Get on Up

Not rated yet!
Director
Tate Taylor
Runtime
2 h 19 min
Release Date
1 August 2014
Genres
Drama, Music
Overview
A chronicle of James Brown's rise from extreme poverty to become one of the most influential musicians in history.
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John Hanlon2
John Hanlon Reviews



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Get on Up
    In 42, unhealthy Chadwick Boseman exhibited a quiet resilience as iconic baseball player Jackie Robinson. That admirable film chronicled that player’s unlikely rise in a solid and straightforward way. Get on Up, side effects directed by Tate...
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    (Review Source)
  • The Movies of 2014
    (”Get on Up” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The end of 2014 is quickly approaching. With that in mind, page I went back and created a list of all of the films that I reviewed this year and the different ratings I gave them. Of course, this this isn’t a complete list of all of the films I saw this year. It’s...
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    (Review Source)

Plugged In1
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Get on Up
    DramaMusical We hope this review was both interesting and useful. Please share it with family and friends who would benefit from it as well.Movie Review"James Brown. James Brown. James Brown." From early on, James Joseph Brown Jr. would bolster himself with that mantra. It was a sort of reminder of who he was. Especially since it always seemed that life was trying to snuff him out, beating on him with a big hard-knuckled fist. When he was a boy he was shuffled from a one-roomed deep-woods shack to sharing a backroom bed in his Aunt Honey's house of ill repute to landing in a barren jail cell for petty theft. But all along the way, he never let his surroundings strip him of who he was. He'd just keep repeating, "James Brown. James Brown. James Brown." And it would keep him going somehow. There was only one other thing that would lift young James back to his feet when he was slammed on his face in the dust: music. Music and James Brown just seemed to go together like breathing and life. You couldn't have one without the other. So when James wasn't singing on a street corner to draw johns into his aunt's web of prostitution, he was singing and dancing at the local Pentecostal church. And with time, an interesting and almost inevitable thing began to happen. Music and the chanted name James Brown didn't just lift up a battered kid from Barnwell, South Carolina, anymore: In combination those two special things started lifting up everybody, everywhere. You better get back, now, 'cause bring James Brown and his new brand of funky music into a room, and people couldn't keep their feet from tappin'. They couldn't stop their bodies from dancin'. They couldn't help but call out, "James Brown! James Brown! James Brown!"Positive ElementsThe film points out that James Brown indeed had a lasting impact on his generation and modern pop music. And that he was also something of a social activist. After Martin Luther King Jr. was murdered, Brown held a televised concert that was credited with quelling potential riots. He recorded songs promoting black pride and encouraging African-American kids to stay in school through a heavy drop-out period in the 1960s. Although the now regularly touring Brown was never one to stay at home and raise a family, the film does show (at least momentary) signs of his love for his kids. And even though he rejects his mother's renewed overtures of friendship—years after she abandoned him as a child—James arranges to have the woman's financial needs met. He fines bandmates who swear or take drugs. Part of Brown's repeated mantra is an assurance that he doesn't need anyone other than himself. But he eventually comes to realize that the relationships and love of good friends is vital.Spiritual ContentAs a boy, young James Brown wanders into a Pentecostal church and is mesmerized by a preacher in a white suit who dances and hollers out "hallelujahs" from the stage. "Let the holy ghost hit ya!" the man screams. (That spiritual bombast eventually inspires some of Brown's own theatrics in his concerts.) A gospel band sings the song "Mary Don't You Weep." And when a member of that group asks his mother to help Brown, he reminds her of her favorite saying: "Sinners stand in mercy's way." A few years later, Brown has an after-performance conversation with a young Lil' Richard, and the two talk of the devil's temptations.Sexual ContentA topless prostitute leans out of an upstairs window, her arms strategically placed to cover most but not all of her breasts. Men at a brothel kiss and caress scantily clad women. A good friend named Bobby walks in on his sister having sex with James Brown. The two are going at it up against her dresser (while mostly clothed). "Men gonna lay with women, that's nature," Brown tells Bobby. "But a woman ain't gonna stop a man from his purpose." In the course of the movie's decade-hopping narrative, we're introduced to two