Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky

Not rated yet!
Director
Jan Kounen
Runtime
2 h 00 min
Release Date
30 December 2009
Genres
Drama, Romance
Overview
Paris 1913. Coco Chanel is infatuated with the rich and handsome Boy Capel, but she is also compelled by her work. Igor Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring is about to be performed. The revolutionary dissonances of Igor's work parallel Coco's radical ideas. She wants to democratize women's fashion; he wants to redefine musical taste. Coco attends the scandalous first performance of The Rite in a chic white dress. The music and ballet are criticized as too modern, too foreign. Coco is moved but Igor is inconsolable.
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  • Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky

    1,137 words

    [1]Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky is a 2009 French film directed by Jan Kounen, starring Anna Mouglalis as French couturier Gabrielle Bonheur “Coco” Chanel (1883–1971) and Mads Mikkelsen as Russian composer Igor Stravinsky (1882–1971). Based on the novel Coco & Igor by Chris Greenhalgh, this movie tells the story of a reputed affair that took place in 1920.

    The plot is fairly simple: In 1913, Coco Chanel attended the premier of The Rite of Spring: Pictures from Pagan Russia at Serge Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes in Paris. Stravinsky composed the music. Nicholas Roerich painted the sets and designed the costumes. And Vaslav Nijinsky was choreographer. The ballet represented a human sacrifice in pagan Russia to gain the favor of the god of spring. The music’s complex rhythms, innovative tonality, unusual orchestration, and barbaric, brutal emotional power are challenging even today. In 1913, The Rite caused a riot. The recreation of the premier of The Rite of Spring was the main reason I went to this movie, and it did not disappoint.

    In 1920, Stravinsky and his family are living in poverty as exiles from the Bolshevik Revolution. Chanel, who is in mourning for her lover Arthur Capel, meets Stravinsky again. A friendship develops, and she invites him to stay at her villa outside of Paris, where he could compose, his wife Catherine, who suffered from tuberculosis, could convalesce, and his four children could enjoy fresh air and sunshine. Stravinsky accepts her offer.

    Stravinsky settles in, but there is an air of sexual tension that finally explodes into an affair. While the affair is going on, Chanel works with perfumer Ernest Beaux to create Chanel No. 5.

    Stravinsky’s wife grows suspicious and finally takes the children to Switzerland. Torn between Coco and his family, Stravinsky finally breaks off the affair.

    Even though their affair is over, Chanel still serves as an anonymous patron for Stravinsky’s art, paying for a revival of The Rite of Spring to an audience that has finally caught up to Stravinsky’s music and is much more receptive.

    The movie ends with a poetic fizzle in 1971, the year both Chanel and Stravinsky died, portraying each of them in separate silent scenes, perhaps reminiscing about one another. Who can say?

    Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky is a beautifully crafted, well-acted, but ultimately rather empty film. It is a must-see movie only if one admires Chanel or Stravinsky or both and wishes to see their worlds in 1913 and 1920 reconstructed.

    [2]

    Igor Stravinsky

    That was enough for me. I like both Stravinsky and Chanel, so I found this movie worthwhile. They were both highly talented individuals in their own rights, but they also interest me because they combined avant-garde aesthetics with archaic, conservative, even reactionary tastes and convictions.

    The aesthetics of The Rite of Spring have meaningful parallels with Italian futurism and Guillaume Faye’s Archeofuturism. The same can even be said of Chanel’s menswear inspired fashions, which were designed for mobility and comfort in an age of automobiles and aviatrixes, yet wedded these functions to the beauty of classical and traditional forms.

    Stravinsky’s early music is so uncompromisingly avant-garde that many people just assume that he was leftist and a Jew. But Stravinsky was a devout Russian Orthodox Christian and patriot who had no illusions about what was being done in Russia and by whom. He was also a devoted family man (albeit one with a reputation for philandering).

    (It took me many years to “grow into” an appreciation of Stravinsky, but you owe it to yourself to try. Begin with The Rite of Spring. There are many recordings, but I particularly recommend the Pierre Boulez/Cleveland Orchestra recording [3] on Deutsche Grammophone, which also contains the ballet Petrouchka. Stravinsky’s later “neo-classical” works long struck me as abstract and emotionally repressed, with a false, superficial geniality. His Violin Concerto, however, is a work of great beauty and genuine passion. I recommend the Deutsche Grammophone recording [4] by Anne-Sophie von Mutter. For the price of both of these recordings, one can get Stravinsky conducting these works himself — along with 20 more discs of self-conducted works — in Sony’s boxed set Works of Igor Stravinsky [5] — surely one of the great bargains in the history of recorded music!)

