Everybody Wants Some!!

Not rated yet!
Director
Richard Linklater
Runtime
1 h 56 min
Release Date
30 March 2016
Genres
Comedy
Overview
A comedy that follows a group of friends as they navigate their way through the freedoms and responsibilities of unsupervised adulthood.
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VJ Morton 3
Right Wing Film Geek



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)
  • Everybody Wants Some!!

    ★★★★½ Watched 08 Apr, 2016

    EVERYBODY WANTS SOME!! (Linklater, USA, 2016, 9)

    What I want to say sounds oxymoronic, but … Linklater has succeeded in making an uncritical critique of nostalgia. On one level this film is 200-proof, capital-N Nostalgia, completely self-absorbed in its era, in the filmmaker's own biography, and in the hanging-out vibe it encourages (there is no plot, per se; with a couple of thereby-significant caveats, below). It's an easy life to view through rose-tinted glasses -- the last weekend before classes… more

    40 likes

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    (Review Source)
  • Everybody Wants Some!!

    ★★★★½ Rewatched 15 Apr, 2016

    EVERYBODY WANTS SOME!! (Linklater, USA, 2016, 9) r

    Most important thing about a second viewing -- it felt shorter, despite neither being a short movie (117 minutes) nor having almost any plot in Aristotle's sense. The near-constant soundtrack of late-70s hits helps, as does the film's sun-kissed look and the near-total success of the individual scenes -- cult classic and endlessly quoted are moral certainties for this film's place in history. 

    But I also caught more character development and "growing… more

    5 likes

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    (Review Source)
  • Everybody Wants Some!!

    ★★★★½ Rewatched 07 May, 2016

    My bud Russell Lucas wanted to see this film as it hadn't yet reached his Pittsburgh hometown and I was not at all averse to a third view. The night before, we were at Redneck Sports Bar and Russell got the DJ to play "Electric Avenue" (an in-joke between the two of us; don't ask). And he said, "y'know, say what you want about the music of the 80s, but the top of the charts were incredibly diverse. This is… more

    9 likes

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    (Review Source)