of Brown's four wives and several of his children, but the details of his many reported sexual affairs are mostly glossed over and/or ignored. Occasional vague comments by bandmates, and scenes featuring female admirers, merely suggest that his trysts were a regular occurrence. We see women mobbing him, grasping at him and swarming around him as he steps off the stage. Lil' Richard gives James Brown a number of steamy come-hither looks as the two talk casually about their future singing careers. Brown's father and mother go from being on the verge of a physical fight to embracing and smothering each other with lustful kisses. The man picks up his wife and carries her to the bed. Later, Brown spots his mother, now a prostitute, hanging all over another man. James Brown's female dancers regularly wear miniskirts and other formfitting outfits onstage. Women around a pool wear revealing swimsuits. A neighbor (and the camera) ogles Brown's wife DeeDee's ample cleavage as she bends over at a Christmas party …Recommended ResourceA Chicken's Guide to Talking Turkey With Your Kids About SexKevin LemanEven the bravest parents feel timid about discussing sex with their 8- to 14-year-olds! This resource offers reassuring, humorous, real-life anecdotes along with reliable information to help you with this challenging task.Buy NowViolent ContentBrown notices this attention and later beats his wife to the ground for "flaunting herself" that way. This is the only violent treatment of any of his wives that we see, but it's implied he's become a regular abuser. And that pattern of ugly mistreatment of woman has apparently been picked up from his father. Early on in James' life, his dad slaps his mother around and even shoots at a tree branch near her head. The man also slings young James around, slapping him across the face. A young James is pulled into a "contest" where a group of black children are blindfolded and given oversized boxing gloves to pummel one another with. The boys are sent, one by one, crashing to the mat after getting hit in the face and stomach. (The whole affair is designed to entertain white revelers.) Much later, Brown starts a prison brawl by punching a fellow inmate in the face. A drugged-up Brown walks into a lecture hall swinging a shotgun. He accidentally shoots the weapon into the ceiling, causing quite a ruckus and panic. He runs away from the arriving police, triggering a blockade-smashing car chase that only ends when the cops shoot out his windshield and tires.Crude or Profane LanguageA couple of f-words and a half-dozen s-words join multiple uses of "d--n," "h---" and "a--." God's and Jesus' names are each misused once or twice. The n-word is spit out on four or five occasions.Drug and Alcohol ContentBrown laces a marijuana joint he's rolling with a crystalline drug (likely PCP). We don't see him smoke this juiced-up joint, but it's apparent that he has. As a boy, James lures prospective "clients" to his aunt's brothel with calls of "Pretty girls! Whiskey!" And indeed we see the johns (some of them soldiers) holding glasses of booze as they talk to and caress the young women there. Partiers drink beer and hard liquor, as does a group in a crowded dance hall. Brown's elderly mother swills champagne. Bandmates and other hangers-on guzzle alcohol in several scenes. Bobby is a chain-smoker. Brown and a number of others light up from time to time as well.Other Negative ElementsAs a teen, James breaks into a car to steal a suit. And the man sometimes accepts opportunities or makes hasty changes on a whim that leave friends and bandmates feeling betrayed. He also attempts to cheat on his taxes.ConclusionKnown almost as much for his slippery-foot dance moves and bouncing acrobatics as for his full-throated vocals, James Brown was an iconic trendsetter in 20th-century popular music. Get on Up makes that fact abundantly clear. The film tells the singer's story in a series of back-and-forth, decades-leaping flashbacks as it giddily performs its way through his musical repertoire. The real-world, well-documented nastier side to James Brown's persona is a bit sugarcoated here. His womanizing, wife-beating and eventual heavy drug use seem to get quickly brushed aside in favor of a few more groovy tunes and cool rock star shenanigans. But is it too quickly dismissed? Or not quickly enough? That depends on your perspective and what you're looking for in a biopic, because moviegoers still witness some grunting sexuality, misogynistic manhandlings and moments of drug-connected bad behavior. And that makes this something of a mixed musical bag. James Brown fans will certainly enjoy the performances and appreciate an inside look at what created the "hardest working man in show business." But they won't necessarily leave the theater singing "I Feel Good."Pro-social ContentObjectionable ContentSummary AdvisoryPlot SummaryChristian BeliefsOther Belief SystemsAuthority RolesProfanity/ViolenceKissing/Sex/HomosexualityDiscussion TopicsAdditional Comments/NotesEpisode Reviews]]>
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Debbie Schlussel1
The New York Post