    The child of illiterate French proles, Chanel began as a seamstress and hat maker and rose through her talents as a designer and shrewd businesswoman to become a famous (and immensely rich) arbiter of taste. She was named one of the 100 most influential people of the 20th century — the only designer in the bunch.

    The movie I would really love to see about Chanel would begin in 1925, when she became friends with Vera Bate Lombardi, a reputed illegitimate daughter of the Marquess of Cambridge. Chanel turned Lombardi’s personal style into the famous “English look” and through her was introduced to many of Europe’s royal and aristocratic families.

    In 1939, at the beginning of the Second World War, Chanel closed her shops. She said that it was not a time for fashion, but I think that she had more important business in mind.

    During the German Occupation, she lived on at the Hôtel Ritz Paris, where in 1940 she began an affair with Hans Günther von Dincklage, a German officer and spy who was 13 years her junior (although she would only admit to three years difference).

    Chanel was also linked to Walter Kutschmann, an SS man who was assigned to Paris in 1943. Chanel and Kutschmann are said to have made frequent trips together to Spain, and large sums of money passed between them.

    [6]

    Coco Chanel

    Chanel’s most important Nazi contact, however, was SS-Brigadeführer Walter Schellenberg, who rose to become head of foreign intelligence in 1944. According to Wikipedia:

    In 1943, after four years of professional separation, Chanel contacted Lombardi, who was living in Rome. She invited Lombardi to come to Paris and renew their work together. This was actually a cover for “Operation Modellhut,” an attempt by Nazi spymaster Walter Schellenberg to make secret contact with Lombardi’s relative Winston Churchill. When Lombardi refused, she was arrested as a British spy by the Gestapo.

    The aim of Operation Modellhut was to bring about a negotiated end to the war. If it had succeeded, Coco Chanel might have been instrumental in saving millions of lives, and we would probably be living in a very different world.

    Chanel maintained her friendship with Schellenberg after the war. She even paid for his funeral when he died in Turin of cancer in 1952.

    After the war, Chanel was charged as a collaborator, but she was mysteriously released. It is rumored that the British Royal family intervened on her behalf. In 1945, Chanel moved to Switzerland joining Dincklage—they remained together until 1950, her longest relationship. She returned to Paris only in 1954, when she re-launched her fashion career.

    The French panned her first collection, but in England and America, she was bigger than ever. And she never apologized, never explained.

    ...
    (Review Source)
  • New from Counter-Currents! Son of Trevor Lynch’s White Nationalist Guide to the Movies
    (”Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    [1]1,140 words

    Trevor Lynch
    Son of Trevor Lynch’s White Nationalist Guide to the Movies
    Edited by Greg Johnson
    San Francisco: Counter-Currents, 2015
    214 pages

    Kindle E-book: $4.49 [2]

    A print edition will appear shortly, $35 for hardcovers and $18 for paperbacks. 

    Since 2001, Trevor Lynch’s witty, pugnacious, and profound film essays and reviews have developed a wide following among cinephiles and White Nationalists alike. Lynch deals frankly with the anti-white bias and Jewish agenda of many mainstream films, but he is even more interested in discerning positive racial messages and values, sometimes in the most unlikely places.

    Son of Trevor Lynch’s White Nationalist Guide to the Movies is his second collection of essays and reviews, covering 51 movies and 4 television shows, spanning a 14-year period, from his very first review (Mulholland Drive) to his last to date (The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies).

    Lynch offers penetrating and sometimes surprising philosophical readings of Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner, Alejandro Jodorowsky’s The Dance of Reality, the Coen brothers’ A Serious Man, M. Night Shyamalan’s Signs, and Francis Ford Coppola’s Youth Without Youth; sympathetic interpretations of Bollywood musicals and Zhang Yimou’s wuxia movies; and hilarious pans of Atlas Shrugged: Part I, Prometheus, The Hobbit trilogy, The Monuments Men, Machete, Predators, Secretary, Sucker Punch, and other worthy targets.

    Return of Trevor Lynch’s White Nationalist Guide to the Movies cements its author’s status as a leading cultural critic of the North American New Right.

    Contents

    Preface

    1. Agora
    2. Alexander
    3. Arlington Road
    4. Atlas Shrugged: Part I
    5. Blade Runner
    6. Burn Notice
    7. Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky
    8. The Dance of Reality
    9. Die Another Day
    10. 8 Mile
    11. Firefly
    12. Hero
    13. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
    14. The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
    15. The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies
    16. Hooray for Bollywood: Devdas & Kabhi Kushi Kabhie Gham
    17. House of Flying Daggers
    18. The Interpreter
    19. Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
    20. Legally Blonde 2: Red, White & Blonde
    21. Lovecraft: Fear of the Unknown
    22. Machete
    23. Man of Steel
    24. Men in Black II
    25. Minority Report
    26. Moneyball
    27. The Monuments Men
    28. Mulholland Drive
    29. Nebraska
    30. Person of Interest
    31. Predators
    32. Prometheus
    33. Red Dragon
    34. The Road
    35. Secretary
    36. Serenity
    37. A Serious Man
    38. Signs
    39. Spy Kids 2: The Island of Lost Dreams
    40. Star Wars: Episode II—Attack of the Clones
    41. Sucker Punch
    42. The Tourist
    43. Vanilla Sky
    44. Youth Without Youth

    Appendix
    45. Ten Favorite Films

    Index (Print edition only)

    Praise for Trevor Lynch

    “Trevor Lynch provides us with a highly literate, insightful, and even philosophical perspective on film—one that will send you running to the video rental store for a look at some very worthwhile movies—although he is also quite willing to tell you what not to see. He sees movies without the usual blinders. He is quite aware that because Hollywood is controlled by Jews, one must typically analyze movies for their propaganda value in the project of white dispossession. Trevor Lynch’s collection is a must read for anyone attempting to understand the deep undercurrents of the contemporary culture of the West.”

    —Kevin MacDonald, author of The Culture of Critique

    “Hollywood has been deconstructing the white race for nearly a century. Now Trevor Lynch is fighting back, deconstructing Hollywood from a White Nationalist point of view. But these essays are not just of interest to White Nationalists. . . . These essays combine a cultural and philosophical sophistication beyond anything in film studies today with a lucid, accessible, and entertaining prose style. Every serious cineaste needs to read this book.”

    —Edmund Connelly

    “The Hollywood movie may be the greatest vehicle of deception ever invented, and the passive white viewer is its primary target. Yet White Nationalist philosopher and film critic Trevor Lynch demonstrates that truth is to be found even in this unlikeliest of places. If American audiences could learn the kind of critical appreciation Mr. Lynch demonstrates for them, their seductive enemies in Tinseltown wouldn’t stand a chance.”

    —F. Roger Devlin, author of Sexual Utopia in Power

    “This is not some collection of vein-popping rants about Hollywood’s political agendas. It’s a thoughtful and engaging examination of ideas in popular films from a perspective you won’t find in your local newspaper or in Entertainment Weekly. Lynch has chosen films that—in many cases—he actually enjoyed, and playfully teased out the New Right themes that mainstream reviewers can only afford to address with a careful measure of scorn. How many trees have been felled to print all of the Marxist, feminist, minority-pandering ‘critiques’ of contemporary celluloid over the past fifty years? Isn’t it about time we read an explicitly white review of The Fellowship of the Ring, or Traditionalist take on take on The Dark Knight?”

    —Jack Donovan, author of A Sky Without Eagles

    “Hunter Thompson said that Las Vegas was ‘what the whole hep world would be doing Saturday night if the Nazis had won the War.’ Like liberalism, that’s clever but wrong. If the Good Guys had won, we ‘hepsters’ would be at the movies, experiencing the ultimate art form, but made by racially aware white artists, not today’s Hollywood culture-distorters. This book is the next best thing: Trevor Lynch reviews today’s films from an artistically sensitive, culturally informed, but most of all unfailingly pro-white perspective. He doesn’t just warn you away from the obviously bad, but explains how the poison works and where it comes from, and even finds racially uplifting stuff where you’d least expect it—Pulp Fiction? Read it, and you’ll never feel the need to pay good money to be seen weeping at another Holocaust movie again.”

    —James J. O’Meara, author of The Eldritch Evola . . . & Others

    “What I find most remarkable about Trevor Lynch’s writings on film is his ability to use philosophy to illuminate film, and vice-versa, with an intellectual virtuosity and lucidity of style that blows away anything in the vast Open Court and Blackwell series of Philosophy and Popular Culture books.”

    —Jef Costello

    “‘Trevor Lynch’ is not precisely a real person himself. Rather, he is the alter-ego of a tiresome and self-important fellow named Greg Johnson who runs a vastly pretentious website called Counter-Currents.com . . . . Lynch/Johnson . . . might be considered shocking, if only he weren’t such a bore. A consummate nerd and self-described “LOTR [Lord of the Rings] fanatic,” he’s the kind of guy who finds himself at parties at which ‘Pulp Fiction’ is described as a film about ‘greatness of soul at the end of history,’ and who complains as lustily about ‘lowbrow’ appropriation of the term ‘postmodern’ as he does about the supposed Jewish scheme to undermine ‘higher morality’ by putting ‘dangerous truths’ ‘in the mouths of monsters’ like the racist skinheads of ‘American History X’.”

    —Leah Nelson, Southern Poverty Law Center Intelligence Report

    “The most bizarre of the white supremacist titles, though, is Trevor Lynch’s White Nationalist Guide to the Movies. . . . Mr Lynch’s review of summer blockbuster ‘Django Unchained’ calls it ‘another Jewish wet dream’ before saying that ‘hateful fantasies about teaming up with blacks to harm whites are staples of the Jewish imagination.’”

    —Ryan Gorman, The Daily Mail

     

    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Son of Trevor Lynch’s White Nationalist Guide to the Movies
    (”Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    [1]1,161 words

    Trevor Lynch
    Son of Trevor Lynch’s White Nationalist Guide to the Movies [2]
    Edited by Greg Johnson
    San Francisco: Counter-Currents, 2015
    214 pages

    Hardcover: $35 [2]

    Paperback: List price: $20; our price: $18 [2]

    Print copies will ship by March 21, 2015.

    To visit our secure order page, click here [2]

    Since 2001, Trevor Lynch’s witty, pugnacious, and profound film essays and reviews have developed a wide following among cinephiles and White Nationalists alike. Lynch deals frankly with the anti-white bias and Jewish agenda of many mainstream films, but he is even more interested in discerning positive racial messages and values, sometimes in the most unlikely places.

    Son of Trevor Lynch’s White Nationalist Guide to the Movies is his second collection of essays and reviews, covering 51 movies and 4 television shows, spanning a 14-year period, from his very first review (Mulholland Drive) to his last to date (The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies).

    Lynch offers penetrating and sometimes surprising philosophical readings of Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner, Alejandro Jodorowsky’s The Dance of Reality, the Coen brothers’ A Serious Man, M. Night Shyamalan’s Signs, and Francis Ford Coppola’s Youth Without Youth; sympathetic interpretations of Bollywood musicals and Zhang Yimou’s wuxia movies; and hilarious pans of Atlas Shrugged: Part I, Prometheus, The Hobbit trilogy, The Monuments Men, Machete, Predators, Secretary, Sucker Punch, and other worthy targets.

    Return of Trevor Lynch’s White Nationalist Guide to the Movies cements its author’s status as a leading cultural critic of the North American New Right.

    Contents

    Preface

    1. Agora
    2. Alexander
    3. Arlington Road
    4. Atlas Shrugged: Part I
    5. Blade Runner
    6. Burn Notice
    7. Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky
    8. The Dance of Reality
    9. Die Another Day
    10. 8 Mile
    11. Firefly
    12. Hero
    13. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
    14. The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
    15. The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies
    16. Hooray for Bollywood: Devdas & Kabhi Kushi Kabhie Gham
    17. House of Flying Daggers
    18. The Interpreter
    19. Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
    20. Legally Blonde 2: Red, White & Blonde
    21. Lovecraft: Fear of the Unknown
    22. Machete
    23. Man of Steel
    24. Men in Black II
    25. Minority Report
    26. Moneyball
    27. The Monuments Men
    28. Mulholland Drive
    29. Nebraska
    30. Person of Interest
    31. Predators
    32. Prometheus
    33. Red Dragon
    34. The Road
    35. Secretary
    36. Serenity
    37. A Serious Man
    38. Signs
    39. Spy Kids 2: The Island of Lost Dreams
    40. Star Wars: Episode II—Attack of the Clones
    41. Sucker Punch
    42. The Tourist
    43. Vanilla Sky
    44. Youth Without Youth

    Appendix
    45. Ten Favorite Films

    Index (Print edition only)

    Praise for Trevor Lynch

    “Trevor Lynch provides us with a highly literate, insightful, and even philosophical perspective on film—one that will send you running to the video rental store for a look at some very worthwhile movies—although he is also quite willing to tell you what not to see. He sees movies without the usual blinders. He is quite aware that because Hollywood is controlled by Jews, one must typically analyze movies for their propaganda value in the project of white dispossession. Trevor Lynch’s collection is a must read for anyone attempting to understand the deep undercurrents of the contemporary culture of the West.”

    —Kevin MacDonald, author of The Culture of Critique

    “Hollywood has been deconstructing the white race for nearly a century. Now Trevor Lynch is fighting back, deconstructing Hollywood from a White Nationalist point of view. But these essays are not just of interest to White Nationalists. . . . These essays combine a cultural and philosophical sophistication beyond anything in film studies today with a lucid, accessible, and entertaining prose style. Every serious cineaste needs to read this book.”

    —Edmund Connelly

    “The Hollywood movie may be the greatest vehicle of deception ever invented, and the passive white viewer is its primary target. Yet White Nationalist philosopher and film critic Trevor Lynch demonstrates that truth is to be found even in this unlikeliest of places. If American audiences could learn the kind of critical appreciation Mr. Lynch demonstrates for them, their seductive enemies in Tinseltown wouldn’t stand a chance.”

    —F. Roger Devlin, author of Sexual Utopia in Power

    “This is not some collection of vein-popping rants about Hollywood’s political agendas. It’s a thoughtful and engaging examination of ideas in popular films from a perspective you won’t find in your local newspaper or in Entertainment Weekly. Lynch has chosen films that—in many cases—he actually enjoyed, and playfully teased out the New Right themes that mainstream reviewers can only afford to address with a careful measure of scorn. How many trees have been felled to print all of the Marxist, feminist, minority-pandering ‘critiques’ of contemporary celluloid over the past fifty years? Isn’t it about time we read an explicitly white review of The Fellowship of the Ring, or Traditionalist take on take on The Dark Knight?”

    —Jack Donovan, author of A Sky Without Eagles

    “Hunter Thompson said that Las Vegas was ‘what the whole hep world would be doing Saturday night if the Nazis had won the War.’ Like liberalism, that’s clever but wrong. If the Good Guys had won, we ‘hepsters’ would be at the movies, experiencing the ultimate art form, but made by racially aware white artists, not today’s Hollywood culture-distorters. This book is the next best thing: Trevor Lynch reviews today’s films from an artistically sensitive, culturally informed, but most of all unfailingly pro-white perspective. He doesn’t just warn you away from the obviously bad, but explains how the poison works and where it comes from, and even finds racially uplifting stuff where you’d least expect it—Pulp Fiction? Read it, and you’ll never feel the need to pay good money to be seen weeping at another Holocaust movie again.”

    —James J. O’Meara, author of The Eldritch Evola . . . & Others

    “What I find most remarkable about Trevor Lynch’s writings on film is his ability to use philosophy to illuminate film, and vice-versa, with an intellectual virtuosity and lucidity of style that blows away anything in the vast Open Court and Blackwell series of Philosophy and Popular Culture books.”

    —Jef Costello

    “‘Trevor Lynch’ is not precisely a real person himself. Rather, he is the alter-ego of a tiresome and self-important fellow named Greg Johnson who runs a vastly pretentious website called Counter-Currents.com . . . . Lynch/Johnson . . . might be considered shocking, if only he weren’t such a bore. A consummate nerd and self-described “LOTR [Lord of the Rings] fanatic,” he’s the kind of guy who finds himself at parties at which ‘Pulp Fiction’ is described as a film about ‘greatness of soul at the end of history,’ and who complains as lustily about ‘lowbrow’ appropriation of the term ‘postmodern’ as he does about the supposed Jewish scheme to undermine ‘higher morality’ by putting ‘dangerous truths’ ‘in the mouths of monsters’ like the racist skinheads of ‘American History X’.”

