosexualityDiscussion TopicsAdditional Comments/NotesEpisode Reviews]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • 'Home' is Where the Money Is
    All right now, click your heels together and repeat after me: There’s no movie like Home. There’s no movie like Home. There’s no movie like … Home, DreamWorks’ newest animated alien lark, parked its bubble-like spaceship right at the top of the box office. Sure, maybe the flick didn’t earn enough to buy a big chunk of Australia (yet), but it did collect an estimated $54 million, which is enough for a nice two bedroom condo in San Francisco. (As long as you’re not too picky about the neighborhood, of course.) Home blunted the impact of Get Hard, an R-rated prison-predicated comedy starring Will Ferrell and Kevin Hart. But while Get Hard didn’t get No. 1, it did collect $34.6 million in hard cash, which might be enough to get Will Ferrell sent to jail again. Two former box office champs finished third and fourth this week. The Divergent Series: Insurgent, last week’s title holder, lost nearly 60% of its audience and tumbled to third with a $22.1 million take. And Cinderella, while still twirling away at the ball, is beginning to watch the clock. The Disney princess earned another $17.5 million for fourth. That brings its three-week total to a dreamy $150 million, just about $15 mil away from 2015’s earnings leader, Fifty Shades of Grey. It Follows was as good as its name, following the big four with a $4 million weekend of its own and a fifth-place finish. Given its makers only spent $2 million to make the thing and spent maybe $4.99 on marketing, I suspect that a sequel or two might … follow. Final figures update: 1. Home, $52.1 million; 2. Get Hard, $33.8 million; 3. The Divergent Series: Insurgent, $21.5 million; 4. Cinderella, $17 million; 5. It Follows, $3.8 million. ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Crosswalk2
Cross Walk



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Colorful Characters Prove There's No Place Like HOME
    Movies DVD Release Date: July 28, 2015Theatrical Release Date: March 27, 2015Rating: PG (for mild action and some rude humor)Genre: Animation/Adventure/ComedyRun Time: 94 minutesDirector: Tim JohnsonCast: Jim Parsons, Rihanna, Steve Martin, Matt Jones, Jennifer Lopez We always knew someday the aliens would come... but no one expected them to be quite like this. Welcome to what director Tim Johnson (Over the Hedge) calls the first "post-apocalyptic, alien invasion buddy comedy, road trip, animated movie." Otherwise known as the latest Dreamworks release, HOME. Our story opens on "Moving Day" when the alien Boov take up residence on planet Earth. Not to worry, all the humans have been transplanted to new homes on a previously uninhabited part of the planet, along with everything the Boov believe humans need to make them happy. All, that is, except Tip (Rihanna, Battleship). She got left behind when her mom (Jennifer Lopez, Parker) was swept away, so Tip and her cat named Pig have no choice but to set out alone to find her. Making her animated feature debut, Rihanna hits all the right notes as scared-but-sassy Tip. "I understand the way Tip thinks," the singer says, "as well as her flaws, ambition, sass and attitude." It shows in her voice; we hear both grit and giggles in Tip's journey. They travelers are not alone for long. After car trouble leaves them stranded at an abandoned convenience store, Tip and Pig reluctantly join forces with Oh (Jim Parsons) one of the Boov who is on the run for reasons of his own (let's just say he had a little trouble with the difference between "send" and "send all" ...a dilemma most adults in the audience can appreciate). Oh is not your ordinary Boov. He's prone to making "unintentionally hilarious" mistakes and got his name from his "many friends" as the sight of him invariably prompted despairing sighs of "Oh…" Parsons was the obvious choice to voice Oh, since the earnest alien shares several qualities with Sheldon, Parsons' Big Bang Theory character. He voices Oh with utter sincerity while skillfully navigating the entertaining Boovian version of the English language created by The True Meaning of Smekday author Adam Rex.SEE ALSO: Escape from Planet Earth is Surprisingly Entertaining googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-1'); }); Much like Emmet from The Lego Movie, Oh has a relentlessly positive attitude. He enjoys life and wants the other Boov to, too—but they're more interested in running away and keeping to themselves. Running away is a highly prized character trait among Boov; their far-from-fearless leader Captain Smek (Steve Martin, The Pink Panther 2) claims it's the only way their people can avoid annihilation by their relentless enemy, the Gorg. Back at the convenience store, Oh "repairs" Tip's car with assorted supplies resulting in a fabulous vehicle powered by slushies and equipped with a variety of food-based defense systems. It's an ongoing gag that manages to stay funny throughout the story. While Oh is a naïve but highly intelligent alien, and Tip is a smart teen with pluck to spare, Pig the cat is just that: a cat. He's almost always in the middle of the action but mostly sleeps through it, often on top of Oh's head. What with aliens, gravity control, and flying cars around, having a normal pet doing everyday cat things in the midst of the craziness is the sprinkle on this cupcake of a story. As Oh and Tip continue their quest, Oh finds himself on his own journey of self-discovery. His whole worldview turns upside down as he comes to realize many things he took for granted about himself, his people, and others just aren't true. There are some nice teachable moments to bring up with the kids at home, such as when characters act one way because they're feeling another.SEE ALSO: Action-Packed "Monsters Vs. Aliens" Offers Plenty of Laughs HOME is a delightful movie. No, it's not groundbreaking or amazing or the greatest movie since ever—but it is charming and sweet and has genuinely funny moments. It's rated PG for mild action and some rude humor but as "rude humor" goes it was pretty polite; even the bathroom humor was more amusing than gross. All the adults and children in my group enjoyed it. P.S. There's no need to stay through the end of the credits unless you just like to read the names of the multitudes involved in making the picture; there's nothing on the screen at the end other than the Twentieth Century Fox logo. CAUTIONS (may contain spoilers): googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-2'); }); if (gptClientWidth >= 992 && gptClientWidth <= 1000000) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-3'); }); Drugs/Alcohol: Drinks are served at a couple of parties, but Boov don’t consume human food and it didn’t appear the humans were drinking alcohol. Captain Smek tends to eat random things with somewhat explosive results, but they’re not necessarily shown as an addiction. Language/Profanity: A few references to digestive functions including commentary that Boov have a third variation of output in addition to humans’ numbers one and two; the travelers stop for a pee break. Sex/Nudity: None Violent/Frightening/Intense: Captain Smek tends to bop people with his “shoosher” and there is a fair amount of cartoon-variety violence, often involving concession stand-type food. It does get a little tense at the climax when a character appears to be in danger of being crushed to death. *Published 3/27/2015SEE ALSO: Dreamworks' Megamind a Familiar but Funny Trip ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • 5 Things Parents Should Know about Men in Black: International
    (”Home” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Ever since she was young, Molly has wanted to be a Men in Black agent.  She’s wanted to capture bad aliens, maintain world peace and – of course – wear those hip-looking black sunglasses.  
    ...
    (Review Source)