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Wknd Box Office: Guardians of the Galaxy, Get On Up, Magic in the Moonlight, Boyhood, Third Person
    Blog Posts Movie Reviews Third Person“: The feel-good incest movie of the year, complete with scenes of a character (Olivia Wilde) having sex with her father. Paul Haggis brings you quality cinema! This is yet another one of the long, boring, “interlocking plots” movies brought to you by Director Haggis. This one is long, boring, and depressing throughout. And pointless. An ensemble cast of stars, including Mila Kunis, James Franco, Liam Neeson, Wilde, Adrien Brody, and Kim Basinger, are in interlocking stories about heartbreak and loss, all of ’em sad, depressing, and worse. And they are supposed to take place in Paris, Rome, and New York, though the Paris and New York stories seem to take place in the same city, as the hotel maid who lives in New York cleans in the Paris hotel. Yes, it’s supposed to be that way because in the end, all of these pointless stories are supposed to be the same story . . . or something. I didn’t care, and if you waste your time and money at this bore, you won’t either. This was so stupid and so overwrought with hyperbolic melodrama, it was enough for a lifetime of soap operas (and a lot more boring). The stories: Neeson is a washed up author who left his wife Basinger for his mistress Wilde, who is also having an affair with her father. Neeson is trying to finish his next “big” novel and Wilde is a fashion writer who also wants to become a successful fiction writer. Kunis is a former soap opera star who now has no money and is a hotel maid. She’s fighting to see her son with Franco, a rich and famous artist, after she allegedly hurt her child. And she is struggling to make a meeting with her lawyer and a social worker to get to see her son. Brody is a mysterious American businessman in Rome who rips off men’s fashion designs. He meets a Roma woman in a bar who has “lost” a large amount of money she’s saved up to buy her daughter back from some slave trade thugs. He tries to help her but soon wonders if he’s a patsy in a con. Again, who cares? So what? Save your time and money and skip this. FOUR MARXES PLUS FOUR BIN LADENS PLUS FOUR OBAMAS ]]>
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Armond White2
The National Review / OUT



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Famous Flames
    Armond White What makes Get On Up, the James Brown biopic in theaters August 1, the most immediately enjoyable movie of the year has everything to do with Brown’s powerful, exultant, still-radical music—and the attitude that produced it. That attitude is epitomized in a scene during the early 1950s when young, pre-“Godfather of Soul” James (played by Chadwick Boseman) meets his rock and roll forerunner Little Richard Penniman (Brandon Mychal Smith). There they are: Two Georgia boys on their way to pop music immortality but first they have to figure out how to get there—an itinerary that overlaps with the gay experience: 1) Lift themselves above the clearly-shown social misery of the Jim Crow era. 2) Define American racism as the tricky obstacle it is. 3) Perfect their artistry as an expression of their personalities. Boseman and Smith are intense onstage (a rivalry scene with Brown and group jumping in unison as they perform “Caldonia” is delirious) and vivid even in conversation. Recognizing each other’s talent and sensuality, their confab opens up emotional possibilities as surely as their music did. Smith’s bold seduction stops the show. He gives Little Richard’s take-me-as-I-am elegance a fierceness that Brown looks at and approves. They’re simpatico and this brotherly rapport would ultimately reveal itself in stage style so fabulous the world was helpless to concede. Style as a means of rebellion is a gay axiom (true, whether in drag balls or Brown’s definitions of “Funk”) and it’s proven when Brown finances his own legendary Live at the Apollo album: He insists on wearing “a sapphire suit” and that his band dress in “purple brocade.” Brown’s own eyes widen at the pioneering vision—as if already sees Michael Jackson, R. Kelly and Prince. These great musicians (cultural scholar William T. Lhamon winked that Little Richard’s “talent was promiscuous”) also represent a fortuitous moment in the history of American sexual identity. Their music urged sexual frankness—from a time when the term “rock and roll” was a widely understood synonym for sex and American pop music, officially segregated, was also unstoppably cross-fertilizing. Brown and Little’s erotic richness (songs like “Tutti-Frutti” and “Get on Up (I Feel Like a Sex Machine)”) influenced their look and behavior. This film shows the pre-Civil Rights Era fad of black men “processing” their hair to relax kinks into wavy or straight tresses that allowed outrageous vanity—pompadours to rival female couture. There’s a reason hairdressers also referred to themselves as estheticians and Brown and Little Richard brought that skill and proud self-regard out of the shadows of black American life and above