Plugged In 1
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Everybody Wants Some!!
    Comedy We hope this review was both interesting and useful. Please share it with family and friends who would benefit from it as well.Movie ReviewWhat was it like for a baseball jock to go to college in 1980? Richard Linklater, the director of Dazed and Confused and Boyhood, proffers a raunchy, nostalgic, dude-centric answer to that question. And it's about what you'd expect, coming from Hollywood and all. Sex? Check. Beer? Check. Pot? Check. Hazing? Check. Swearing? Check. Ping-Pong? Check. Romance? Maybe just a bit. Western Civ? Nah. More sex? Check. The two exclamation points in the title Everybody Wants Some!! are not-so-subtle clues to the enthusiasm with which the movie's collegians embrace the checkmarked pursuits posted above. This is the quirky chronicle of nonstop, debauchery-drenched hijinks indulged by a baseball team over the weekend before classes commence at an unnamed university. At the center of the story's lazily meandering, mostly plot-free narrative is Jake. A star pitcher in high school, Jake is eager to make a big impression as a college freshman. He's joined by three other first-year teammates: Ty Plummer and Alex Brumley are equal parts suave and earnest, and Jake's roommate in the ramshackle, fraternity-like mansion that houses the team is country kid Billy Autrey. Schooling them in the finer points of college life is a rogues' gallery of upperclassmen. McReynolds is the Big Man on Campus, so skilled as a hitter that he can split a baseball in two with an axe if that's what he's holding at the time. Finnegan dabbles in philosophical mumbo jumbo, changing up his pitch (metaphorically speaking) to attract whatever lovely lass has most recently caught his eye. Charlie Willoughby, another pitcher, has made peace with his eccentricities—which is to say he smokes a lot of weed. Hot-tempered Nesbit doesn't like losing … at anything. Dale majors in smooth. As for Coma, well, his name says it all. Orbiting around the outskirts of the team is Jay Niles, yet another oddball pitcher whose elephantine ego is matched only by his gangly geekiness and utter self-obliviousness. Together, the guys imbibe a seemingly endless supply of alcohol, bed a bevy of willing female partners, smoke piles of pot, josh and joke and sneer, and—ever so occasionally—ponder what matters in life besides baseball, beer 'n' babes. For most of these guys, the easy answer to that is an unabashed "not much."Positive ElementsEverything is definitely not OK in Everybody Wants Some!! Still, I can at least say here that this team of scratch-and-grunt guys still embraces an ideal of sorts when it comes to brotherhood. There's an almost tribal "all for one, one for all" mentality wherein members defend other members and seek solidarity and inclusion. We hear: "It's about the team, it's not about you." One guy dares to wonder what they're going to do after playing college ball if they don't make the pros. And after the guys wander through a disco club, a country music bar and then a punk rock bar over the course of two nights—quickly assimilating the identities and attitudes associated with each genre in their never-ending quest to "score" with the ladies—Jake sagely observes, "It sort of begs the question of who we are." Elsewhere, he remarks, "Getting in the grove" of life means "accepting what comes your way." One young woman maintains that "things only mean as much as the meaningfulness we allow them to have." When Jake meets a pretty, smart theater major named Beverly, their blossoming romance is about as surprisingly tender as everything else around him and his team of testosterone-fueled bros is shamelessly "tough." In an old-fashioned way, Jake tapes flowers and a note to Beverly's door to try to get her attention.Spiritual ContentJake and Beverly have a conversation that revolves around a paper Jake wrote on the Greek myth of Sisyphus, who was fated to forever push a huge boulder up a hill each day, only to have it plunge back down. Jack tries to see the upside in the tale. "The gods intended Sisyphus to suffer," he says, then adds that they "blessed him with something to focus on." Billy is aghast when he hears a rumor that a professor denies the existence of Jesus. Willoughby thinks humanity once had telepathic powers and babbles about the spirituality of Mayans and Druids. Finnegan pretends to be into astrology to pick up a girl. We see a Buddha bong.Sexual ContentNumerous scenes take place in various bars that feature sensual dancing and women wearing revealing clothing. The camera often zooms in on their curves, representing the leering the guys do. But leering isn't where things end. Not even close. A sex scene montage after guys pick up girls at a disco cycles through shots of couples disrobing and having sex (in bedrooms, in cars, etc.). On display are passionate kissing and groping, bare backs, bare breasts and sexual movements. There's little talk of the consequences of such sexual exploits. But Billy does tell the guys that his girlfriend back home thinks she might be pregnant. They mock him mercilessly, telling him he'll have to decide whether to marry her or help her get an abortion—which they characterize as a lose-lose situation. Crude conversations about sex or sexual anatomy (involving such words as "p---y," "d--k" and "poontang") crop up continually. There are references to oral sex, masturbation and incest. At a party, women play Twister in their underwear. Similarly clad, two mud wrestle. Guys are shown in underwear and jock straps. In a car, several of the guys shout rudely for female students to pull their shirts up. There are winking nods to S&M. Two girls are encouraged to kiss each other at a party (and they do). But the guys are horrified to hear a guy in drag allude to sex with other men, and they joke nervously about him being gay.Recommended ResourceA Chicken's Guide to Talking Turkey With Your Kids About SexKevin LemanEven the bravest parents feel timid about discussing sex with their 8- to 14-year-olds! This resource offers reassuring, humorous, real-life anecdotes along with reliable information to help you with this challenging task.Buy NowViolent ContentA team tradition involves duct-taping freshmen players to the center field wall … then having batting practice to try to nail the immobilized players. We see several take hard shots to the head, stomach and—of course—crotch. A game of "knuckles" leaves a guy's hand badly bloodied. McReynolds angrily throws and breaks a Ping-Pong paddle after losing a game. Someone gets bounced off a mechanical bull. Jay picks a fight with a bartender that nearly becomes an uncontrolled brawl before Jay and the rest of the team get forcibly removed from the bar by bouncers. Furious, Jay also attacks … a fence. Nes playfully takes on a female mud wrestler only to get body slammed by her twice.Crude or Profane LanguageAbout 150 f-words, a few of them mashed up with "mother," one with Jesus' name. A door has a sign on it that reads, "Fornication Under Consent of the King Room." The s-word tally tops 50. A slew of vulgarities includes "a--," "a--hole," "p---y," "t-ts," "c--k" and "d--k." "Douchebag" and "f-ggot" are used once each. God's name is abused seven or eight times, paired at least once with "d--n." Jesus name is profanely exclaimed a half-dozen times.Drug and Alcohol ContentThe guys' coach tells them that they're not allowed to have alcohol in the house or women upstairs—rules that are utterly ignored. Alcohol (mostly beer, occasionally hard liquor) gets consumed from start to finish. Drinking games and other such exploits include beer bongs and guzzling from a keg while being held upside down. A massive bender leaves people passed out all over the place (including on the roof). Willoughby has an affinity for pot and turns several other teammates onto it. Thus, we watch as four of them take long drags from a bong. Weed crops up at another party as well, and someone makes pot brownies. There's a veiled allusion to students snorting cocaine. Billy stuffs chewing tobacco into his mouth. People smoke cigarettes, and one guy has a pipe.Other Negative ElementsA locker room prank involves tricking someone into shutting his eyes and having another guy in a jock strap squat over his face. Someone flaunts a symbol for anarchy. Beverly describes rock 'n' roll as a (positive) revolutionary political and sexual force. She talks about dancers making themselves vomit to control their weight. There's a mean joke about a "fat girl."ConclusionBoys will be boys. That's what the old saw says. And anyone who uses that phrase in earnest means something like, "Well, you can't hold boys accountable for their bad choices because, well, it won't make any difference anyway." This film uses that phrase in earnest. There's absolutely no accountability or consequences here for anyone. At all. The closest we ever come to that all-but-alien idea is when Billy ponders the implications of his girlfriend possibly being pregnant—a situation that's immediately laughed off by his bros. Speaking of bros, there's a lot of bro-ness in Everybody Wants Some!! In fact, it might be the bro-iest movie I've ever seen. Occasionally—very occasionally—the film's focus on brotherhood leads to poignant moments of vulnerability or reflection. Ha!! Who am I kidding here? This ode to the early '80s that takes its title from a Van Halen song is really all about perpetually partying jocks scrounging around for another beer, another joint and another unsuspecting female conquest.Pro-social ContentObjectionable ContentSummary AdvisoryPlot SummaryChristian BeliefsOther Belief SystemsAuthority RolesProfanity/ViolenceKissing/Sex/HomosexualityDiscussion TopicsAdditional Comments/NotesEpisode Reviews]]>
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    (Review Source)