Christian Toto1
Hollywood In Toto



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • ‘Annabelle Comes Home’ Lacks Blood, Gore and Scares
    (”Home” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    annabelle comes home review

    When did the “Annabelle” franchise morph into “Paranormal Activity?”

    The former is now content to make us stare at the screen until something that isn’t supposed to move moves.

    That’s

    The post ‘Annabelle Comes Home’ Lacks Blood, Gore and Scares appeared first on Hollywood in Toto.

    ...
    (Review Source)

The Federalist Staff1
The Federalist



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Why Disney And Steven Spielberg Will Never Work Together Again
    (”Home” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The release of “The BFG” has many people (mostly marketers) excited at the collaboration between director Steven Spielberg and Disney Studios. Two esteemed names in family entertainment are coming together to deliver an adaption of a children’s classic from author Roald Dahl. What seems like a natural partnership has never taken place before, and the economic forces of their industry have basically stipulated it may never happen again. Casual audience members may regard the legendary director and the family studio titan as natural partners. Fact is, it is a strange collaboration when you consider Spielberg has his own studio (DreamWorks) with its own animation division. While Disney has had a longstanding distribution deal with DreamWorks and despite teaming up with Spielberg, it announced last fall that contract will expire this August. That is but one curiosity in the ever-evolving financial backstory involving these two entities. The competition between these “partners” has always been present, and it means that getting the movie completed is no small wonder. The marriage bringing “The BFG” onscreen this Friday will culminate in divorce in just a few months. A Partnership Doomed From the Beginning Spielberg famously created his new studio in 1994 with two other Hollywood figureheads: record and film mogul David Geffen and longtime studio executive Jefferey Katzenberg. Katzenberg had rejuvenated Disney in both animation and live-action titles throughout the 1980s and had just resigned from the company when he teamed with Spielberg, a sign Disney would be ever-present on their young studio’s horizon. DreamWorks, as a fundamental partner with Universal Studios, found enough early success to create its own animated film division (DreamWorks Animation). Following a deal with Paramount, DreamWorks Studio entered into a financing arrangement with Reliance, an investment firm from India. The segregated live-action division entered into a distribution deal with Disney in 2009. That partnership has not been fruitful. While some titles had a measure of success, more common have been notable thuds, such as “Fright Night” or “Need For Speed.” Then there was the execrable scud “Cowboys And Aliens.” Perhaps the House of Mouse developed an antagonistic attitude as a result of these monetary shortfalls. Meanwhile, in 2014 Katzenberg was shopping the DreamWorks Animation side for a buyer. After a Japanese offer fell through, he nearly had deal brokered with Hasbro that November. The toymaker has not only licensed its properties for motion pictures (such as “Transformers,” “G.I. Joe,” and “Battleship”), it has also developed its own production division. The desire to have an animation outlet for its licensed products was obvious and would have been a blessing. Until the Mouse showed up. Just days after announcing the possible merger, Hasbro cut off the negotiations. The reason? Disney executives approached the toy producer in opposition, lest it be considered a competitor. Hasbro suits crunched the numbers: the company had not only generous arrangements involving Marvel and Star Wars characters, but a new contract set to cover the lucrative Disney Princess ensemble. Walking away from DreamWorks was sound, given these Disney deals amount to one-third of Hasbro’s business. But don’t cry for Jefferey and Steven. Two weeks ago, regulators approved the purchase of their division by Universal’s parent company, Comcast. By combining