ground. (Hairstyles are part of the film’s delight.) Brown would name his early band The Famous Flames, partly acknowledging the black and gay subculture where creativity thrived despite the deprivations of social bigotry. Get On Up’s director Tate Taylor understands this esthetic revolution, equating it with women’s desperate longing to realize themselves, an insight familiar from gay Hollywood director George Cukor and what used to be called “women’s pictures”—a talent Taylor updates (abominably in The Help but movingly here where Octavia Butler, Jill Scott, Tika Sumpter and Viola Davis all hit peak). Taylor flips that insight into Brown and Little Richard’s flaming fearlessness. When Little Richard warns Brown “the devil’s gonna come to you but he won’t be red, he’ll be white”—the audacity of his business and existential advice shows social and political awareness perhaps only a white Southerner like Taylor would dare. In Get On Up it isn’t just James Brown and Little Richard’s music that is explosive. ]]>
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  • A Better-Than Black List
    (”Get on Up” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Ruling film culture starts with controlling film history, so last week the New York Times announced, “Our chief critics have chosen essential movies from the 20th century that convey the larger history of black Americans in cinema.” The selection of 28 movies to match the number of days in February, Black History Month, is a cute reduction. Reducing the image and the work of blacks in American movies limits how readers observe black achievement in cinema (and in America) to a diurnal diet of predictable attitudes: blacks are seen as curiosities, as subjects bound by society’s limit, as intellectual cannon fodder.
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John Nolte3
Daily Wire / Breitbart



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Countdown: The 165 Greatest American Movies Ever Made (66-90)
    Hud (1963) You don’t look out for yourself, the only helping hand you’ll ever get is when they lower the box. Another one of those roles Paul Newman could have easily won the Best Actor Oscar for. Here he plays one of the most despicable, amoral characters ever; a full-throated villain in the charismatic package of the perfect physical specimen that was the 38-year-old. Presented in stark, Oscar-winning widescreen black and white (gorgeously filmed by the legendary James Wong Howe), Hud is an unsparing morality tale that makes the audience just as complicit as the young man played by Brandon DeWilde. We too are at first charmed and fascinated by Hud; by his composure, his cool, his cynicism, the mistaken impression he is merely being his own man. Slowly, though, the facade is peeled away until the private hell we leave Hud to feels like justice. Oscars went to a never-sexier Patricia Neal, as the housekeeper torn apart by her attraction to Hud’s virility and potential, and the the fact that she has seen enough of life to know that his rotted core can only mean a life so miserable the sex will eventually not be worth it.  Melvyn Douglas
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  • ‘Straight Outta Compton’ Review: Hobbled By Clichés and Whitewash
    (”Get on Up” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Before the movie begins, over the opening Universal Pictures logo, director F. Gary Gray’s “Straight Outta Compton” opens with the sound that came to define South Central Los Angeles in the late 80’s and early 90’s — the sound of a police helicopter flyover. The year is 1986, the city is Compton, and Eric “Eazy-E” Wright is surrounded by bad people pointing pistols and sawed-off shotguns. Unfazed, E’s still demanding money owed to him from a drug deal. It is an impossible situation. Either Eazy-E saves his own life by backing down and losing his street rep, or he’s dead. And it is plainly obvious he has no intention of backing down. Then, just in the nick of time, his life is saved by the arrival of a unit from the Rampart Division’s notorious L.A.P.D. CRASH squad. The movie seems wholly unconcerned with the irony of the fact that without the aggressive policing instituted by then-police chief Daryl Gates, the founding member of N.W.A. (Niggaz Wit Attitudes) would not have survived to become rich and famous attacking the aggressive policing instituted by then-police chief Daryl Gates. N.W.A. was a little before my time. I was five years out of high
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    (Review Source)
  • 'Straight Outta Compton' Review: Hobbled By Cliches and Whitewash