Debbie Schlussel 1
The New York Post



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Wknd Box Office: Everybody Wants Some!!, Criminal, The Jungle Book, The Adderall Diaries
    Blog Posts Movie Reviews The Adderall Diaries – R: This is just awful. A complete, extremely boring waste of time. This is yet another one of those movies, the idea of which is better than the execution. It’s boring, slow, and disjointed, on top of the fact that instead of delving into the plot, it focuses on artsy fartsy crap. And no wonder. This is one of those low-budget, arthouse flicks that belongs there. James Franco plays an author who writes about his childhood of abuse at the hands of his evil father. He writes of his life of drugs and homelessness and how he overcame it. He also wrote that his father was dead. The books sell, and he’s a successful, rising-star writer. But, one day, his “dead” father shows up at one of Franco’s public readings of his book. And, thus, his rising career as a writer is ended (or, at least, paused) because he’s shown to be a fraud. The father claims none of it is true–that he was a good father and did the best he could, while his son, the writer, was a very troubled kid and problem child. Who is telling the truth? The movie never really tells us, though there are a series of disjointed, sudden flashbacks throughout the movie–all of which are ambiguous, once the father appears. Anyway, because of the “dead” father’s appearance and claims that the book is a lie and defamatory, Franco loses all of his book and writing deals, but for one. He’s set to write monthly (or weekly?) articles for a publication, and he manages to hold on to that gig because he pitches covering a murder trial as the topic of the articles. A wealthy man is on trial for killing his missing wife, whose body has never been found. Franco has visions of becoming the next Truman Capote by covering the trial. He also believes the hubby is innocent. While covering the trial, Franco meets Amber Heard, a New York Times reporter also covering the trial. They begin a troubled romance that includes the use of drugs, including Adderall. Like I said, the idea of this was interesting. But the brief trial coverage and scenes of the accused murderer (and what eventually happens with that) seem like an afterthought. And the relationship with Heard is uninteresting and bland. Even the interaction between the author and his allegedly dead, allegedly abusive dad is banal and boring. This movie is pointless and a waste of time. And I struggled to get through it. You would, too, but I’m saving you the ten-bucks-plus and time you’d have wasted. Because now you’ve been forewarned. TWO MARXES ]]>
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Acculturated 1
Acculturated



