Crazy Heart

Not rated yet!
Director
Scott Cooper
Runtime
1 h 52 min
Release Date
16 December 2009
Genres
Drama, Music, Romance
Overview
When reporter Jean Craddock interviews Bad Blake -- an alcoholic, seen-better-days country music legend -- they connect, and the hard-living crooner sees a possible saving grace in a life with Jean and her young son. But can he leave behind an existence playing in the shadow of Tommy, the upstart kid he once mentored?
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Kyle Smith4
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Review: "Crazy Heart"
    Jeff Bridges is stellar in a deeply felt, completely convincing new movie about a broken-down country singer trying to repair his life. My review of “Crazy Heart” is up.]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Pop Coincidence of the Week
    (”Crazy Heart” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Last week I saw “Up in the Air” on Tuesday and then on Wednesday watched the new Jeff Bridges movie “Crazy Heart.” The former is about a guy named Ryan Bingham; in the latter, many of the songs are by country artist Ryan Bingham. (Did “Up in the Air” author Walter Kirn know the real Ryan Bingham?) This week brings a resurgence of the very first Paul McCartney solo hit from 1971, “Another Day.” “The Simpsons” led off with a lengthy sample of the song, used to illustrate Mrs. Crabapple’s lonely life, and in “The Lovely Bones,” which opens Friday, a generous slice of the track is heard playing on the radio as the family sits around the kitchen in 1973. (Meanwhile, of course, the track McCartney wrote for “Everybody’s Fine” plays over the closing credits of that film.) The “Another Day” boomlet is way overdue; though the single is the kind of thing that gets dismissed as typically McCartney-ish lite-FM glossy dross, and it’s gloomy-housewife feminism is very much of its time, it’s actually got an exhausted, frustrated ache to it, a balanced irony (the chorus “so sad” is sung in a lovely tone that mocks the protagonist’s inability to cope with her daily grind; the horrific possibility of suicide is merely glanced at in passing, as though it’s just another one of the bits and bobs the woman has to deal with) and some nice guitar work. It’s also the leadoff track of “Wings Greatest,” which is how I first came across it and which I listened to perhaps more than any other album in the mid-80s, more even than any Beatles album. John Lennon dissed the song in his legendary 1971 putdown “How Do You Sleep?” (It contains the lines “the only thing you done was ‘Yesterday’/And since you’ve gone you’re just ‘Another Day.'”) Now that Lennon’s clanky, lazy, monotonous attack is the one that’s forgotten and dated (its hostility, and the specificity of its attack, is the only interesting thing about it; it isn’t much of a song) and “Another Day” is being heard by millions this week, the last laugh once again belongs to Paul.]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Not My Top Ten List…But Almost
    (”Crazy Heart” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    As a teaser to my list of the ten best movies of 2009 — coming in Sunday’s Post! — I’ll give a hint: Here are my numbers 11-25. If your movie isn’t on here, it’s either in the top ten or not in the top 25. I reserve the right to adjust the list as there are a couple of major 2009 releases I haven’t seen, including Avatar, which screens tomorrow night. 11. Coraline 12. Crazy Heart 13. Paranormal Activity 14. Adventureland 15. The White Ribbon 16. Everybody’s Fine 17. The Taking of Pelham 1 2 3 18. Broken Embraces 19. The Hangover 20. The Cove 21. Jennifer’s Body 22. Gigantic 23. Observe and Report 24. World’s Greatest Dad 25. Il Divo]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Paul McCartney for Best Original Song
    (”Crazy Heart” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Paul McCartney saw “Everybody’s Fine,” the new Robert De Niro dramedy about a lonely widower determined to bring his family together by visiting each of his children in turn around the holidays, and decided to write a lovely song that plays over the closing credits. The story is here. I think McCartney stands an excellent chance to finally win a Best Original Song Oscar (he was nominated for “Live and Let Die” and “Vanilla Sky”). He might be competing with U2, which has a song playing over the closing credits of Jim Sheridan’s “Brothers,” which like “Everybody’s Fine” opens tomorrow. (The U2 song is a fairly weak effort, though.) The new Jeff Bridges country-western movie “Crazy Heart,” meanwhile, has an excellent group of (I think) original songs, one or more of which could easily be nominated, although I doubt the Academy includes a lot of country fans.]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Hugh Hewitt1
Salem Radio Network



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The Crazy Heart Congress
    Yesterday I interviewed Robert Duvall, who is out touting the Oscar-worthiness of his Crazy Heart co-star Jeff Bridges. (The transcript of the Duvall conversation is here and the audio is here.) Bridges plays Bad Blake in the film, a singer who is addicted to drink. It is a beautiful film of loss and redemption, and Bridges should walk away with the honors, as will the song “Weary Kind” by Ryan Bingham and perhaps even Maggie Gyllenhaal, nominated for best actress in a supporting role. Thus I was thinking about addicts and their troubles when yesterday’s story about a new “jobs bill” hit the news. Senators Baucus and Grassley had appeared to announce a new era of bipartisanship and an $85 billion dollar spending bill to help create jobs. The United States doesn’t have $85 billion. It would simply be added to the deficit, the enormous, gigantic and growing deficit. The “deal” had collapsed by the end of the day as Republicans shuddered and Harry Reid beat a retreat, but the message to the country was clear: The Congress still doesn’t get it. It is still addicted to spending money it doesn’t have in pursuit of a political redemption they cannot earn after TARP and the stimulus that wasn’t, after the takeover of GM and the still underway attempt to takeover all of banking and of course the undead Obamacare monster. Congress is still hitting the bottle, hard. Even though it is going to kill many of its members politically. Most of the Republicans are in recovery, but as Senator Grassley proved yesterday, each one of them is one shiny press availability away from falling back into the depths of the governing style that proved their undoing in 2006 and 2008. “What you’ve had in the last year is you’ve had a grass roots anger manifesting itself in the Tea Parties and town halls,” Mark Steyn told my audience yesterday. “And, belatedly, the Republican members of the United States Senate sort of caught onto it, caught on to what was happening. But their instincts are still to do what Senator Grassley did, which is to go along with the Democrats. And it makes no sense at all. The Democrats ought to have, this joke of a jobs bill ought to be hung around the necks of the Democrats only, so that every time the jobs bill is mentioned as another Obama laughing stock like the stimulus and all the other stuff, it will be branded Democrat only. I mean, Grassley must understand that. I know he’s been there since Reconstruction, but he must understand that, surely.” Surely? I don’t know. I thought so. The MSM braying about the phoney bipartisanship offers from our stunt president has apparently cowed some of the GOP who just a few weeks ago on the morning after the election of Massachusetts had seemed to recognize that the country was clamoring for a fundamental overhaul of D.C. The country didn’t vote for the Obama-Pelosi-Reid huge lurch left. They are in fact horrified by it. Like the Gyllenhaal character in the movie, they trusted known addicts and they got the inevitable result. What the GOP has to do, every day from now until November, is recommit to doing it differently, to stop the wild spending and the urge to step forward with a government program as a means of garnering favor. It doesn’t work and the public grows increasingly impatient for serious people saying serious things about our out-of-control federal government and our bankrupt states. Senator Grassley’s huge mistake yesterday was a reminder to the GOP that it cannot have just one drink. It has to stand where it stood throughout 2009 –on principled opposition to the Obama agenda, no matter how many times a CNN correspondent insinuates that Republicans are somehow stopping the government from solving pressing problems. The country knows, as Ronald Reagan once famously said, that government is the problem right now, and must be pushed back and carved down, immediately. This is no place for the weary kind of Congressman. The members of the GOP who do not have the stomach to trust their voters who have told them again and again what they want done but who instead want to gain the praise of the Sunday show hosts had just better retire. It is possible to change the Congress, and the voters are going to do that in November. The GOP’s job between now and then is to ready themselves to actually do the work of reducing the size and cost of the government, and to fight every day against Obamacare, against the takeover of the banks, and against every ridiculous line of spending in this ridiculous budget. Can they stay sobered up for nine months? Can they persuade the public that they will stay that way in 2011 and 2012? Take a congressman or a staffer to see Crazy Heart. Tell them that is how they are viewed. Everybody knows they are out of control and looking more and more foolish by the moment. Spread the word. . ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Steve Sailer1
Taki Mag



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Get Low: Stellar Cast, Shoddy Screenplay
    (”Crazy Heart” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Get Low, a dramedy starring venerable elders Robert Duvall, Bill Murray, and Cissy Spacek, is promisingly based on a prime slab of Old, Weird Americana: the true 1938 story of an elderly hillbilly (played by Duvall) who hired an undertaker (Murray) to throw him a huge funeral before he died. The Southern period setting is reminiscent of two of the most imaginative films of the last decade: the Coen Brothers’ O Brother, Where Art Thou? and Tim Burton’s Big Fish. Not surprisingly, Get Low has garnered 100 percent positive ratings among Top Critics on RottenTomatoes.com. Teddy Roosevelt’s daughter Alice said of her spotlight-loving father, “He wants to be the bride at every wedding, the corpse at every funeral, and the baby at every christening.” In this same spirit, the illiterate Tennessee codger Felix Bushaloo Breazeale decided to enjoy hearing his own eulogy. Breazeale’s whim captured the fancy of the nation. Soon, he had a publicity agent and newspapers were treating the faux funeral like the biggest news in Tennessee since the Scopes Monkey Trial. About ten thousand people from 14 states swarmed the festivities. A two-mile long traffic jam left Uncle Bush late for his own funeral. The “living corpse” savored every moment of the “doin’s and goin’s on,” chuckling “Folks, I’m tellin’ ya, this business of having your funeral before you die beats sparkin’ in a buggy.” Afterwards, he autographed fans’ programs with his “X.” The 74-year-old backwoodsman then went to New York and appeared on Ripley’s Believe It Or Not Radio Show, but reported back that big city “victuals weren’t worth a dern.” He lived on another half decade, entertaining his numerous visitors by having his mule (named “Mule”) perform tricks. The one thing you shouldn’t do in filming this tale is leave out all the Appalachian absurdity to render it tasteful, subdued, bittersweet, quasi-tragic Oscar-bait. Unfortunately, that’s exactly what first time director Aaron Schneider and the various screenwriters attempt. ”Get Low fails like a recent Shyamalan movie at the basic blocking and tackling of putting the camera in the right place, cutting shots at the right moment, and swelling the right chords.” The 79-year-old Duvall is being talked up for a second Oscar, based, apparently, on the Commutative Property of Film Appreciation. See, last year Jeff Bridges got his first Oscar in Crazy Heart, another ornery coot movie in which Duvall played the best friend. So, this must be Duvall’s turn, right? He might indeed win for Get Low, because Duvall here delivers Acting for the Sake of Acting in the tradition of Al Pacino in Scent of a Woman. If you read beyond the critics’ blurbs, though, you’ll notice the strain of talking themselves into liking Get Low. Reviewing movies—making the basic Thumbs Up or Thumbs Down call—isn’t a terribly difficult trade … because making good movies is. Compare the execution of the last two Christopher Nolan movies, Inception and The Dark Knight, to M. Night Shyamalan’s The Last Airbender and The Happening. You may not understand what’s going on in Nolan’s movies, but you’re obviously in more capable hands. Therefore, when reviewers uniformly overrate a film, it’s typically due to either politics—as with the mediocre lesbian sitcom The Kids Are All Right, which critics praised as if it were the second coming of It’s a Wonderful Life to heroically stand up to the Mormon Media Juggernaut—or respect and nostalgia. Get Low fails like a recent Shyamalan movie at the basic blocking and tackling of putting the camera in the right place, cutting shots at the right moment, and swelling the right chords. Those aren’t weakness that we reviewers can explain in 800 words, though. The screenplay’s faults, however, are more easily explicable. Duvall’s character is turned into a recluse with a mysterious backstory, which the tortured soul feels the need to confess to the assembled mob, Jerry Springer Show-style. Another anachronistic touch is turning the presiding minister from white to black. I kept expecting the 1938 Tennessee crowd to react like the Western townsfolk eagerly awaiting their new sheriff in Blazing Saddles, but nobody notices. (Veteran character actor Bill Cobbs shows self-respect by playing his silly Magic Negro role with a strong note of contempt.) Murray’s portrayal of a shady Chicago car dealer who has washed up in rural Tennessee as a funeral director starts out strongly. After whining about the unanticipated local death dearth, he hears that Duvall has hitched up his mule and come to town flashing a roll of cash. The salesman exclaims with avaricious expertise, “Ooh, hermit money!” But Murray’s character slowly fades. Murray is that rare phenomenon—a low energy movie star, the anti-Tom Cruise. In Lost in Translation, he flourished as the still, sad center of swirling Japanese wackiness. In Zombieland, he floored audiences in his cameo as a golfing Bill Murray in living dead drag. Yet, pairing the minimalist actor and the minimalist director Jim Jarmusch in 2005’s Broken Flowers inevitably sputtered out. Similarly, Murray is ultimately undermined by Get Low’s overarching flaw: lack of incident. googletag.cmd.push(function() {googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1456852648633-0');}); if(display_ads_server){document.write('');}; SIGN UPDaily updates with TM’s latest // delete this script tag and use a "div.mce_inline_error{ XXX !important}" selector // or fill this in and it will be inlined when errors are generated var mc_custom_error_style = ''; var fnames = new Array();var ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';fnames[1]='FNAME';ftypes[1]='text';fnames[2]='LNAME';ftypes[2]='text';var err_style = ''; try{ err_style = mc_custom_error_style; } catch(e){ err_style = 'margin: 1em 0 0 0; padding: 1em 0.5em 0.5em 0.5em; background: ERROR_BGCOLOR none repeat scroll 0% 0%; font-weight: bold; float: left; z-index: 1; width: 80%; -moz-background-clip: -moz-initial; -moz-background-origin: -moz-initial; -moz-background-inline-policy: -moz-initial; color: ERROR_COLOR;'; } var mce_jQuery = jQuery.noConflict(); mce_jQuery(document).ready( function($) { var options = { errorClass: 'mce_inline_error', errorElement: 'div', errorStyle: err_style, onkeyup: function(){}, onfocusout:function(){}, onblur:function(){} }; var mce_validator = mce_jQuery("#mc-embedded-subscribe-form").validate(options); options = { url: 'http://takimag.us1.list-manage1.com/subscribe/post-json?u=0ba7696a8a378946b7e688500&id=f7706afea2&c=?', type: 'GET', dataType: 'json', contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8", beforeSubmit: function(){ mce_jQuery('#mce_tmp_error_msg').remove(); mce_jQuery('.datefield','#mc_embed_signup').each( function(){ var txt = 'filled'; var fields = new Array(); var i = 0; mce_jQuery(':text', this).each( function(){ fields[i] = this; i++; }); mce_jQuery(':hidden', this).each( function(){ if ( fields[0].value=='MM' && fields[1].value=='DD' && fields[2].value=='YYYY' ){ this.value = ''; } else if ( fields[0].value=='' && fields[1].value=='' && fields[2].value=='' ){ this.value = ''; } else { this.value = fields[0].value+'/'+fields[1].value+'/'+fields[2].value; } }); }); return mce_validator.form(); }, success: mce_success_cb }; mce_jQuery('#mc-embedded-subscribe-form').ajaxForm(options); }); function mce_success_cb(resp){ mce_jQuery('#mce-success-response').hide(); mce_jQuery('#mce-error-response').hide(); if (resp.result=="success"){ mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(resp.msg); mce_jQuery('#mc-embedded-subscribe-form').each(function(){ this.reset(); }); } else { var index = -1; var msg; try { var parts = resp.msg.split(' - ',2); if (parts[1]==undefined){ msg = resp.msg; } else { i = parseInt(parts[0]); if (i.toString() == parts[0]){ index = parts[0]; msg = parts[1]; } else { index = -1; msg = resp.msg; } } } catch(e){ index = -1; msg = resp.msg; } try{ if (index== -1){ mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(msg); } else { err_id = 'mce_tmp_error_msg'; html = '
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    ...
    (Review Source)

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