    (”Get on Up” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Before the movie begins, over the opening Universal Pictures logo, director F. Gary Gray’s “Straight Outta Compton” opens with the sound that came to define South Central Los Angeles in the late 80’s and early 90’s — the sound of a police helicopter flyover. The year is 1986, the city is Compton, and Eric “Eazy-E” Wright is surrounded by bad people pointing pistols and sawed-off shotguns. Unfazed, E’s still demanding money owed to him from a drug deal. It is an impossible situation. Either Eazy-E saves his own life by backing down and losing his street rep, or he’s dead. And it is plainly obvious he has no intention of backing down. Then, just in the nick of time, his life is saved by the arrival of a unit from the Rampart Division’s notorious L.A.P.D. CRASH squad. The movie seems wholly unconcerned with the irony of the fact that without the aggressive policing instituted by then-police chief Daryl Gates, the founding member of N.W.A. (Niggaz Wit Attitudes) would not have survived to become rich and famous attacking the aggressive policing instituted by then-police chief Daryl Gates. N.W.A. was a little before my time. I was five years out of high
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    (Review Source)

The Federalist Staff1
The Federalist



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Captain America's Latest Film Delivers
    (”Get on Up” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Captain America’s Latest Film Delivers Without a false note in its two-and-a-half-hour run, ‘Captain America: Civil War’ may be the best Avengers movie yet. May 6, 2016 By Rebecca Cusey The geniuses at Marvel have figured out this superhero blockbuster movie thing. Take beloved characters and keep them true, mix in fantastic action scenes, weave in a theme that resonates with the audience—but never forget the audience comes to the movies, first and foremost, to have a good time. The latest example? “Captain America: Civil War,” a fully satisfying episode in the expanding Marvel Cinematic Universe. Without a false note in its two-and-a-half-hour run, this may be the best Avengers movie yet. It certainly holds its own in a franchise known for quality. As the advertising has promised, the film pits Captain America (Chris Evans) against Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.). The remaining heroes, plus a few newcomers, are forced to take sides, stretching their loyalties and causing some havoc in the process. Cry Havoc and Let Slip the Gods of War Havoc, as it turns out, is a ton of fun. The primary battle happens in an airport. Without ruining any surprises, let’s just say this long scene is absolutely the right blend of action and quips, explosions and laughs. All the action sequences are gripping, not too confusing, not too dark, just pure fun. Part of the reason these films work so well is because each character stays true to his or her primary motivation. Part of the reason these films work so well is because each character (and there are so many) stays true to his or her primary motivation. Each character has his or her story advanced, from Hawkeye’s (Jeremy Renner) pull between home life and action to the Scarlet Witch’s (Elizabeth Olsen) need to assert herself as an adult. Even War Machine (Don Cheadle) has his moment in the spotlight. These scenes flit by quickly, but we understand each person a tad better and care about them a bit more. That’s a hard trick to pull off with 12 superheroes to keep track of, not to mention the decidedly-less-super characters. Humor flows out of the essence of the characters, as well. We laugh most at those we love because their foibles are part of who they are. “Oh,” we think, laughing, “flirting with the amazingly still beautiful Marisa Tomei is SO something Iron Man would do!” That humor, with some excellent sight gags and a few nerdy references, makes the movie a chuckle-fest. The film introduces two new superheroes, one we haven’t met before onscreen and one we know all too well. Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman) is the son of a wise African king, a warrior and man of peace leading his people through the modern era. Boseman, who killed it as James Brown in the underappreciated “Get On Up,” plays the potentially hammy role with dignity and strength. He crackles onscreen. We will be seeing more of Black Panther. Since Marvel recently reacquired the rights to Spiderman, perhaps it shouldn’t be a shock that he makes an appearance in the film. If you’re rolling your eyes at yet another iteration of the webbed wonder, you’re not alone. The presentation is so pitch-perfect, however, he might win you over. Interwoven Fun and Sobriety The other reason the Avengers movies work so well is serious themes, but never at the expense of having a good time. The film focuses on an internal crisis of purpose, the fact that while superheroes battle for big ideas, innocents suffer. While Captain America never doubts the rightness of his actions, even as he mourns those lost, Iron Man is a bundle of doubts and worries. Cap does not hesitate to make hard choices. Iron Man would examine each option in depth if he could. He’s just trying to hold it together. While Captain America never doubts the rightness of his actions, Iron Man is a bundle of doubts and worries. This crisis of confidence feels so familiar, we do not need big, bad villains invading earth with otherworldly armies or maniacal demagogues attempting to rule the world. The villains will always be with us, but we need to figure