Captain America: The Winter Soldier

Not rated yet!
Director
Joe Russo, Anthony Russo
Runtime
2 h 16 min
Release Date
20 March 2014
Genres
Action, Adventure, Science Fiction
Overview
After the cataclysmic events in New York with The Avengers, Steve Rogers, aka Captain America is living quietly in Washington, D.C. and trying to adjust to the modern world. But when a S.H.I.E.L.D. colleague comes under attack, Steve becomes embroiled in a web of intrigue that threatens to put the world at risk. Joining forces with the Black Widow, Captain America struggles to expose the ever-widening conspiracy while fighting off professional assassins sent to silence him at every turn. When the full scope of the villainous plot is revealed, Captain America and the Black Widow enlist the help of a new ally, the Falcon. However, they soon find themselves up against an unexpected and formidable enemy—the Winter Soldier.
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PJ Media Staff5
PJ Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • PJTV's Trifecta Goes to the Movies: Libertarian Themes Hit the Screen in Captain America & Divergent
    PJ Media var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Trifecta Goes to the Movies: Libertarian Themes Hit the Screen in Captain America & Divergent', 'videoType': 'Original' }); In this three part series, Trifecta reviews the latest movies and notices some new themes emerging on the silver screen. In part one, Trifecta reviews Captain America: The Winter Soldier, in addition to Divergent. The gang notices distinct libertarian themes in both films and wonders whether these movies are a direct response to President Obama's overreaching agenda.PJTV subscribers click here to watch; an embeddable YouTube version is also available. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/blog/trifecta-goes-to-the-movies/ ]]>
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  • 4 Reasons Why You Should See Captain America: The Winter Soldier
    Lifestyle var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Marvel's Captain America: The Winter Soldier - Trailer 2 (OFFICIAL)', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); Marvel's Captain America was one of the best superhero movies of the last decade, featuring an engaging Chris Evans as the 98-pound weakling who is transformed into a WW II fighting machine and, at the end, wakes up from a long nap to discover himself in contemporary America. The second go-round, Captain America: The Winter Soldier is nearly as much fun as the original, with a delightfully tangled plot, plenty of well-staged action scenes and a superb cast given reams of smart dialogue. Here are four reasons to salute Cap again.1. The complexity.Comic-book movies sometimes leave the impression that the writers are in a huge hurry to get from one action scene to the next, without worrying too much about what comes in between. The Winter Soldier, though, has enough plot for three movies, with a complicated back story gradually emerging about a nefarious historical plot reminiscent of that of the League of Shadows in the Dark Knight movies.A legendary figure called "the Winter Soldier" is blamed for a rash of mysterious assassinations occurring over a long period of time, and though Cap derides the tale as a ghost story, he learns that the truth has much to do with his own personal history, dating back decades. Meanwhile, Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) has a much bigger part to play than in any previous film, as does Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson), yet there’s also room to launch a new hero, Falcon (Anthony Mackie, who has an easygoing, likeable-yet-confident vibe that recalls the young Will Smith). class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2014/4/4/captain-america-winter-soldier/ previous Page 1 of 4 next   ]]>
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  • Three Days of the Captain
    Ed Driscoll Captain America: The Winter Soldier is reviewed by John Podhoretz in the Weekly Standard:Captain America, newly freed from the block of ice in which he has been frozen since the end of the war, must now deal with his failure to rid the world of the Nazi threat. As one character asks him, “How does it feel to know you died for nothing?”That’s quite an interesting message for a superhero movie. Since coming into existence as a genre of its own with Superman in 1978, the comic-book movie has served as the successor to the classic Western—a moral pageant in which a classic white-hatted hero faces off against a black-hatted villain who has upset the moral order. The white hat sets things right and then rides off to do more good deeds.In the late 1940s, after a generation in which more westerns were made than any other kind of movie in Hollywood by a factor of two, directors and writers began to tire of the formula and looked to broaden it. They made villains out of characters who would have once been heroes, like Henry Fonda’s martinet officer in Fort Apache (1948). And they made heroes out of former villains, like the Indian warrior Cochise in Broken Arrow (1950).The superhero movie is Hollywood’s dominant fare. And now its makers—in this case, the gentlemen behind Marvel Studios, the Disney-owned behemoth—have had enough, in the same way that John Ford and Howard Hawks and other western-makers had had enough by the late 1940s. Those men incorporated liberal themes like tolerance and a more complex view of the uses of violence. In keeping with the more radical tenor of our times, Marvel Studios has bypassed that kind of mushy liberalism and gone straight to far-left radicalism.Meanwhile at National Review, Armond White notes that the film's title isn't likely a coincidence, given that "in today’s Hollywood the idea of an honest, uncomplicated fighting soldier is more foreign than a Prius:"This fact makes the latest installment of Marvel’s Captain America franchise oddly insincere and unconvincing. It vitiates that sometimes disingenuous phrase “I support the troops.” Instead, the film’s subtitle recalls the 1972 documentary Winter Soldier, in which Vietnam veterans repented their battlefield violence. Such disillusionment now infects even a comic-book franchise, so that the Captain America idea stops short of nationalist fervor. As Rogers takes his daily superhuman run around the basin of Washington, D.C., he introduces himself to another morning runner (and us) with the repeated look-out phrase “On your left . . .” Not a coincidence.Through modish reinvention, Captain America — a dated, sanctimonious brawler-innocent — represents the undeniable fantasy of a particular political perspective. Leaning to the left, he prevails over internal threats to U.S. security (in the form of a neo-Nazi underground called Hydra, whose members include a senator and a State Department honcho played by Robert Redford). Yet the motivation for his intrepidness isn’t deep; it lacks a certain conviction. The fanboy audience (including adults), which has more dedication to the comic-book genre than to the Selective Service, may cheer him on with hollow enthusiasm while falling for Hollywood’s imaginary patriotism. Ignoring the complexities of realpolitik, moviegoers respond to formulaic CGI action scenes as if saluting the flag.Whenever I hear the words "Winter Soldier," I immediately think of the 2004-era Website that illustrated the radical timeline of John Kerry in the 1970s; and to add to the '70s paranoia atmosphere of the film, Robert Redford, matinee idol turned star of such paranoid '70s potboilers such as Three Days of the Condor and All the President's Men has a supporting role.Which also reflects Podhoretz's take that the superhero movie has become "Hollywood’s dominant fare" in much the same way that westerns were in the 1940s and '50s. Marvel gets a name that adds cache on the film poster; Redford gets a pop culture boost in the wintery twilight of his own career. It's a well-timed one to boot, after The Company You Keep, his disastrous brush with radical chic last year, which in the same sort of macabre synchronicity that Bill Ayers could appreciate, promoted the Pentagon-bombing Weathermen just in time to coincide with the Boston Marathon bombing Tsarnaev brothers.By the way, the question asked of the Captain regarding his service in World War II, “How does it feel to know you died for nothing?” also seems like yet another attempt by Hollywood to reduce World War II down to meaningless nihilism.Which seems a particularly odd and depressing turn for the Hollywood superhero genre.For a more positive take on Captain America: The Winter Soldier, check out the latest edition of PJTVs Trifecta, with my friends Steve Green, Bill Whittle, and Scott Ott: var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Trifecta Goes to the Movies: Libertarian Themes Hit the Screen in Captain America & Divergent', 'videoType': 'Original' }); class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/eddriscoll/2014/4/12/three-days-of-the-captain/ ]]>
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  • 7 Good Things and 8 Bad Things About the New Avengers Trailer
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Marvel's "Avengers: Age of Ultron" - Teaser Trailer (OFFICIAL)', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); Anticipation following the first Avengers movie was so thick you could cut it with a knife.That anticipation was dimmed somewhat when it was learned that Thanos, who appeared for all but two seconds at the very end, was not slated as the villain for Avengers 2. Instead, he appeared next in the surprise blockbuster Guardians of the Galaxy helping to underscore one of the exciting things about Marvel Studios films (as opposed to Marvel films from other studios): their interconnectivity, the ingredient that catapulted tiny Marvel Comics ahead of giant competitor DC Comics in the early 1960s.Where will Thanos appear next? Who can tell?The point is, the Marvel movie universe isn't dependent on any single ingredient. Not Thanos, not Tony Stark, not Captain America, not SHIELD. Something to keep in mind as Avengers 2 rolls around along with rumors that major characters (driven by the expiration of standing contracts of the actors who play them) are soon to fall by the wayside.Tony Stark may go off into the sunset, Cap may be killed off, Thor may end up in Valhalla leading to a possible reorganized and reconstituted Avengers team much like the epochal events that took place in Avengers #16 when Iron Man, Giant-Man, and Thor quit and were replaced by Hawkeye, Quicksilver, and the Scarlet Witch, the latter two perhaps not coincidentally, set to be introduced in Avengers 2.Which brings us to the new, recently released Avengers 2 trailer which, if it accurately presages the events in the film, raises the bar as well as the stakes for the new film, one that promises to meet if not exceed the colossal earnings of the first.With so much riding on the new film, not least of which is the expectation that its content tops the first, the trailer hints at less than perfection. Yeah, there seems to be plenty to like in the sample footage, but there's also stuff that makes discerning viewers stop and wonder. Thus, in the interests of keeping fans fully informed (in no particular order) here are some reasons why they should look forward to Avengers 2 as well as a few to inspire doubt. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2014/10/29/7-good-things-and-8-bad-things-about-the-new-avengers-trailer/ previous Page 1 of 16 next   ]]>