DWA with Comcast’s Illumination Entertainment (makers of “The Minions”), the communication giant aims to become competitive with Disney in animation. That would explain the valuation of the purchase price—Comcast dropped $3.9 billion on the studio. Does that sound like it overpaid? Indeed. For perspective, when Disney purchased the more dependable Star Wars franchise, the price tag was $4 billion. Not only is DreamWorks of lower value, Comcast is buying a DreamWorks Animation unit with just a many problems as diamonds in the vault. So Much for That Promise “Entertainment is one of the bright spots of our economy,” said President Obama from the parking lot of the DreamWorks Animation campus in November 2013. “The gap between what we can do and what other countries can do is enormous. That’s worth cheering for.” This was not the first time Obama could be accused of being tone-deaf to economic realities. That day the president was visiting Katzenberg, one of his biggest campaign contributors, and taking a tour of the facilities. Considering Katzenberg had helped raise nearly half a million in cash for his elections, you can see why Obama would lavish praise on the man and his company. You cannot see how he was accurate, however. Just weeks following the upbeat speech, hundreds of DreamWorks employees drove off that same parking lot for the last time, laid off by the studio. Katzenberg also made a startling announcement soon after: he would close the nearby PDI studio, a longstanding animation office complex DWA took over in the 1990s. There was an even starker reality behind these moves. Obama had campaigned in 2012 on policies of preserving American jobs, and castigated opponent Mitt Romney for supposedly “outsourcing” work to other nations. After Obama’s upbeat speech, Katzenberg was slashing workers and closing offices in the United States, but not abroad. Opposite to claims from the man he financially backed for high office, DWA scaled back its release schedule and began farming out more animation work on future films to divisions in Canada and Asia. Comcast bought into a company truncating its releases and sitting on successes tied to tired franchises. Following those layoffs, the studio saw losses from it release “Mr. Peabody and Sherman,” the third title of its last four releases to lead to a write-down in stock reports. Those fortunes have recently improved, with “Home” and “Kung Fu Panda 3” becoming money makers, but those were released one full year apart. If Comcast expects to use a depleted DreamWorks to compete with Disney, it is a very long-range plan. It would take years just to get the DWA release schedule back to a more active level. In the meantime, Disney is in such a good position it may not even be regarding Spielberg’s “The BFG” as a lynchpin for its release calendar. Disney recently shattered the record for the fastest-ever to earn $1 billion at the box office in a year. More impressively, that feat took place a full five weeks before “Finding Dory” had been released to record-breaking numbers. ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Want even more consensus?

Skip Rotten Tomatoes, they’re biased SJWs too afraid to criticize things like the Ghost Busters reboot. Avoid giving them ad revenue by using the minimalist alternative, Cinesift, for a quick aggregate:

 🗣️ Know of another conservative review that we’re missing?
Leave a link in the comments below or email us!  

What’d you think? Let us know with a video:

Record a webcam review!

Or anonymous text review:

Submit your review
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
1
2
3
4
5
Submit
     
Cancel

Create your own review

Average rating:  
 0 reviews
Overall Hollywood Bs Average rating:  
 
Anti-patriotism Average rating:  
 
Misandry Average rating:  
 
Affirmative action Average rating:  
 
LGBTQ rstuvwxyz Average rating:  
 
Anti-God Average rating:  
 

Buy on Amazon:
⚠️  Comment freely, but please respect our young users.
👍🏻 Non PC comments/memes/vids/links 
👎🏻  Curse words / NSFW media / JQ stuff
👌🏻 Visit our 18+  free speech forum to avoid censorship.
⚠️ Keep your kids’ websurfing safe! Read this.

Share this page:

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail