Captain America: Civil War

Not rated yet!
Director
Anthony Russo, Joe Russo
Runtime
2 h 27 min
Release Date
27 April 2016
Genres
Adventure, Action, Science Fiction
Overview
Following the events of Age of Ultron, the collective governments of the world pass an act designed to regulate all superhuman activity. This polarizes opinion amongst the Avengers, causing two factions to side with Iron Man or Captain America, which causes an epic battle between former allies.
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  • Captain America's Latest Film Delivers
    Captain America’s Latest Film Delivers Without a false note in its two-and-a-half-hour run, ‘Captain America: Civil War’ may be the best Avengers movie yet. May 6, 2016 By Rebecca Cusey The geniuses at Marvel have figured out this superhero blockbuster movie thing. Take beloved characters and keep them true, mix in fantastic action scenes, weave in a theme that resonates with the audience—but never forget the audience comes to the movies, first and foremost, to have a good time. The latest example? “Captain America: Civil War,” a fully satisfying episode in the expanding Marvel Cinematic Universe. Without a false note in its two-and-a-half-hour run, this may be the best Avengers movie yet. It certainly holds its own in a franchise known for quality. As the advertising has promised, the film pits Captain America (Chris Evans) against Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.). The remaining heroes, plus a few newcomers, are forced to take sides, stretching their loyalties and causing some havoc in the process. Cry Havoc and Let Slip the Gods of War Havoc, as it turns out, is a ton of fun. The primary battle happens in an airport. Without ruining any surprises, let’s just say this long scene is absolutely the right blend of action and quips, explosions and laughs. All the action sequences are gripping, not too confusing, not too dark, just pure fun. Part of the reason these films work so well is because each character stays true to his or her primary motivation. Part of the reason these films work so well is because each character (and there are so many) stays true to his or her primary motivation. Each character has his or her story advanced, from Hawkeye’s (Jeremy Renner) pull between home life and action to the Scarlet Witch’s (Elizabeth Olsen) need to assert herself as an adult. Even War Machine (Don Cheadle) has his moment in the spotlight. These scenes flit by quickly, but we understand each person a tad better and care about them a bit more. That’s a hard trick to pull off with 12 superheroes to keep track of, not to mention the decidedly-less-super characters. Humor flows out of the essence of the characters, as well. We laugh most at those we love because their foibles are part of who they are. “Oh,” we think, laughing, “flirting with the amazingly still beautiful Marisa Tomei is SO something Iron Man would do!” That humor, with some excellent sight gags and a few nerdy references, makes the movie a chuckle-fest. The film introduces two new superheroes, one we haven’t met before onscreen and one we know all too well. Black Panther (Chadwick Boseman) is the son of a wise African king, a warrior and man of peace leading his people through the modern era. Boseman, who killed it as James Brown in the underappreciated “Get On Up,” plays the potentially hammy role with dignity and strength. He crackles onscreen. We will be seeing more of Black Panther. Since Marvel recently reacquired the rights to Spiderman, perhaps it shouldn’t be a shock that he makes an appearance in the film. If you’re rolling your eyes at yet another iteration of the webbed wonder, you’re not alone. The presentation is so pitch-perfect, however, he might win you over. Interwoven Fun and Sobriety The other reason the Avengers movies work so well is serious themes, but never at the expense of having a good time. The film focuses on an internal crisis of purpose, the fact that while superheroes battle for big ideas, innocents suffer. While Captain America never doubts the rightness of his actions, even as he mourns those lost, Iron Man is a bundle of doubts and worries. Cap does not hesitate to make hard choices. Iron Man would examine each option in depth if he could. He’s just trying to hold it together. While Captain America never doubts the rightness of his actions, Iron Man is a bundle of doubts and worries. This crisis of confidence feels so familiar, we do not need big, bad villains invading earth with otherworldly armies or maniacal demagogues attempting to rule the world. The villains will always be with us, but we need to figure ourselves out first. It is a civil war built into the fabric of America right now, evidenced in the real world by never-ending primaries and wars we can neither win nor leave. Some people in the audience, probably those further on the Right, are passionately #TeamCap. Others, probably those more on the Left, are just as strongly #TeamIronMan. One friend told me how it never occurred to her that Captain America might not be the hero and Iron Man might not be the villain until a friend shocked her by saying he was with Iron Man. Sometimes we get so locked in our own camps we never realize there might be another camp with a different perspective. The truth is that we need each other, those who never doubt and those who always doubt. That’s because, of course, we are all on the same side. This is what the Avengers keep trying to tell us. Like them, though, we seem to need to work it out for ourselves. ‘Captain America: Civil War’ is rated PG-13 for violence, action, and mayhem. There is no overt sexuality nor language and the violence is not gory. As long as kids are old enough to enjoy action, this is a good film to enjoy with the family. Rebecca Cusey is a movie critic based in Washington DC. She is a member of the Washington Area Film Critics Society and a voting Tomatomer Critic on Rotten Tomatoes. Follow her on Twitter @Rebecca_Cusey. Photo Marvel Entertainment / YouTube Captain America Captain America: Civil War Chris Evans Iron Man Marvel Marvel comics Robert Downey Jr superhero movies superheroes The Avengers Copyright © 2017 The Federalist, a wholly independent division of FDRLST Media, All Rights Reserved. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1463670073398-2'); }); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({mode:'thumbs-2r', container:'taboola-below-main-column-mix', placement:'below-main-column', target_type:'mix'}); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({flush:true}); 0 Comments /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'thefederalist23'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. comments powered by Disqus ]]>
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  • Will 'Captain America: Civil War' Drop Marvel's Political Commentary?