    —Leah Nelson, Southern Poverty Law Center Intelligence Report

    “The most bizarre of the white supremacist titles, though, is Trevor Lynch’s White Nationalist Guide to the Movies. . . . Mr Lynch’s review of summer blockbuster ‘Django Unchained’ calls it ‘another Jewish wet dream’ before saying that ‘hateful fantasies about teaming up with blacks to harm whites are staples of the Jewish imagination.’”

    —Ryan Gorman, The Daily Mail

    Hardcover: $35 [2]

    Paperback: List price: $20; our price: $18 [2]

    Print copies will ship by March 21, 2015.

    To visit our secure order page, click here [2].

     

    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Son of Trevor Lynch’s White Nationalist Guide to the Movies
    (”Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    Trevor Lynch
    Son of Trevor Lynch’s White Nationalist Guide to the Movies
    Edited by Greg Johnson
    San Francisco: Counter-Currents, 2015
    214 pages

    Kindle E-book: $4.49 [1]

    Since 2001, Trevor Lynch’s witty, pugnacious, and profound film essays and reviews have developed a wide following among cinephiles and White Nationalists alike. Lynch deals frankly with the anti-white bias and Jewish agenda of many mainstream films, but he is even more interested in discerning positive racial messages and values, sometimes in the most unlikely places.

    Son of Trevor Lynch’s White Nationalist Guide to the Movies is his second collection of essays and reviews, covering 51 movies and 4 television shows, spanning a 14-year period, from his very first review (Mulholland Drive) to his last to date (The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies).

    Lynch offers penetrating and sometimes surprising philosophical readings of Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner, Alejandro Jodorowsky’s The Dance of Reality, the Coen brothers’ A Serious Man, M. Night Shyamalan’s Signs, and Francis Ford Coppola’s Youth Without Youth; sympathetic interpretations of Bollywood musicals and Zhang Yimou’s wuxia movies; and hilarious pans of Atlas Shrugged: Part I, Prometheus, The Hobbit trilogy, The Monuments Men, Machete, Predators, Secretary, Sucker Punch, and other worthy targets.

    Return of Trevor Lynch’s White Nationalist Guide to the Movies cements its author’s status as a leading cultural critic of the North American New Right.

    Contents

    Preface

    1. Agora
    2. Alexander
    3. Arlington Road
    4. Atlas Shrugged: Part I
    5. Blade Runner
    6. Burn Notice
    7. Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky
    8. The Dance of Reality
    9. Die Another Day
    10. 8 Mile
    11. Firefly
    12. Hero
    13. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey
    14. The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug
    15. The Hobbit: The Battle of Five Armies
    16. Hooray for Bollywood: Devdas & Kabhi Kushi Kabhie Gham
    17. House of Flying Daggers
    18. The Interpreter
    19. Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
    20. Legally Blonde 2: Red, White & Blonde
    21. Lovecraft: Fear of the Unknown
    22. Machete
    23. Man of Steel
    24. Men in Black II
    25. Minority Report
    26. Moneyball
    27. The Monuments Men
    28. Mulholland Drive
    29. Nebraska
    30. Person of Interest
    31. Predators
    32. Prometheus
    33. Red Dragon
    34. The Road
    35. Secretary
    36. Serenity
    37. A Serious Man
    38. Signs
    39. Spy Kids 2: The Island of Lost Dreams
    40. Star Wars: Episode II—Attack of the Clones
    41. Sucker Punch
    42. The Tourist
    43. Vanilla Sky
    44. Youth Without Youth

    Appendix
    45. Ten Favorite Films

    Index (Print edition only)

    Praise for Trevor Lynch

    “Trevor Lynch provides us with a highly literate, insightful, and even philosophical perspective on film—one that will send you running to the video rental store for a look at some very worthwhile movies—although he is also quite willing to tell you what not to see. He sees movies without the usual blinders. He is quite aware that because Hollywood is controlled by Jews, one must typically analyze movies for their propaganda value in the project of white dispossession. Trevor Lynch’s collection is a must read for anyone attempting to understand the deep undercurrents of the contemporary culture of the West.”