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Ben Davies1
Rebel Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Captain America’s Chris Evans starts anti-Trump website. So what? | Ben Davies
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Plugged In3
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Captain America: The Winter Soldier
    DramaAction/AdventureSci-Fi/Fantasy We hope this review was both interesting and useful. Please share it with family and friends who would benefit from it as well.Movie ReviewThe enemies were obvious when Steve Rogers became Captain America. It was easier to be a good guy. Staring down Hitler or tangling with Hydra has a way of distilling right and wrong. But the clear colors of Cap's youth are muddied now; heroes and villains braid and blend. S.H.I.E.L.D., the organization for which Cap works, slinks and spies and cheats and lies—albeit, boss Nick Fury says, for the best of reasons. Sure, it still employs guys like Cap, but it also relies on the likes Natasha Romanov—full-time ruthless agent, onetime enemy assassin, overtime liar and hardly the stuff role models are made of. And when Cap and Natasha are sent to pry a S.H.I.E.L.D. boat free from pirates, Cap learns that his partner's been given an altogether different—and decidedly underhanded—mission. When Cap asks Fury later why he wasn't told about Natasha's real job, the S.H.I.E.L.D. leader says he knew Cap wouldn't be comfortable with it. "Agent Romanov is comfortable with everything," Fury says. But there are lines Fury won't cross. When he finds that he's locked out of some super-secret S.H.I.E.L.D. files, he grows uneasy. When cop-dressed bad 'uns try to assassinate him, he grows worried. And when he's almost killed by a strange masked man with a metallic arm, he turns to the only man he can think to trust: Cap. He tells our hero that S.H.I.E.L.D. has been compromised. That there's a rot within. That ol' Cap is the guy to clean it out. But is he? Cap wonders. The good Captain is at his best when the battle lines are clear—when he can fling his shield at card-carrying villains and fight for truth, justice and the American way. But in this strange new guerilla war, where friends may be enemies and there's no one to trust, where does Cap aim?Positive ElementsAntiheroes rule even in superhero-filled universes. Iron Man preens, Batman broods and Bruce Banner's only superpower stems from some serious anger management issues. Even in the caped-crusader set we find few role models we dare to always emulate. Captain America is one of them, though, and he does very little to tarnish his reputation in The Winter Soldier. Yeah, Cap's in a weird place, career-wise. He confesses to a friend that, all his life, he always wanted to do what's right. But with his good-guy organization doing so many questionable things, he admits, "I guess I'm not quite sure what that is anymore." When Fury unveils an array of S.H.I.E.L.D. supermachines meant to snuff out crime (and criminals) even preemptively, Cap says, "I thought the punishment usually came after the crime." But when he learns that S.H.I.E.L.D. has been infiltrated by the worst of enemies, Cap's unerring moral compass does make him the perfect guy to deal with the crisis—the one incorruptible cog in a now corrupt machine. He's not perfectly pure; I should say that here after the buildup I've given him. But Cap does his best. When circumstances dictate that he and Natasha swipe a car, for instance, he reminds her they're only borrowing it; she should keep her feet off the dash. When Natasha asks Cap to be honest with her and say whether he trusts her, Cap answers, "I would now. And I'm always honest." Cap gets some help in his crusade, of course. Natasha, as duplicitous as she is, sacrifices a great deal to help the hero do his thing, including revealing her own sordid secrets to the world (at great personal harm). Sam, a new friend, flies into the action too, risking his own personal safety. Note that Cap tries to save even the bad guys, and he's rewarded in a pretty unique and important way for following that righteous instinct. (I'll refrain from sharing the details for spoiler reasons.) And even as he's pummeled by a baddie who should be his buddy, Cap quotes a nostalgic line: "I'm with you 'til the end of the line."Spiritual ContentA tombstone is engraved with "Ezekiel 25:17" and "The path of the righteous man," a sideways nod to a Samuel L. Jackson quote in Pulp Fiction. We see a bust of Buddha. In a movie postscript, someone calls this current age "the age of miracles."Sexual ContentWhen Cap and Nat go undercover, she suggests he kiss her passionately in a crowded mall (thus hiding from hunters). He doesn't like public displays of affection, but goes ahead for the sake of the mission. "Still uncomfortable?" she asks. "Not the word I would use," he answers. Later, Natasha asks if that was the first time he's kissed someone since he was unthawed. "I'm 95, not dead," Cap tells her. Later, Natasha shows Cap a scar on her belly, where she was shot. "Bye-bye, bikinis," she says. "Yeah, I bet you look terrible in them now," Cap says. And, indeed, both men and women are fond of wearing tight-fitting outfits that accentuate their physical attributes. A politician talks about a young reporter he'd like to sleep with.Recommended ResourceA Chicken's Guide to Talking Turkey With Your Kids About SexKevin LemanEven the bravest parents feel timid about discussing sex with their 8- to 14-year-olds! This resource offers reassuring, humorous, real-life anecdotes along with reliable information to help you with this challenging task.Buy NowViolent ContentThe Winter Soldier is a harsher, sometimes bloodier movie than The First Avenger, with near-constant action-violence. Captain America, obviously, tangles with dozens of bad guys. Some he mows down in quick succession—taking them out with a fling of his shield (which we see strike with painful realism) or pushing them off ship decks to fall into the ocean. Others take more effort, and fights can be filled with punches, kicks, flying leaps and knockout smacks. Cap suffers more than bumps and bruises too: He's repeatedly shocked with strange Taser-like devices, shot several times, stabbed in the shoulder and outright brutalized in one hard-to-watch showdown. Scads of people are hit, kicked, shot, stabbed, thwacked with heavy objects and caught in explosions. Huge warships fire on each other and crash into buildings. We see stitched up wounds and bloody abrasions. Limbs are broken. Someone gets grotesquely skewered in the hand. Cars, trucks and planes crash. Elevators fall. Natasha guns down several people, lassos one unfortunate man around the neck and pushes a guy off a high building (to scare him). Innocent cleaning women are gunned down in cold blood. Not-so-innocent bigwigs are electrocuted/burned to death by their own deadly devices. A building collapses on top of folks. An occupied and bulletproof SUV is shot at so many times it looks like a motorized block of Swiss cheese. Some guy is thrown in a car and smashed by a truck. We hear that the Winter Soldier has been behind more than two-dozen assassinations in the last 50 years. And S.H.I.E.L.D. is being used to try to eradicate millions of people. Crude or Profane LanguageTwo s-words. One, two or three each of "a‑‑," "b‑‑ch," "d‑‑n" and "h‑‑‑." God's name is misused once or twice.Drug and Alcohol ContentGlasses of champagne are present at a meeting, and guests are encouraged to drink. (One man instead throws his glass and breaks it on a table.)Other Negative ElementsCap tries to lie. (He's unsuccessful.)ConclusionOne of the thrills of the first Captain America movie is its sense of innocence. Oh, it's violent, of course. Name a superhero movie that isn't. But Cap himself is a conscious throwback to a different sort of hero—a guy from the Greatest Generation who fit his times and embraces his role as role model. He's old-fashioned in the best of ways. But if Cap hasn't changed much, the times have, and that makes The Winter Soldier a darker, colder movie. We see not just heroism here, but the bloody cost of war and the dark duplicity sometimes involved in it. Sam counsels soldiers on how to get through post-traumatic stress disorder. Cap admits that even his Greatest Generation wasn't always so great, and that he saw things in battle he wishes he could forget. The plot can take on political overtones too: S.H.I.E.L.D.'s subterfuge and overreach will draw comparisons with the NSA's recent dabblings in domestic spying. Its ethos of preemptive justice will remind viewers of the controversial aspects of the War on Terror. And when S.H.I.E.L.D.'s secrets are downloaded to the Internet (in keeping, it would seem, with Cap's look-you-in-the-eye, there-are-no-secrets-here persona), a few moviegoers may think of Edward Snowden's leaking of classified government documents. Cap asks the same questions some Americans are asking: Are we the good guys? And how do we know? After the rollicking (if explosion-filled) fun of The Avengers and the extraterrestrial humor of Thor: The Dark World, The Winter Soldier thunders into a bleaker, murkier place. It's telling, though, that for the movie's climactic fight, Captain America swipes his old World War II-era uniform from the Smithsonian and dons it for battle. Forget the murk and uncertainty: Cap wants to be a red-white-and-blue hero. And he's left standing in the end—standing for everything he is, perhaps everything we'd want to be. It's hard to be good in his world, just as it's hard to be good in ours. Our lives are filled with complications and complexities. We know the issues aren't as simple as we'd like them to be. But even so, Cap shows us that following your moral compass never goes out of style. We can find justice if we're willing to pursue it. We can show compassion if we're strong enough to allow it.Pro-social ContentObjectionable ContentSummary AdvisoryPlot SummaryChristian BeliefsOther Belief SystemsAuthority RolesProfanity/ViolenceKissing/Sex/HomosexualityDiscussion TopicsAdditional Comments/NotesEpisode Reviews]]>
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  • How Stan Lee Changed the World
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    As you’ve probably heard by now, Stan Lee died yesterday at the age of 95. Many have eulogized Lee as a “comics legend,” and that’s wholly fair. As a writer, editor, publisher and eventually chairman of Marvel Comics, he created or co-created some of the world’s most famous superheroes and helped redefine the genre itself. […]

    The post How Stan Lee Changed the World appeared first on Plugged In Blog.

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  • The Avengers Get Judge-mental
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Warm up the cash registers and credit card swipe machines. The Avengers: Age of Ultron will roar into theaters this Friday, and I think its weekend will look a little like founding member Hulk: big and green. I’m eagerly awaiting Adam Holz’s review on Marvel’s latest blockbuster (it’ll land on the site later tonight). But in the meantime, I thought I’d offer some preliminary thoughts on the Avengers—particularly how their exploits contain, for me, just a whiff of the Old Testament. Now, I’ve written a lot about superheroes here and elsewhere over the years, and in my new book, Burning Bush 2.0: How Pop Culture Replaced the Prophet, I spend a chapter talking about how superheroes follow a divine call a little like we all do. They (and we) are chosen for special work. But they (and we) must also choose to follow our call. For us, I think the critical element here is our choice—the thing we control. (You can read an excerpt from the book on that very topic here.) But the original calling is just as important. And it occurs to me that there’s something a little Judge-y about our favorite Avengers. That is, their fictional roles remind me a little of what we read about in the book of Judges. If you cruise through Judges, you’ll see a couple of recurring themes. One, the Israelites do something really dumb, so God punishes them. Two, the Israelites call out to God for help, so God sends them a deliverer—someone specifically called to save the Israelites from their own self-made problems. When you look at the Avengers (Captain America, Hulk, Iron Man, Thor, Black Widow, Hawkeye), they too seem “built” to deliver the world from some truly dastardly threats. Each time a massive enemy rises up to put the screws on humankind’s collective thumb, some guy in a cape or metal suit pops up to save the day. Hydra Nazis in Europe? Thanks, Captain America. Gigantic metallic beastie in New Mexico? Why, hello, Thor. Alien invaders from above? Hey, why doesn’t the whole team band together to take ’em on? But the comparison goes a step deeper than just the biblical idea of an Old Testament champion rising to save the day. Just as the Israelites were the authors of their own problems, we see that same dynamic in many of our Avenger-centric superhero stories. Take the first Iron Man movie, for instance:  Tony Stark creates his super suit to combat evil elements found within his own arms manufacturing company. In Captain America: The Winter Soldier, we learn that Hydra has wormed its way into S.H.I.E.L.D., which had previously been the good guys. In the original Thor and The Avengers, Thor’s brother Loki is the primary bad ‘un, and he successfully manipulated power brokers on Asgard and on Earth to further his evil plans. And we all know that Hulk is his own worst monster. In each case, our heroes fight evil extraordinarily close to home—evil that often, in some small way, they helped create or foster. We see elements of that in this trailer for Age of Ultron, too: “Everyone creates the thing they dread,” Ultron solemnly intones. Tony, it’s suggested, created Ultron. And now he and his friends must stop it. It’s interesting that, so often in these cinematic superhero stories, we manufacture our own problems, just as we often do in real life. But we find hope in these stories, too. Hope that a deliverer (or, in Age of Ultron’s case, several) might come to help us out. ]]>
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Jay Dyer3
Esoteric Hollywood



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

⚠️ 𝐄𝐃𝐆𝐘 🔥 𝐂𝐎𝐍𝐓𝐄𝐍𝐓 🔥 𝐖𝐀𝐑𝐍𝐈𝐍𝐆 🔥 (𝐍𝐒𝐅𝐖?) ⚠️

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  • Captain America 2: Winter...


    By: Jay The new Captain America film is heavily laced with either revelation of the method programming, or genuine artistic rebellion against the corrupt, globalist establishment.  The plot is...

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  • The Avengers (2012) –...
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)


    By: Jay Dyer Taking it’s place as one of the highest grossing films of all time, the mythmakers of modernity at Marvel gave the world a fairly immense dose of...

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  • Avengers: Age of Ultron –...
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)


    By: Jay Dyer Joss Whedon’s follow-up to The Avengers, Avengers: Age of Ultron, is setting new box office records for Marvel, and has roughly the same degree of critical response...

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Debbie Schlussel1
The New York Post



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Wknd Box Office: Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Jinn (Mich Tax-Funded Muslim Propaganda), Goodbye World
    Blog Posts Movie Reviews Goodbye World“: What an incredible waste of 1.5 hours of my life I’ll never get back. Several uppity hipsters who went to college together end up at a country home where a few of them live. Some of them are married. While they are there, the world is in an apocalyptic state because one of these pretentious, lefty hipsters accidentally sets off the other’s virus. The world has lost electrical power and internet service and total chaos has erupted. But then all of these hipster frauds, after yelling at each other and engaging in unnecessary melodrama, agree to work together and live in peace and harmony. The end. This could have been an interesting movie. Instead, it was total garbage and incredibly stupid, not to mention the worst apocalyptic movie I’ve seen yet. One character even talks to a stuffed animal. Not kidding. By the way, the Black character has a very obviously Jewish name and surname. Not sure why. One other thing: even though the apocalypse has hit America, Obama is, sadly, still President in this movie. Skip this at all cost. FOUR MARXES PLUS FOUR OBAMAS ]]>
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The American Conservative Staff2
The American Conservative



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Captain America Skips Politics, Stays Personal
    Culture Terrorism This review contains spoilers for Captain America: The Winter Soldier. Kevin Feige, the mastermind behind Marvel’s movies, said that Captain America: The Winter Soldier was a chance to expand the range of comic book movies, since the sequel would really be “a ’70s political thriller masquerading as a big superhero movie.” But, despite the clear references to the overreach of the NSA’s surveillance state and the CIA’s unauthorized abuses, little in the movie treated man (or superman) as a political animal. Although Captain America/Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) is warned by S.H.I.E.L.D. director Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) that he should trust no one, the movie never forces the squeaky-clear hero into the same kind of suspicious attitude that characterizes his enemies. The grand conspiracy isn’t revealed through an act of deduction or infiltration, but through the monologue of a very accommodating villain. When the organization that Rogers has served turns out to be tainted, there’s no attempt at investigation or truth and reconciliation. The heroes just leak all the classified files and disband S.H.I.E.L.D. altogether. And, when they infiltrate the base of their erstwhile allies, Captain America has a very simple heuristic for distinguishing friend from foe: Falcon: How do we tell the good guys from the bad guys? Captain America: If they’re shooting at you, they’re bad! Charlie Jane Anders, reviewing the film for io9, argued that Captain America’s greatest power isn’t his superstrength or his shield, but his certainty. [Y]ou reach a point where you realize that’s Captain America’s true superpower — he makes things simpler, for everybody. Everybody else in the movie changes, at least in part because of their connection to Steve Rogers. He’s a catalyst, as well as a leader. This film is simplistic because Steve Rogers’ worldview is simplistic. And if you only let him, Steve Rogers will allow you to live in his world where everything is black and white. Usually, when Americans are characterized as thinking in black and white, it’s because we’ve divided the world or just our nation into “us” and “them” and are out to get rid of them as in President Bush’s statement, “Either you are with us, or you are with the terrorists.”  But when Captain America divides the world into light and dark, he has more in common with John Winthrop, who referenced Matthew 5:14 to tell his fellow colonists that the eyes of the world are upon them, and they must shine out, as a city on a hill. The forceful optimism that Captain America exemplifies is most moving when the stakes of the movie get lower. When Captain America faces his childhood friend Bucky Barnes, who has been transformed into the robotic Winter Soldier, he offer Barnes his weakness, not his strength. Rogers drops his shield and stops putting up a fight. He’s asking his friend to show mercy, instead of removing the choice, and it’s easy to for the audience to hear echoes of a Martin Luther King Jr. sermon, “I love you. I would rather die than hate you.” That makes it all the stranger that, in order to make his way to Barnes, Captain America punches his way through approximately fifty mooks. Maybe he was carefully doing non-lethal damage, but, more likely, the film didn’t expect us to care, since it had already told us that all of Rogers’s antagonists were fanatics and Nazi-collaborators. There were limits to the movie’s mercies. But Winter Soldier would have been a stronger film if it had taken a lesson from a different blockbuster franchise and admitted that “the world isn’t split into good people and Death Eaters.” In order to be a political thriller, instead of an interpersonal one, we need to see how Cap’s idealism scales up. What are the limitations on charity and compassion when it’s expressed through an institution, instead of an individual? What sacrifices can Rogers choose for himself, but not the nation? The Winter Soldier, with its simplistic plot, doesn’t have any serious critique of American policy, but Steve Rogers still offers a powerful call to small-scale heroism to the American people. Follow @leahlibresco// ...
    (Review Source)
  • The Ideological Clash at the Heart of Black Panther | The ...
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    The Ideological Clash at the Heart of Black Panther Far more than globalist propaganda, the movie tackles tough issues of race, place, and culture.

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John Hanlon3
John Hanlon Reviews



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Captain America: Winter Soldier
    Despite its noble intentions, treat I was disappointed in Captain America: The First Avenger, which burst into theaters in 2011— long before Marvel had finished its first phase of big-budget Avengers films. The movie suffered from a lifelessness...
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  • Oscar Nominations 2015
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The second trailer for Avengers: Age of Ultron arrived last night during the championship game and it was even better than the original one. Check it out below. The highly-anticipated sequel arrives in theaters May 1st.. Best motion picture of the year “American...
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  • Kenneth Branagh talks Cinderella & Shakespeare
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Want to know who is cleaning up at the 2015 Academy Awards. I’ll be live-tweeting the show @johnhanlon and keeping score of the winners below. All of the winners will be in bold as the night progresses. Best motion picture of the year “American Sniper” “Birdman or...
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Morgoth1
Morgoth's Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

⚠️ EDGY 🔥 CONTENT 🔥 WARNING 🔥 (NSFW?) ⚠️

🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻


  • Captain America vs Alex Jones New World Order Conspiracy
    Nationalism, Hollywood, Movies, Multiculturalism, Morgoth, Propaganda, Politics, Multiculturalism, Cultural Marxism, Political Correctness
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Dave Cullen1
Computing Forever



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Avengers: Endgame Ending Has a Massive Plot Hole (Spoilers)
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
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Society Reviews3
Society Reviews



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The First Purge Review
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    The First Purge is the mental breakdown of a Marxist Hollywood screenwriter pandering to the “Literally Hitler” crowd because Hillary Clinton lost the election two years ago. If you were looking answers to long-asked questions or even an expansion of the plot, you’ll probably never get it after this film earns the lowest opening gross at the box office in the entire franchise’s history. I wonder why?

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  • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 Review
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    If I did ½ star ratings, this film would be closer to a 2.5 because there is good here and you will probably still enjoy as a popcorn film. Guardians of the Galaxy Vol 2 tries to score too many points on what people liked in the first movie but instead produces a mediocre sequel which is the norm now for Disney’s MCU.

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  • Doctor Strange Review
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    Doctor Strange gets an A for concept and visuals, but the story is essentially a Batman Begins origin with Magic added in the mix.

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John Podhoretz2
Commentary Magazine



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Marvel Does Bond
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    JOHN PODHORETZ

    Black Panther is the least superhero-y of the Marvel superhero movies. T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman), its protagonist, gets some unearthly abilities from drinking the juice of a plant, but I can’t tell you what they are really, and the movie is delightfully uninterested in exploring them.

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  • Comic Opera
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Offering an opinion of Avengers: Age of Ultron is like reviewing Chex Mix. According to what stand-ard should one judge this mixture of breakfast cereal and pretzels and croutons and salt? Even if you find it bland or uninteresting you’ll probably have a few handfuls anyway. And if you love it, you love it uncritically and unreservedly—until, perhaps, you eat too much of it and then feel a little sick. The point is that it would never occur to you to come up with a defense of Chex Mix, an
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The Federalist Staff8
The Federalist



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Sorry, #TeamIronMan, But Government Shouldn't Boss Superheroes Around
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    In the Washington Post, Sonny Bunch struggles to make the case for #TeamIronMan given “Captain America: Civil War,” while missing the factual evidence shown in the movies. “Civil War” is essentially the culmination of this latest round of Marvel movies: “Iron Man 3,” “Thor 2,” “Captain America: The Winter Soldier,” “Ant-Man,” and “Avengers 2” (while that last adds to the reasons Bunch is wrong, is an utterly awful waste of two hours and however millions of dollars). “Civil War” is loosely based on a post-9/11 Marvel event comic of the same name that a recent re-reading shows is, to be generous, quite thin and its political content overblown. Captain America fights government regulation of super-powered individuals because “Masked heroes have been a part of this country for as long as anyone can remember.” That’s Captain America’s first argument. The general gist of the story is this: Tony Stark is enforcing a registration act for all super-powered people, and if they don’t register they get thrown in jail. Captain America disagrees, and they fight. The book closes with a cheesy scene where average New Yorkers jump in the middle of the fight and Captain America says “Oh, man, look we’re just fighting” and surrenders. Truly, the only one who stays ideologically consistent throughout the book is the Punisher, who joins up because Iron Man hires known supervillains to track down un-registered heroes. Then Captain America kicks the Punisher out when he does the thing he said he wanted to do. Message: Government Can’t Handle Anything All this preamble aside, the movie deals with some better inciting incidents and clearer motivations for the characters than the comics do (because the movies only have to deal with 11 movies’ worth of continuity rather than something like 60 years). Anyone on #TeamIronMan is missing that, without the Avengers’ actions—the actions of an outside-of-government group—the events in the various movies would have been far more catastrophic. The only real conclusion to draw from the past string of Marvel movies, in sharp contrast to those from the books, is that the government is a genuinely ineffective machine incapable of handling problems. Without the Avengers’ actions—the actions of an outside-of-government group—the events in the various movies would have been far more catastrophic. Consider the events of the first Avengers movie. The solution of the “World Council,” which is effectively a United Nations stand-in, is to nuke Manhattan. This would have done two things: one, nuked Manhattan and killed everyone there and, two, not stopped the invasion because, you know, massive portal in the sky spewing out aliens. So chalk one up for individual action. In “Captain America: Winter Soldier,” SHIELD is discovered to be under the thumb of the evil criminal organization HYDRA. Their director (Robert Redford) is a HYDRA agent who used government funds to build a fleet of helicarriers to spy on civilians around the country then quickly execute them. This was literally paid for by government and the World Council that wants to hand down orders to Captain America, insisting he must only act under their authority. Captain America uses his brain and some teamwork to take down the helicarriers before they can mass execute. Again, government fails completely and utterly. Individuals taking action save the day once again. In “Avengers 2,” Tony Stark in his infinite wisdom creates a crazed artificial intelligence that tries to destroy the world. The whole registry controversy should almost exclusively be aimed at Stark, because in every single one of his movies, including “Avengers 2,” he basically fights a guy who uses Stark’s technology for evil. Maybe if Tony kept his own devices in check “Avengers 2” wouldn’t have happened and neither the fictional country of Sokovia nor the actual viewers who watched that movie would have suffered. Stark is suffering from guilt due to his own ego and stupidity, and uses that to attempt to place his associates under government control. Comic Depictions Versus Movie Depictions Bunch rightly points out that the United Nations is hardly a force that in reality should be bossing around a group like the Avengers, because even in real life they’re rather incompetent. Give them the Avengers, and they’ll likely just be repurposed to provide security for all the private jets flown to UN green summits. “Batman v Superman” briefly attempted to address this fundamental question of how would—or could—current states actually deal with super-powered vigilantes. It’s a theme that’s part of many of the most revered comics: “The Dark Knight Returns,” “Strikes Again,” “Master Race,” “Watchmen,” “Kingdom Come.” It’s a theme that, ironically, DC gets right in its comics but can’t figure out on-screen, while Marvel can’t do it in comics very well but blows DC’s screen attempt out of the water. It’s clear that in the Marvel films the superheroes are more capable of handling problems than the government, or its cronies, are. ]]>
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  • Will 'Captain America: Civil War' Drop Marvel's Political Commentary?
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Will ‘Captain America: Civil War’ Drop Marvel’s Political Commentary? The new trailer for ‘Captain America: Civil War’ is out. Let’s guess at what it tells us of the Marvel-themed movie series. December 4, 2015 By Matt Battaglia Marvel released the new trailer for “Captain America: Civil War,” giving audiences their first look at the third entry in its Captain America film series. Initial reception looked to be high, especially considering that the trailer featured the much-anticipated first look at the Black Panther. However, the story elements the trailer displays suggest this movie may lack the sharp political edge of “Winter Soldier” and the comic book source material. The trailer obviously gives away the battle between Tony Stark and Steve Rogers, but the source of their feud looks different. In the comics, a group of poorly prepared and relatively novice superheroes end up fighting some overpowered bad guys, laying to waste a local elementary school. In the aftermath, the government requires all “super powered” beings to register. Stark and Rogers fall on opposing sides of the issue, and punching occurs. Naturally, the original material draws allusions to a huge range of topics, the gun debate being chief among them, but also explores the usual themes of over-expansive government, the encroaching security state, and the idea of individual mandates. This makes it less about where you fall on government regulation than whether Captain America is right in defending his buddy. The key change in the movie, at least from what’s shown in the trailer, is that Captain America is aiding his friend, Bucky (a.k.a. Winter Soldier) in avoiding law enforcement, who are rightfully ticked-off about Bucky’s role in the prior film’s events. This seems to incite the civil war and shift the dialogue of the movie to “What will you do to stand up for your friends?” It turns the rest of the cast into enforcers of the law. Remember, in “Winter Soldier” Bucky laid waste to public buses and downtown DC. Think about how much flooding landing those hellicarriers into the Anacostia River caused! This change of focus puts Captain America into an illogical position because it shows those looking to bring super-powered beings in have a just cause. This all results in taking the ideological stakes out of the fight, which makes it less about where you fall on government regulation of people’s lives than whether Captain America is right in defending his buddy who, while brainwashed, caused huge loss of life and property damage. In the comics it was heroes who, while intending to do good, wound up causing a large amount of collateral damage, which led to a call for regulation. The movie’s shift looks to be making an emotional appeal for Captain America’s side, rather than any sort of reasoned rationale. Considering that “Winter Soldier” did a great job talking about the National Security Agency, it feels like a step backward to potentially lose the trail of political commentary. Of course, this is all speculation based on a two-and-a-half-minute trailer, so it could be debunked. However, now would be the time to read the “Civil War” comic. It’s one of the better books Marvel has put out, and one of the few that actually has some interesting things to say that aren’t wrapped in identity politics. Matt is a graphic designer and comic book artist based in New Jersey. Previously, he worked in DC. You can follow him on Twitter @mattjbatt. You can pre-order his crime graphic novel, "Indoctrination, on >Amazon and check out his work at Task & Purpose and Free the People. Captain America Captain America: Civil War Marvel comics superhero movies Copyright © 2017 The Federalist, a wholly independent division of FDRLST Media, All Rights Reserved. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1463670073398-2'); }); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({mode:'thumbs-2r', container:'taboola-below-main-column-mix', placement:'below-main-column', target_type:'mix'}); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({flush:true}); 0 Comments /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'thefederalist23'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. comments powered by Disqus ]]>
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  • Retro ‘Captain Marvel’ Is Empowering But So-So Superhero Filler
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    'Captain Marvel' provides filler until the larger-scale 'Avengers: Endgame' arrives next month but seems lacking in commitment, ambition, and innovation.
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  • ‘Avengers: Endgame’ Wraps Up Epic Marvel Storyline With Fateful, Fantastic Finale
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    It's not perfect, but 'Avengers: Endgame' comes close enough that even the most superhero-saturated, seen-it-all fan will love it.
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    (Review Source)
  • ‘Spider-Man: Far From Home’ Takes Teen Hero On Planet-Saving Vacation
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    ‘Spider-Man: Far From Home’ is Peter Parker's most entertaining adventure yet.
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  • What Made ‘Avengers: Endgame’ The Highest-Grossing Movie Of All Time
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    After 11 years of story-building, Marvel finally gave audiences a sense of completeness, showing it's not always the journey but the conclusion that counts.
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  • Poor Ohioans' Tax Dollars Fund Rich People's TV Shows
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    If the existence of the show “Vanilla Ice Goes Amish” is not ridiculous enough, try the idea of giving it government funding. Believe it or not, Ohio taxpayers paid for this show’s production. Under the recently revised Ohio Motion Picture Tax Credit, annual funding for film productions in the state will double to $40 million. This credit is refundable, meaning Ohio taxpayers actually have to cut checks to production companies that film timeless classics such as “Alpha Dogz Presents: Pups United.” (Buckeyes, you need to watch this trailer to see how your tax dollars are being used.) To be fair, since the state’s film tax credit program was first passed in 2009, blockbuster hits including “The Avengers” and “Captain America: Winter Soldier” have also been filmed in Ohio. But does subsidizing film actually pay off? Why These Credits Don’t Pay Off Supporters of film subsidies always point to job creation and increased sales for local businesses when productions come to town. Several studies have tried to estimate the economic benefit of Ohio’s film tax credit. A 2014 study from the University of Cincinnati looked at three major movie productions filmed in the Cincinnati Metropolitan Statistical Area between 2012 to 2014. The study found that granting $6.5 million in film tax credits created 4,028 jobs—for a total economic effect of $45.9 million on the region. However, these numbers are about as realistic as talking dogs saving the day (have you watched the Pups United trailer yet?). A more recent report from Cleveland State University raises serious questions about the University of Cincinnati study. CSU estimates that the 31 projects that received Ohio film tax credits from 2011 to 2015, a significantly wider timeframe, resulted in only 1,729 new jobs for the state. Including 10 times as many projects, CSU’s estimate of jobs is less than half of the 4,028 jobs the University of Cincinnati reported. Even the claim that 1,729 full-time equivalent jobs were created has to be taken with a grain of salt. The report does not break down the duration of these jobs. Determining the number of full-time jobs that can be sustained for multiple years is crucial when assessing the success of any program. There is ample reason to doubt that targeted tax credits—especially those for film—create lasting economic growth. These studies were both prepared for Ohio-area film commissions—obviously biased sources that stand to benefit from favorable results. It is important to note that every independent study of film tax credits has found they do not create lasting economic development nor come anywhere close to paying for themselves. Few Benefits to Locals, Most to Rich Out-of-Staters Additionally, work in the film industry is transient and skilled. Instead of recreating Hollywood in Cleveland, Ohio’s film tax credits simply lure out-of-state workers for single projects. If Ohio cannot keep up with other states’ subsidies (California has a $330 million a year film credit budget and New York’s limit is $420 million), filmmakers will simply pick up and move to another state. Looking at the hard numbers, the CSU report shows Ohio received $6.7 million in state and local taxes out of its initial layout of $32.6 million, a low return of 20 cents on the dollar. While specific regions in the state may benefit for a short period of time, taxpayers and the state budget are the clear losers. Data from the CSU report shows that 70 percent of the tax credits were spent on only 7 of the 31 total productions listed in the paper. Before the new bill, there was a previous $5 million cap for single projects. However, when “Captain America: Winter Soldier” came to Ohio, the state allowed the film’s producer to file two separate applications to avoid exceeding the cap. This example demonstrates that Ohio’s film tax credit is simply another case of corporate welfare. With the program’s $300,000 production budget minimum, Ohio shows it has no interest in helping small, local filmmakers. Raising even more questions, the state audit report redacts information about how many Buckeyes were hired. The idea of having movie stars in your home state is undoubtedly attractive, which is part of the reason so many states have adopted these plans. What governor could resist taking a picture with Scarlett Johansson, who plays Black Widow in “Captain America”? But star-struck policymakers have created a battle between states to see who can offer the best incentives to attract large productions. If a state does not have a program, legislators and citizens presume their state is “missing out” on economic opportunity and new jobs. But film tax credits do not create many—if any—lasting jobs. They simply transfer jobs across the country, depending on which state offers more money. Fortunately, since 2009, 10 states have ended their film incentive programs. By dropping the film tax credit, the Ohio legislature could undoubtedly discover better ways to spend taxpayer money—such as improving the nation’s worst water supply. Or Ohio could work to improve its state business tax climate, which the Tax Foundation rates one of the ten worst in the country. Although saying goodbye to a potential third season of Vanilla Ice trying to be Amish may be a hard pill to swallow, Ohioans need to step away from the blinding Hollywood lights and take a closer look at the actual effect of their wasteful film tax credit. ]]>
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Hugh Hewitt3
Salem Radio Network