    Will ‘Captain America: Civil War’ Drop Marvel’s Political Commentary? The new trailer for ‘Captain America: Civil War’ is out. Let’s guess at what it tells us of the Marvel-themed movie series. December 4, 2015 By Matt Battaglia Marvel released the new trailer for “Captain America: Civil War,” giving audiences their first look at the third entry in its Captain America film series. Initial reception looked to be high, especially considering that the trailer featured the much-anticipated first look at the Black Panther. However, the story elements the trailer displays suggest this movie may lack the sharp political edge of “Winter Soldier” and the comic book source material. The trailer obviously gives away the battle between Tony Stark and Steve Rogers, but the source of their feud looks different. In the comics, a group of poorly prepared and relatively novice superheroes end up fighting some overpowered bad guys, laying to waste a local elementary school. In the aftermath, the government requires all “super powered” beings to register. Stark and Rogers fall on opposing sides of the issue, and punching occurs. Naturally, the original material draws allusions to a huge range of topics, the gun debate being chief among them, but also explores the usual themes of over-expansive government, the encroaching security state, and the idea of individual mandates. This makes it less about where you fall on government regulation than whether Captain America is right in defending his buddy. The key change in the movie, at least from what’s shown in the trailer, is that Captain America is aiding his friend, Bucky (a.k.a. Winter Soldier) in avoiding law enforcement, who are rightfully ticked-off about Bucky’s role in the prior film’s events. This seems to incite the civil war and shift the dialogue of the movie to “What will you do to stand up for your friends?” It turns the rest of the cast into enforcers of the law. Remember, in “Winter Soldier” Bucky laid waste to public buses and downtown DC. Think about how much flooding landing those hellicarriers into the Anacostia River caused! This change of focus puts Captain America into an illogical position because it shows those looking to bring super-powered beings in have a just cause. This all results in taking the ideological stakes out of the fight, which makes it less about where you fall on government regulation of people’s lives than whether Captain America is right in defending his buddy who, while brainwashed, caused huge loss of life and property damage. In the comics it was heroes who, while intending to do good, wound up causing a large amount of collateral damage, which led to a call for regulation. The movie’s shift looks to be making an emotional appeal for Captain America’s side, rather than any sort of reasoned rationale. Considering that “Winter Soldier” did a great job talking about the National Security Agency, it feels like a step backward to potentially lose the trail of political commentary. Of course, this is all speculation based on a two-and-a-half-minute trailer, so it could be debunked. However, now would be the time to read the “Civil War” comic. It’s one of the better books Marvel has put out, and one of the few that actually has some interesting things to say that aren’t wrapped in identity politics. Matt is a graphic designer and comic book artist based in New Jersey. Previously, he worked in DC. You can follow him on Twitter @mattjbatt. You can pre-order his crime graphic novel, "Indoctrination, on >Amazon and check out his work at Task & Purpose and Free the People. Captain America Captain America: Civil War Marvel comics superhero movies Copyright © 2017 The Federalist, a wholly independent division of FDRLST Media, All Rights Reserved. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1463670073398-2'); }); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({mode:'thumbs-2r', container:'taboola-below-main-column-mix', placement:'below-main-column', target_type:'mix'}); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({flush:true}); 0 Comments /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'thefederalist23'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. comments powered by Disqus ]]>
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  • Sorry, #TeamIronMan, But Government Shouldn't Boss Superheroes Around
    In the Washington Post, Sonny Bunch struggles to make the case for #TeamIronMan given “Captain America: Civil War,” while missing the factual evidence shown in the movies. “Civil War” is essentially the culmination of this latest round of Marvel movies: “Iron Man 3,” “Thor 2,” “Captain America: The Winter Soldier,” “Ant-Man,” and “Avengers 2” (while that last adds to the reasons Bunch is wrong, is an utterly awful waste of two hours and however millions of dollars). “Civil War” is loosely based on a post-9/11 Marvel event comic of the same name that a recent re-reading shows is, to be generous, quite thin and its political content overblown. Captain America fights government regulation of super-powered individuals because “Masked heroes have been a part of this country for as long as anyone can remember.” That’s Captain America’s first argument. The general gist of the story is this: Tony Stark is enforcing a registration act for all super-powered people, and if they don’t register they get thrown in jail. Captain America disagrees, and they fight. The book closes with a cheesy scene where average New Yorkers jump in the middle of the fight and Captain America says “Oh, man, look we’re just fighting” and surrenders. Truly, the only one who stays ideologically consistent throughout the book is the Punisher, who joins up because Iron Man hires known supervillains to track down un-registered heroes. Then Captain America kicks the Punisher out when he does the thing he said he wanted to do. Message: Government Can’t Handle Anything All this preamble aside, the movie deals with some better inciting incidents and clearer motivations for the characters than the comics do (because the movies only have to deal with 11 movies’ worth of continuity rather than something like 60 years). Anyone on #TeamIronMan is missing that, without the Avengers’ actions—the actions of an outside-of-government group—the events in the various movies would have been far more catastrophic. The only real conclusion to draw from the past string of Marvel movies, in sharp contrast to those from the books, is that the government is a genuinely ineffective machine incapable of handling problems. Without the Avengers’ actions—the actions of an outside-of-government group—the events in the various movies would have been far more catastrophic. Consider the events of the first Avengers movie. The solution of the “World Council,” which is effectively a United Nations stand-in, is to nuke Manhattan. This would have done two things: one, nuked Manhattan and killed everyone there and, two, not stopped the invasion because, you know, massive portal in the sky spewing out aliens. So chalk one up for individual action. In “Captain America: Winter Soldier,” SHIELD is discovered to be under the thumb of the evil criminal organization HYDRA. Their director (Robert Redford) is a HYDRA agent who used government funds to build a fleet of helicarriers to spy on civilians around the country then quickly execute them. This was literally paid for by government and the World Council that wants to hand down orders to Captain America, insisting he must only act under their authority. Captain America uses his brain and some teamwork to take down the helicarriers before they can mass execute. Again, government fails completely and utterly. Individuals taking action save the day once again. In “Avengers 2,” Tony Stark in his infinite wisdom creates a crazed artificial intelligence that tries to destroy the world. The whole registry controversy should almost exclusively be aimed at Stark, because in every single one of his movies, including “Avengers 2,” he basically fights a guy who uses Stark’s technology for evil. Maybe if Tony kept his own devices in check “Avengers 2” wouldn’t have happened and neither the fictional country of Sokovia nor the actual viewers who watched that movie would have suffered. Stark is suffering from guilt due to his own ego and stupidity, and uses that to attempt to place his associates under government control. Comic Depictions Versus Movie Depictions Bunch rightly points out that the United Nations is hardly a force that in reality should be bossing around a group like the Avengers, because even in real life they’re rather incompetent. Give them the Avengers, and they’ll likely just be repurposed to provide security for all the private jets flown to UN green summits. “Batman v Superman” briefly attempted to address this fundamental question of how would—or could—current states actually deal with super-powered vigilantes. It’s a theme that’s part of many of the most revered comics: “The Dark Knight Returns,” “Strikes Again,” “Master Race,” “Watchmen,” “Kingdom Come.” It’s a theme that, ironically, DC gets right in its comics but can’t figure out on-screen, while Marvel can’t do it in comics very well but blows DC’s screen attempt out of the water. It’s clear that in the Marvel films the superheroes are more capable of handling problems than the government, or its cronies, are. ]]>
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  • If You Like Glorying In Nihilism, You'll Love 'Deadpool'
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    If You Like Glorying In Nihilism, You’ll Love ‘Deadpool’ Deadpool knows he is in a movie and has pointed opinions on Marvel and modern life. February 12, 2016 By Rebecca Cusey “Deadpool” is not so much a movie as an extended inside joke with a movie wrapped around it. Not only does Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds) tell his backstory and chase his nemesis while protecting a lost love, he takes shots at Marvel in general and Wolverine in particular while maintaining a string of R-rated monologues on life, the universe, and everything that would send Captain America into spasms of mortification. Through it all, Reynolds apologizes abjectly for “The Green Lantern.” The plot tells the story of Wade Wilson’s transformation through a torturous quickening process from brutal, unhinged vigilante into a brutal unhinged vigilante with mutant powers. He could always hit hard, swing his katanas with deadly speed, and dodge danger, but after the quickening, he cannot be killed. All wounds heal except the emotional ones. The film gives Deadpool a lady love, Vanessa (the luminous Morena Baccarin, who at 37 makes a refreshingly age-appropriate match for the 40-year-old Reynolds). Their sexual activity (of which we learn in parent-distressing detail) may be kinky, but their love is surprisingly conservative. His heart is hers and marriage is on his mind. This is a step away from the maniacal, changing Deadpool of the comics, but it works in the film and gives the main character the motive for his mission of revenge. The spoofy opening credits just reek of smart-ass edginess, which sets the tone perfectly for the rest of the movie. From the hilarious frozen-in-time 3D opening sequence, though, the audience is put on notice that this isn’t your normal superhero movie. The spoofy opening credits just reek of smart-ass edginess, which sets the tone perfectly for the rest of the movie. Deadpool knows he is in a movie and has pointed opinions on Marvel and modern life. When he breaks the fourth wall, he crushes it. The biggest drawback of Deadpool—that is, if you can handle the explicit content—is also his greatest draw: A determined and unapologetic moral ambiguity. Deadpool isn’t a hero, he constantly reminds the audience, he is just a %&!# who beats up worse %&!#s. Lest you think this is all some cover for some coming moral revelation, the final scene explicitly sets up a moral conflict for him to fail. He gets the question. He gets the moral standard. He chooses not to follow it. The audience is left with the question of how they feel about that. I fear that many will cheer. The intended audience will certainly cheer for heavy R-rated content. The violence is intense, gleeful, and gory, with heads sprouting red mist left and right. Sexual content is about as far as you can go and still keep an R rating: Graphic nudity, bare boobies and butts, several scenes of actual sex, depictions of masturbation, the works. Of course, the language is what you’d expect. All the words and plenty of talk about obscene things. This is not one for the kiddos. But you knew that. What you want to know is whether it kicks ass. Yes. It accomplishes its goals, both in humor and in action sequences. The intended audience may be narrower than for “Captain America: Civil War” or “The Avengers,” but that audience will relish this flick. Maybe the degree of that relish is not comforting, but, then again, that is the point. Rebecca Cusey is a movie critic based in Washington DC. She is a member of the Washington Area Film Critics Society and a voting Tomatomer Critic on Rotten Tomatoes. Follow her on Twitter @Rebecca_Cusey. Photo 20th Century Fox / YouTube comics Deadpool FX Marvel Marvel comics Ryan Reynolds superhero movies superheroes Copyright © 2017 The Federalist, a wholly independent division of FDRLST Media, All Rights Reserved. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1463670073398-2'); }); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({mode:'thumbs-2r', container:'taboola-below-main-column-mix', placement:'below-main-column', target_type:'mix'}); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({flush:true}); 0 Comments /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'thefederalist23'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. comments powered by Disqus ]]>
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  • Gal Gadot's Wonder Woman Manages The Tough Task Of Winsomely Portraying Virtue