ourselves out first. It is a civil war built into the fabric of America right now, evidenced in the real world by never-ending primaries and wars we can neither win nor leave. Some people in the audience, probably those further on the Right, are passionately #TeamCap. Others, probably those more on the Left, are just as strongly #TeamIronMan. One friend told me how it never occurred to her that Captain America might not be the hero and Iron Man might not be the villain until a friend shocked her by saying he was with Iron Man. Sometimes we get so locked in our own camps we never realize there might be another camp with a different perspective. The truth is that we need each other, those who never doubt and those who always doubt. That’s because, of course, we are all on the same side. This is what the Avengers keep trying to tell us. Like them, though, we seem to need to work it out for ourselves. ‘Captain America: Civil War’ is rated PG-13 for violence, action, and mayhem. There is no overt sexuality nor language and the violence is not gory. As long as kids are old enough to enjoy action, this is a good film to enjoy with the family. Rebecca Cusey is a movie critic based in Washington DC. She is a member of the Washington Area Film Critics Society and a voting Tomatomer Critic on Rotten Tomatoes. Follow her on Twitter @Rebecca_Cusey. Photo Marvel Entertainment / YouTube Captain America Captain America: Civil War Chris Evans Iron Man Marvel Marvel comics Robert Downey Jr superhero movies superheroes The Avengers Copyright © 2017 The Federalist, a wholly independent division of FDRLST Media, All Rights Reserved. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1463670073398-2'); }); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({mode:'thumbs-2r', container:'taboola-below-main-column-mix', placement:'below-main-column', target_type:'mix'}); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({flush:true}); 0 Comments /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'thefederalist23'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. comments powered by Disqus ]]>
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PJ Media Staff1
PJ Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Coming Soon to a Theater Near You: The Shelly and Barry Love Story
    (”Get on Up” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    PJ Media We should be used to the fawning adoration of Barack and Michelle Obama by now. It may not be as intense or as widespread as it used to be, but this story shows that Obama worship is still alive in some corners of the land.A film is in the works that will depict the "legendary" romance of Barack and Michelle Obama. The movie will center on the early days of their romance, including a re-enactment of their "epic" first date.Bringing this romantic drama to the screen will be an indie film company, Homegrown Pictures, and will star Get On Up’s Tika Sumpter as the young Michelle Robinson. No actor has been chosen to play Barack yet, which is probably just as well. Only a larger-than-life actor like Heston or Eastwood could possibly portray such an iconic figure.From Deadline Hollywood:As Presidential lore has it, the date took some convincing. Obama, then an idealistic first-year Harvard Law student, took a summer job as an associate at Chicago law firm Sidley Austin where he fell for lawyer Michelle Robinson, his younger boss. Southside With You spans the day she agreed to go out with him when the two visited the Art Institute, took a long walk, and caught a showing of Spike Lee’s new film, Do The Right Thing. They were married in 1992.Richard Tanne (Worst Friends, The Roman) is helming the indie feature from his own screenplay, and former Warner Independent exec Tracey Bing and Columbia Pictures alum Stephanie Allain (Hustle & Flow, Beyond The Lights) are producing for Allain’s Homegrown Pictures. The project originated with Tanne and Sumpter, who developed the script together and will executive produce. Filming is set to begin in July on location in Chicago.“I took her to this new movie that everybody was talking about, directed by a guy that not that many people had heard of, but it was supposed to be pretty good,” Obama recalled during the film’s 25th anniversary celebration this summer. The site of the Obamas’ first kiss – curbside, outside a Baskin-Robbins in Chicago’s Hyde Park – was commemorated with a city plaque in 2012.The inscription on that plaque is all that any Obamabot could hope for. It's a quote from the president's interview that appeared in O, The Oprah Magazine:On our first date, I treated her to the finest ice cream Baskin-Robbins had to offer, our dinner table doubling as the curb. I kissed her, and it tasted like chocolate.That's very nice. I'd hate to read a plaque describing my first date with my ex-wife. It would come with an "R" rating. And that's after it was cleaned up. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/blog/coming-soon-to-a-theater-near-you-the-shelly-and-barry-love-story/ previous Page 1 of 2 next   ]]>
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