    —Kevin MacDonald, author of The Culture of Critique

    “Hollywood has been deconstructing the white race for nearly a century. Now Trevor Lynch is fighting back, deconstructing Hollywood from a White Nationalist point of view. But these essays are not just of interest to White Nationalists. . . . These essays combine a cultural and philosophical sophistication beyond anything in film studies today with a lucid, accessible, and entertaining prose style. Every serious cineaste needs to read this book.”

    —Edmund Connelly

    “The Hollywood movie may be the greatest vehicle of deception ever invented, and the passive white viewer is its primary target. Yet White Nationalist philosopher and film critic Trevor Lynch demonstrates that truth is to be found even in this unlikeliest of places. If American audiences could learn the kind of critical appreciation Mr. Lynch demonstrates for them, their seductive enemies in Tinseltown wouldn’t stand a chance.”

    —F. Roger Devlin, author of Sexual Utopia in Power

    “This is not some collection of vein-popping rants about Hollywood’s political agendas. It’s a thoughtful and engaging examination of ideas in popular films from a perspective you won’t find in your local newspaper or in Entertainment Weekly. Lynch has chosen films that—in many cases—he actually enjoyed, and playfully teased out the New Right themes that mainstream reviewers can only afford to address with a careful measure of scorn. How many trees have been felled to print all of the Marxist, feminist, minority-pandering ‘critiques’ of contemporary celluloid over the past fifty years? Isn’t it about time we read an explicitly white review of The Fellowship of the Ring, or Traditionalist take on take on The Dark Knight?”

    —Jack Donovan, author of A Sky Without Eagles

    “Hunter Thompson said that Las Vegas was ‘what the whole hep world would be doing Saturday night if the Nazis had won the War.’ Like liberalism, that’s clever but wrong. If the Good Guys had won, we ‘hepsters’ would be at the movies, experiencing the ultimate art form, but made by racially aware white artists, not today’s Hollywood culture-distorters. This book is the next best thing: Trevor Lynch reviews today’s films from an artistically sensitive, culturally informed, but most of all unfailingly pro-white perspective. He doesn’t just warn you away from the obviously bad, but explains how the poison works and where it comes from, and even finds racially uplifting stuff where you’d least expect it—Pulp Fiction? Read it, and you’ll never feel the need to pay good money to be seen weeping at another Holocaust movie again.”

    —James J. O’Meara, author of The Eldritch Evola . . . & Others

    “What I find most remarkable about Trevor Lynch’s writings on film is his ability to use philosophy to illuminate film, and vice-versa, with an intellectual virtuosity and lucidity of style that blows away anything in the vast Open Court and Blackwell series of Philosophy and Popular Culture books.”

    —Jef Costello

    “‘Trevor Lynch’ is not precisely a real person himself. Rather, he is the alter-ego of a tiresome and self-important fellow named Greg Johnson who runs a vastly pretentious website called Counter-Currents.com . . . . Lynch/Johnson . . . might be considered shocking, if only he weren’t such a bore. A consummate nerd and self-described “LOTR [Lord of the Rings] fanatic,” he’s the kind of guy who finds himself at parties at which ‘Pulp Fiction’ is described as a film about ‘greatness of soul at the end of history,’ and who complains as lustily about ‘lowbrow’ appropriation of the term ‘postmodern’ as he does about the supposed Jewish scheme to undermine ‘higher morality’ by putting ‘dangerous truths’ ‘in the mouths of monsters’ like the racist skinheads of ‘American History X’.”

    —Leah Nelson, Southern Poverty Law Center Intelligence Report

    “The most bizarre of the white supremacist titles, though, is Trevor Lynch’s White Nationalist Guide to the Movies. . . . Mr Lynch’s review of summer blockbuster ‘Django Unchained’ calls it ‘another Jewish wet dream’ before saying that ‘hateful fantasies about teaming up with blacks to harm whites are staples of the Jewish imagination.’”

    —Ryan Gorman, The Daily Mail

    ...
    (Review Source)

Kyle Smith1
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Review: "Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky"
    The costume drama about a love affair between two alleged path-breaking geniuses, “Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky” was long on decor and short on feeling. My review is up.]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

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