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The World Without God
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
      You read about the campus lunacy, but I don’t think it ever really hits home until your experience it personally. Recently California State University Northridge held an exhibition of comic book art by the greatest master of the form, Jack Kirby.  While not the best such exhibition I have ever seen, it far surpassed my expectations given its humble venue – or it did until I got my belated (it was so popular they sold out) copy of the exhibition catalog. One of the articles in the catalog featured a discussion of a page in which Ben Grimm, the rock-skinned “Thing” of the Fantastic Four, is told for the first time the name of Reed and Sue Richard’s son, Franklin Benjamin Richards.  It is a comic page that I have seen and read many times, but when I viewed that page at the exhibition raw from the artist’s hand and not the printer’s press it moved me in new ways. I looked at it for a very long time.  The monstrous appearing Grimm, that struggles so mightily to fit into humanity, is deeply moved and I was moved with him. The Ben Grimm character has almost universal appeal – not unlike Charlie Brown in the recent Peanuts movie.  We all feel like we do not fit in.  We all struggle to be good in the midst of our perceived oddity.  So when a klutz like Charlie Brown or a seeming monster like Grimm are recognized for their goodness – as when (spoiler alert) the little red-haired girl speaks to Charlie Brown at the end of the movie or Grimm’s closest friends name their child for him – we all feel the same amazement, joy and affirmation that the character does. That is unless you are someone related to a university somewhere commenting on art created before you were born and you feel the need to appropriate that almost universal appeal for your own private crusade. The individual that wrote the catalog piece concerning that comic page felt a need to make it about, are you ready for this because I am deadly serious, homosexuality.  This person felt that by including the monster in the perfect white family the comic book was “…exploding the concept of the heterosexual family.” So as I understand this commentator, a comic book drawn by a man married and with children, one of the creators of Captain America in World War II, in 1970, for an audience of young boys roughly 8-14, under the Comics Code Authority is intended to deal with questions of sexuality?! What bothered me far more than the morality of such a writing was the clear lack of intellectual rigor.  The commentator offered no evidence whatsoever that might corroborate their contention that this page had anything to do with sexuality.  Was Kirby closeted?  And if so, what evidence exists for that conclusion?  Was this theme evident in his other work?  These are just a few pieces of information that might have made the piece seem scholarly in some fashion instead of the pure imposition of an agenda.  Next thing you know my geology professor friend is going to be showing me papers where some student contends that igneous rock is really just symbolic of ejaculation. G.K. Chesterton is widely purported to have said, “When Man ceases to worship God he does not worship nothing but worships everything.”  But that does not appear to be the case.  What he really said was: It’s the first effect of not believing in God that you lose your common sense. That rings self-evidently true after reading that exhibition catalog.  Simple common sense tells us that a deeply personal and moving page in a comic book about people that stretch, catch on fire, and turn invisible to battle enemies from “The Negative Zone,” isn’t about sexuality.  At base it is about story pacing, narrative arc and creating a connection between the reader and the character so the reader will purchase the comic book you produce next month. We have, for several decades now, laughed a bemused laugh when things very silly and unconnected from reality like that catalog piece came into our view.  We have said to ourselves things like “Kids will be kids” and “Those that can’t teach,” and assumed that life would knock some common sense into these people at some point.  But Chesterton had it right, life does not knock common sense into people; God does.  Unfortunately, God can be very hard to find in the world today. The reason God is hard to find is not because the schools and popular culture have crowded Him out, but because we have.  We have settled for good enough, when God wants us to be sincerely and passionately good.  God’s light is hard to find because we are lousy lamps. Today begins Advent.  Advent is the season when we wait expectantly for the arrival of our Savior.  I feel the need for His arrival more this year than I have in many an Advent season.  But in reality while we await His coming, He is already here.  It is high time we started acting like it. ]]>
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  • Nothing Is Safe
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    It seems Stan Lee came under fire for comments he made for International Women’s Day yesterday.  For the uninitiated, Stan Lee is the guy that basically made Marvel Comics happen during the birth of the so-called “Silver Age” in the 1960’s.  Working with numerous, gifted, and in this writer’s opinion underappreciated, collaborators like Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, Lee is responsible for bringing the world Spider-Man, The Fantastic Four, The X-Men, The Avengers, and reviving all time classics like Captain America.  Part of Lee’s magic was to build “relevancy” into his projects.  He brought the first black superhero to the nation and his women characters were more than someone for the star of the book to rescue. But alas, when he tweeted out the cover to a book he produced in the 70’s all about women superheroes he was subjected to a tweet storm of how the heroes are too well built and body shaming of normally proportioned women.  Apparently unrealistically thin waists and over-sized breasts are too big of a stretch of the imagination in a character that can project impenetrable force fields and turn invisible. I have one question – Is nothing fun anymore?  Seriously, these are comic books!  They are almost by definition stupid.  The whole idea is to suspend reality and enjoy a flight of fancy.  I love them so deeply because when they are done right they simply make me happy.  Yes, on occasion they have produced powerful social insight but that is not why the average fan reads them week after week after week.  That’s not why people like me invest vast sums of money and time in collecting, cataloging and consuming them.  That’s something one does because it is fun. The social commentary that has come from the medium so impactfully is usually a happy accident.  These things are cranked out like popcorn at the movie theater.  In an effort to sell, people write about what’s on people’s minds at the moment, but there is no time for research, background or deep thought – the deadline is just around the corner.  Once in a while a writer gets a fixed short run assignment – a so-called miniseries – in which he or she can be more purposeful but the demands of comic book publishing do not allow for the kind of insight one can get from a novel or essay. Have you ever asked yourself why the heroes wear the masks and brightly colored costumes?  The artist has to move so fast they have no time to render details of a human face, so they draw the same idealized face over and over and over again and quickly adorn it with the mask so you can tell Captain America from Iron Man.  Same thing for women’s bodies.  These artists have no time for the subtlety of a Degas or Da Vinici – they draw the same very idealized body over and over. But no – in our politically correct age we can’t simply enjoy a good yarn where good guys beat up bad guys all of them in tights looking like Athena and Adonis.  No, we have to make sure our heroes are diverse in race, gender and body type.  Give me a break! Have you ever read I Chronicles 16?  It’s the chapter of the Bible where King David first brings the Ark of the Covenant back to the nation of Israel.  This results in sheer joy among the Israelites.  He commissioned his chief poet to write about it and the resulting Psalm says this: But the Lord made the heavens. Splendor and majesty are before Him, Strength and joy are in His place. Sometimes it is enough just to enjoy something – simply to be happy.  I just read a comic book yesterday that made me happy like that.  Unfortunately such things are becoming harder to find in the sea of graphic story-telling designed to appeal to the current joy-sucking environment of our nation. I do not think it unrelated that we find simple joy leaving our culture at the same time God is.  And I think that observation holds the key to restoring such joy to us. ]]>
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  • The Characters Are Not The Problem
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Odysseus…Aeneas…Gilgamesh…King Aurthur…Paul Bunyan…Superman.  Why are the stories of Odysseus and Aeneas considered some of the greatest literature of history and Superman considered disposable pulp?  Why are guys who make a living in superhero movies, claim they are dumbing us down?  Utter geek that I am (my comic book collection reaches to about 8000 books and don’t even ask about the decor of my office) I cannot entirely disagree with the the assessment if for no other reason than of those thousands of comic books only a precious few rise to the level of greatness.  History is what makes the difference. Surely Homer did not sit down and write “The Iliad” and “The Odyssey” from scratch.  The stories had been told over and over and over again.  Homer simple took the legends and distilled them and rendered the best tellings.  Likewise Virgil and “The Aeneid.”  The stories were, until they were so carefully refined, disposable pulp.   Thousands of years from now the thousands of Superman/Batman/Captain America/Iron Man… stories that are utter drivel will be gone, but the good ones will remain.  They are pulp now because the refining process has not yet occurred.  But they are vastly important to our culture. The legends survive because they capture what is great about the culture from which they spring.  If they do not define the values of the culture they sanctify them.  The cultural values are encapsulated, chronicled, rendered accessible and as such the are drilled into the minds of all.  These legends are valuable things if we are smart enough to manage them properly. Since my boyhood I have learned so much from these characters.  From Spider-Man I learned that heroism does not always come from heroic types.  From Superman I learned that great power does not make right, it is how that power is used.  From Captain America I learned that it is not corny to love America.   I could go on all day descending into characters that only the writer and I know about. But that does not mean the movies are all good.  For every great exchange about leadership between Loki and Thor in “Marvel’s The Avengers” there are the banal “witticisms” of Ultron in the latest Avengers film.  That’s why history has to distill the legend.  That is why we have a choice on which ones we remember and which ones we quickly discard to the rubbish heap. If something is dumbing us down as Simon Pegg claims in the link above it is not superheroes.  They reflect us, they do not define us.  So the question put before us by the spectacle that is these movies is are we, by our habits of consumption and our chatter, going to allow them to become our gladiators, that which we consume while our civilization shrinks?  Or are we going to look to the better tellings and use them for inspiration to maintain and prosper our society.  It is indeed up to us. ]]>
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John Nolte3
Daily Wire / Breitbart