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Let's Hear It for the Bros
    It’s good to be a young jock. To feel strong, graceful, metaphysically focused on a task, and able to easily overpower or humiliate an opposing player on the field is righteous and cool. It’s a feeling that non-jocks don’t really get to experience, and ever since Steve Jobs recreated the world in his garage, nerds took over and jocks are not valorized the way they once were. Oh, ball players are gushed over on ESPN and in the sports pages, but in the era of Caitlyn Jenner, antipathy towards “bro” culture, the ascendance of the comic geek, and trigger warnings, being a confident heterosexual ball player doesn’t translate into the kind of wide glorification it once did. This is what makes Everybody Wants Some!!, the new Richard Linklater film, so intoxicating. The film depicts three days in the lives of a group of college baseball players in Texas in 1980, and if I hadn’t lived through a similar milieu around the same time I might not believe it was real. Everybody Wants Some!! is basically a plotless two hours depicting a group of dudes partying, chasing girls, fighting, competing at everything from Ping Pong to knuckle-wrapping, and eventually playing some baseball. It’s also hilarious and fearless.   The plot of the film is straightforward: Pitcher Jake Bradford (Blake Jenner) arrives at the fictional University of South Texas to play baseball. He and his teammates quickly bond by driving through campus and singing along to “Rapper’s Delight.” Linklater perfectly captures the easy friendships that are made in high school and college, particularly among jocks who are thrown together for a common goal and don’t like to waste time on small talk. The de facto leader, Finn (Glen Powell), calls them a tribe. What makes Everybody Wants Some!! so brave is that it reasserts some truisms that social justice warriors recently have spent a tremendous amount of energy trying to deny. First, jocks, like everybody else, are individuals. They are funny, arrogant, depressed, racist, liberal, joyful, sarcastic, and weepy. Second, the great ones have something rare: an addiction to winning, and the ability to focus on that outcome with preternatural precision. In the modern PC era of everybody-gets-a-trophy and we’re-all-special, the sight of a bunch of bros swinging axes, admiring their own bodies, and never questioning the superior virtue of their goal is like seeing pictures of a medieval jousting match. However, if the guys in EWS are a tribe, they are an open-minded one. While a lot of reviewers of EWS were pouting about the film’s atavism and lack of diversity—“who wants to watch a bro movie in 2016?” Slate asked—Noah Gittell in the Guardian nailed what makes the film, and the time it depicts, special. Young people have always segregated themselves in cliques, but in the early 1980s the demarcations were less absolute. As Gittell notes in the Guardian: As a modern-day viewer watching Linklater’s depiction of 1982 college life, I found myself bracing for the inevitable conflict, especially when Jake falls for a theater girl. Surely, his team-mates—none of whom are particularly bright—will be threatened by Jake’s mingling with another social group. But that’s not what happens. Jake brings them to the party, and they embrace the novelty of being in an unusual environment with unlike-minded people. And that’s not all: over the course of the film, they visit a disco, a country and western bar, and a punk rock club. They change their attire to fit in, but they don’t change themselves. They’re open to new experiences—such as their first mosh pit—and they rarely prejudge new acquaintances. Yes, this is a rosy view. There have always been, and always will be, jocks who are racists, misogynistic, and intolerant bullies. But as someone who both played baseball and went to punk clubs in the early 1980s, I can vouch for the reality of Linklater’s vision (including, I’m afraid, the house party scene). There really was more mixing among the tribes back then. The guys in Everybody Wants Some!! compete, often with absurd intensity, in everything from Nerf basketball to ping-pong. They’re cocky. But some of them also listen to Neil Young and, at least in Finn’s case, read Jack Kerouac. It’s also lovely to see young people spend two hours courting, joking, playing, and conversing without once looking at a cell phone. When Jake sees a girl he likes, he returns to leave flowers and a note on her door. Back then guys had to work for it. In his Guardian review, Noah Gittell laments that today we “carefully curate our social media feeds to exclude those people who disagree with us; and when someone offers us a political perspective we don’t understand, we too often shut them out rather than truly consider their point of view. This is the cause, not the symptom, of our political divisiveness, and it’s quickly getting to the point where we rarely meet someone who differs from us in any fundamental way.” Everybody Wants Some!! reminds us what the social justice warriors want us to forget: white bros, even handsome and athletic ones, are people too.           ]]>
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    (Review Source)

Tim Markatos 1
The American Conservative



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The Best Films of 2016
    (”Everybody Wants Some!!” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    It’s time once again for that hallowed, year-end tradition of comparing cinematic apples, oranges, bananas, mangoes, pears, peaches, and kiwis. Two notes: 1. You know as well as I do that Silence would have factored into this list if I had had the patience to wait and see it before publishing this. Be that as it may, now I get to watch it and judge it on its own terms, rather than in terms of which of these 10 movies it might displace. 2. If I were to try to summarize what drew me to each of these movies, I would propose that it’s a shared quality of deep or attentive listening. What I mean by that exactly I leave for you to ponder as you read my list. 
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    (Review Source)

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