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • ‘Avengers: Age of Ultron’ Review: Simply Spectacular
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Faced with the daunting task of a follow-up to his critically-lauded 2012 box office sensation “The Avengers,” writer/director Joss Whedon faced a lift as heavy as Thor’s hammer. Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.), Thor (Chris Hemsworth), Captain America (Chris Evans), Hulk (Mark Ruffalo), Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson), and Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner), are all stars in their own right. You need to do more than just give them moments, you need to treat them like stars. In order to accomplish this, six character must be portrayed as heroic. Six characters must have their characters and mythologies deepened. Six characters must have their inter-relationships advanced in some way.  Naturally, all of this must be delicately structured into a screenplay that delivers a cohesive, compelling story interrupted by jaw-dropping action set-pieces. Whedon’s screenplay, which deserves an Oscar nomination, doesn’t just hit a home run, it hits a grand slam. Not only does “Ultron” achieve everything mentioned above, a number of surprise guests (at least for me) are also allowed to shine, as are two new super-powered individuals: Quicksilver and Scarlet Witch (Aaron Taylor-Johnson and Elizabeth Olsen reuniting from last year’s “Godzilla”). There’s also the villain, Ultron (voiced brilliantly by James Spader), who you
    ...
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  • 'Ant-Man and the Wasp' Review: Nothing Deep, Just a Solid Action Comedy
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    if you have seen the Ant-Man and the Wasp trailer, you have pretty much seen the best parts of the movie.
    ...
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  • 'Mission: Impossible: - Fallout' Review: Best Action Movie Since 'Dark Knight'
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    'Mission: Impossible: - Fallout' is the best action movie since 'The Dark Knight' left us sockless ten years ago.
    ...
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The Unz Review Staff2
Unz Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Captain Marvel Hates You..., by Paul Kersey
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Captain Marvel is the typical Hollywood fantasy, with a woman playing the “captain,” plenty of heroic non-whites, and lots of bad white people. It will be released this Friday, March 8, which happens to be International Women’s Day. It’s all too trite for words. But Marvel Cinematic Universe and Disney may just be pushing their...
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  • As Predicted, AVENGERS: ENDGAME Genocides Whites—Will Franchise (Like America) Survive?, by Paul Kersey
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Disney’s Avengers: Endgame, the culmination of 22 prior movies connecting the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), made an astounding $1.2 billion at the global box office this weekend. [‘Avengers: Endgame’ Sets Global Box Office Record: $1.2 Billion, by Christopher Palmeri, Bloomberg, April 28, 2019] But the plot signals the end of the line for MCU white...
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    (Review Source)

Kyle Smith1
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The Post's critics' top 10 movies of 2014
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    birdmanboyhoodcalvarycaptain americadawn of the planet of the apesinterstellarinto the woodsnightcrawlerselmathe imitation gamethe theory of everythingwhiplash This has been a year when audiences flocked to the likes of “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay, Part I,’’ “Transformers: Age of Extinction,’’ “Guardians of the Galaxy,’’ “The Fault in Our Stars’’ and “Gone Girl.’’ What did The Post’s film critics prefer? Lou Lumenick and Kyle Smith sat down to hash out their own top picks: Lou: We’ve been working together on the movie beat for nearly 10 years, and we’ve only matched our top choice twice. This year, at least, each of our No. 1 films of the year are somewhere on the other’s list. Kyle: Didn’t you call “Boyhood” a gimmick movie? I thought “Birdman,” which is styled to look like most of the movie is a single take, was the ultimate in artifice for its own sake. In any case: Both made your list! Viva the gimmick! Lou: Well, “Edge of Tomorrow’’ on your list is also a stunt — it’s the first Tom Cruise movie I’ve liked in years, plus it’s got a badass Emily Blunt. I suspect “Boyhood’’ and “Birdman’’ are strongly written and acted enough they would have worked without being stunts. Kyle: “Birdman” is not only one take, it’s one-note. Spare me the showbiz-is-agony woe. But I agree that “Boyhood” would be equally great if different actors played the kid over the years. The scene in which the mom — heartbreakingly good work by Patricia Arquette — cries when she sends her boy off to college might be the best of the year. “I just thought there would be more,” she says. Indelible. Another great parenting film was “Interstellar,” which yielded the profound thought that the reason we’re here is to make memories for our children. Lou: I think the emotional content was too much for some of our colleagues, who were complaining about the “incomprehensible” physics while claiming to understand Jean-Luc Godard’s inscrutable “Goodbye to Language.’’ Another celebration of out-of-the-box thinking — in physics and an unconventional marriage — can be found in “The Theory of Everything,’’ with super performances by Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones. Kyle: A surprisingly uplifting movie considering the hero spends most of it in dire straits. Given two years to live in 1963, Stephen Hawking is still cracking jokes, still enlarging our sense of wonder. Another movie that caught me unawares and made me cry was Rory Kennedy’s “Last Days in Vietnam.” The very word “Vietnam” is synonymous with folly and dishonor, yet this doc shows how, with ingenuity, tenacity and courage, US forces saved thousands of Vietnamese from the barbarians at the gates as Saigon fell in 1975. I would love to see this important, seldom-told story get the full Hollywood treatment. Lou: We’ve got a couple of great movies this year about real-life war heroes who meet unhappy ends. “The Imitation Game’’ has a fantastic Benedict Cumberbatch as closeted genius Alan Turing, who invents the computer to defeat the Nazis, only to end up prosecuted for his homosexuality. And then there’s your favorite, “American Sniper,’’ the first movie I’ve seen with Bradley Cooper where he actually disappears into the character. Kyle: Yes, he embodies the character — physical, taciturn, focused. The film’s director, Clint Eastwood, continues to be a puzzlement. Half the time his military movies amount to Howard Zinn anti-American propaganda, like “Flags of Our Fathers” and “Letters From Iwo Jima.” And yet “American Sniper” is anything but. It’s a mature, thoughtful, sober work — the capstone to his directorial career, the best military movie since “Black Hawk Down” and a tribute to the warrior class that is the guts of this country. Lou: At the other end of her career, Ava DuVernay arrives as a major filmmaker with “Selma,’’ an epic telling of the ’60s voter rights struggle in Alabama with a terrific David Oyelowo as Martin Luther King Jr. politically outmaneuvering Tom Wilkinson’s Lyndon Johnson. The marchers’ confrontation with cops on the bridge is the most powerful scene in a movie this year. Kyle: It reminded me of “Lincoln.” Many long, slow, quiet, dimly lit scenes. Both King and Abe deserved more exciting films. I much preferred the complex mind games in “Calvary” and “Whiplash.” The former is a devastating parable about the issues facing contemporary Catholicism, the latter a thrilling exploration of the pain that may be involved in attaining true mastery of craft. Lou: Hope you mailed your “Calvary’’ review to your No. 1 Catholic fan, Philomena Lee! I do think “Whiplash’’ is well worth seeing for J.K. Simmons’ mesmerizing performance as an abusive music teacher, though I question making him a role model. Another dark character I loved was Jake Gyllenhaal’s creepy TV cameraman in “Nightcrawler,’’ debuting director Dan Gilroy’s blackly hilarious mash-up of “Network’’ and “Ace in the Hole.” Kyle: It was amusing, but Billy Wilder was 10 times as caustic. The “serious” movies in general disappointed me this year, but I enjoyed a bunch of summer blockbusters. The new “Apes” movie was smart, eerie and gripping, and the second “Captain America” was nearly the equal of its predecessor — funny banter, sinewy action, well-drawn characters, a pleasingly complicated plot and one of the most ingeniously designed exposition scenes ever — Toby Jones explaining it all as a Nazi ghost speaking through 1970s computers. Lou: To me, “Captain America’’ was an interminable one-joke movie — Robert Redford collecting a paycheck playing a Nazi. Meanwhile, the unlikely collaboration between the Mouse House and Stephen Sondheim has turned out what may well be the best Hollywood musical so far this century — the deeply subversive “Into the Woods,’’ with fantastic singing by Emily Blunt and Meryl Streep. Just don’t bring the kids, PG rating or no. Kyle: Another one about the agonies of parenting. I venerate Sondheim, but the big-screen version is a bust. All I want for Christmas is for somebody to greenlight the “Wicked” movie already. Lou: Don’t hold your breath. I almost forgot to mention Lukas Moodysson’s “We Are the Best,” a delightful comedy-drama about aspiring punk rockers in 1980s Stockholm. Kyle: Time to get on out of here. I have to go convince my 6-year-old that “Big Hero 6” isn’t the greatest movie ever. Lou: And I have to buy a “Frozen’’ doll as a fifth birthday present for my granddaughter — who dismissed “How To Train Your Dragon 2’’ as a “boy movie.’’ Lou Lumenick’s Top 10 1. “The Theory of Everything”2. “Interstellar”3. “Selma”4. “We Are the Best!”5. “The Imitation Game”6. “Birdman”7. “American Sniper”8. “Nightcrawler”9. “Boyhood”10. “Into the Woods” Kyle Smith’s Top 10 1. “American Sniper”2. “Boyhood”3. “Calvary”4. “Whiplash”5. “The Theory of Everything”6. “Edge of Tomorrow”7. “Last Days in Vietnam”8. “Interstellar”9. “Captain America: The Winter Soldier”10. “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” Share this:FacebookTwitterGoogleFacebook MessengerWhatsAppEmailCopy ]]>
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The Weekly Standard Staff2
The Weekly Standard



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Tuesday Morning Quarterback: It's Tax Breaks for College Football Trump Should Care About
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    “Why is the NFL getting massive tax breaks while at the same time disrespecting our Anthem, Flag and Country?” Donald Trump tweeted last week, using German-style capitalization. Trump may have been thinking of the NFL’s headquarters tax exemption which, applying to the league’s New York City operation, is a sweetheart deal that long has been a subject of tittering among wealthy New Yorkers. Pro football voluntarily surrendered that exemption in 2015, though not for any noble reason. Tax law sa
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  • Substandard Show Notes‐‐Episode 1.26
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Endnotes and digressions from the latest show: * We've been undergoing something of a Sonny-sance lately, with more and more of the world coming around to the idea that Sonny Bunch is always right. But this week's episode may have set that movement back by quite a bit. Because in talking about Marvel movies, Sonny was as wrong as he's ever been. * Sonny claims that none of the Marvel movies are really good and that a piece of dreck like Guardians of the Galaxy Volume 2 is just as good
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Billy Roper1
The Roper Report



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

⚠️ EDGY 🔥 CONTENT 🔥 WARNING 🔥 (NSFW?) ⚠️

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  • Is America Headed For A Civil War?
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    In a big year for superhero movies, none grossed higher than Captain America: Civil War, the Joe & Anthony Russo-directed film that not only managed to tell a coherent, crowd-pleasing story that crammed in a dozen Marvel superheroes but also became the first Captain America film to cross the billion-dollar worldwide gross mark. [4] What the hell is next after Captain America: Civil War? Well, I guess I know what’s next. the Phase 3 of Marvel Cinematic Universe, which will go through deep
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American Renaissance1
American Renaissance



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Captain Marvel Hates You . . .
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    . . . so long as you are a “white dude.”

    The post Captain Marvel Hates You . . . appeared first on American Renaissance.

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The Weekly Substandard Podcast1
The Weekly Standard



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The Substandard Reviews Guardians of The Galaxy and Pizza!
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The Substandard discusses Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 —it was great, it was good, it was terrible! JVL gives us a rundown of the Substandard Season One, Sonny's theory on chain restaurants is challenged—by Sonny! Vic's not afraid of "street meat." Plus pizza rankings and a word from our sponsor, all on this week's episode of the Substandard! This week's episode of the Substandard is sponsored by Dollar Shave Club. Try the $5 starter box (a $15 value!) with free shipping by visiting:
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Crosswalk1
Cross Walk



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • What Do the Golden Globes Say about Us?
    (”Captain America: The Winter Soldier” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Movies Time magazine calls the Golden Globes “Oscar’s looser, boozier cousin.” Last night’s show, filled with A-list actors and those who want to be, launched the annual awards season that culminates this year with the Academy Awards on February 26. What do the Golden Globes say about our culture? Let’s begin with what they don’t say. They don’t predict the Academy Award for Best Picture—Spotlight, last year’s Oscar winner, didn’t win a single Golden Globe. Only once in the last seven years did the Golden Globes and the Oscars choose the same Best Picture winner (Gravity in 2013). (However, from 1999 to 2003, the two were aligned on Best Picture ten out of eleven years.) La La Land won last night for Best Picture in a musical or comedy; Moonlight won for Best Picture in a drama. We’ll see if either wins the Oscar for Best Picture. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-1'); }); Here’s what the Golden Globes do say. There is room in our culture for grace. The Golden Globes are decided by the Hollywood Foreign Press Association (HFPA), an organization composed of ninety international movie and television journalists based in Southern California. The group awarded the first Golden Globes in January 1944. World War II was still raging, but the HFPA thought a January celebration of movie and television achievement was warranted. Here’s why: the organization uses the event to raise funds for entertainment-related scholarships and nonprofits. In 2015, the group awarded grants totaling $2.1 million, bringing their overall donations to more than $21 million. We are looking for joy. This year’s host, Jimmy Fallon, promised that the night would be “fun, and friendly, and joyous, and cool.” He delivered on his promise, beginning with the opening number’s spoof of La La Land. While the Academy Awards has an entire segment devoted to movie professionals who died in the previous year, the Golden Globes briefly noted that many celebrities died in 2016 before paying tribute to Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher. We need hope. Actors who played Wonder Woman, Batman, and Thor all made presentations. Deadpool was the first live-action superhero movie to be nominated for Best Picture. One of the screenwriters for Captain America: Winter Soldier offered this explanation for the popularity of superhero movies: “You went to the movies in the 50s and 60s you went to a western. So at this point, you’re going to a superhero movie. It’s taking over that same black hat, white hat myth-making surface.” Meanwhile, La La Land won a record seven Golden Globes. Accepting the award for best actress, Emma Stone said, “I think that hope and creativity are two of the most important things in the world, and that’s what this movie is about.” Grace, joy, hope—three themes that resounded in the life and ministry of Jesus. The reason the gospel is still good news is that neither human nor divine character changes. Whether they know it yet or not, every human heart echoes the ancient cry, “Sir, we wish to see Jesus” (John 12:21). Now we are the body of Christ. Will our lost culture see his grace, joy, and hope in us today? Image courtesy: Google Publication date: January 9, 2017   For more from the Denison Forum on Truth and Culture, please visit www.denisonforum.org. Do you want to live a life in whole-hearted pursuit of loving God and others?  Read today's First15 at www.first15.org. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-2'); }); if (gptClientWidth >= 992 && gptClientWidth <= 1000000) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-3'); }); ]]>
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Return of Kings Staff1
Return of Kings



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

⚠️ EDGY 🔥 CONTENT 🔥 WARNING 🔥 (NSFW?) ⚠️

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