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Mild spoilers below. I wasn’t planning to see “Wonder Woman.” The plethora of superhero offerings we’ve had over the past decade or so—thanks to Christopher Nolan, Marvel Comics, and DC—have slowly brought me to superhero fatigue (excepting “Guardians of the Galaxy,” which is watchable for the music and humor alone). But when rumor had it that the new film starring Gal Gadot garnered a 97 percent Rotten Tomatoes rating, some friends and I decided we’d give it a shot, after all. We were not disappointed. The new “Wonder Woman” film has smashed records for a female director’s debut, bringing in more than $100 million at the U.S. and Canada box office this weekend. If the reviews—and applause in my theater post-movie—are any indication, the “Wonder Woman” accolades are just getting started. Parallels Between ‘Wonder Woman’ And ‘Captain America’ With “Wonder Woman,” director Patty Jenkins has achieved something quite remarkable in the superhero-glutted world of film: she’s offered a fresh story, as well as a genuinely likable and virtuous lead. The last time we got a superhero film that offered that sort of story, it was “Captain America” back in 2011. The two films strike similar notes: while “Captain America” is set during World War II, “Wonder Woman” takes place near the end of World War I. Both heroes are kindly, virtuous, and self-sacrificing. But the adventures of Steve Rogers (Chris Evans) proffered less action and more drama, and Rogers himself was characterized by physical weakness, until a mad scientist managed to turn him into a super-powered soldier. The film felt a bit slow in parts, and Rogers bordered on annoying at times. “Wonder Woman,” on the other hand, features a superhero who is both virtuous and inhumanly powerful. Due to her childhood training with the Amazons, Diana is gifted with immense intellectual and athletic prowess. We learn early on in the film that Diana speaks more than 100 languages, has immense knowledge of statecraft, science, and military strategy, and fights more passionately than any other Amazon warrior. Avoiding the Achilles Heel of Many Superhero Flicks When Steve Trevor (Chris Pine), a WWI spy, crash lands just offshore, Diana rescues him and brings him to the island of the Amazons. When she hears Trevor tell of the “war to end all wars,” she leaves her people to help him fight the Germans. Then we get to see what Diana is truly made of. There’s an unacknowledged Achilles heel in many superhero movies: to create impressive action scenes, many directors insert lots of smashing, blowing-things-up, car-crashing and building-demolishing sequences. But in doing so, their superheroes end up leaving massive, shocking carnage in their wake. Marvel’s last Avengers film, “Captain America: Civil War,” sought to acknowledge and address this problem. For the first time, the superheroes were forced to see the unintended consequences of their violence. Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) compels the Avengers to recognize the innocent lives they’d killed in pursuit of the bad guys. But “Wonder Woman” confronts this issue head-on from the very beginning. That’s what sets it apart from the other films in the Marvel and DC Comics arena. The Compassion of Gal Gadot’s Wonder Woman As soon as Diana sets foot in London, her eyes search for people to help and serve. Having grown up as the only child in a society of adults, she immediately sees the children surrounding her. She runs over to a mother holding her baby—the first baby she’s ever seen—and gushes over it. Despite the violence, bloodshed, and horror she confronts, Diana never stops seeing the vulnerable and the innocent. She sees soldiers maimed and suffering, and wants to stop and help them. She sees starving women and children, and is quick to advocate for them. She hears world leaders dismiss the death of their soldiers, and rebukes them for it. This does make Diana a rather Christological figure, as M. Hudson pointed out yesterday. But it also makes her, I would argue, a remarkably feminine superhero. At the risk of gender stereotyping, I would argue that women are often bogged down by the oppression of the small and the innocent. We can’t “get over it.” We can’t ignore it, even if we’re seeking out some greater good or purpose. When Trevor tells Diana to ignore the plight of soldiers and civilians along no man’s land, telling her “We can’t save everyone in this war! It’s not what we are here to do!” she replies, “You’re right… But it’s what I am going to do.” Later on, when a French village is wiped out by poisonous gas, Diana is not just furious—she’s heartbroken. She sees and appreciates every life lost. Her fury stems from outrage over injustice. There’s no glee to her killing, only righteous indignation. Wonder Woman Is Both Virtuous And Likable We caught glimpses of this in Captain America, Batman, and Superman, but it’s really hard to pull off this sort of virtuous indignation. Nobody enjoys watching a holier-than-thou protagonist. Most directors manage it by making their superheroes a bit “bad boy.” Batman and Iron Man are particularly good examples of this. Superman and Captain America tend to get labeled “annoying” or “too nice” to be truly entertaining leads. Yet Gadot manages to give us a sweet, kind heroine who is also genuinely entertaining. Despite her superhuman powers, her savvy, and her sweetness, we still like Diana. In fact—wonder of wonders—we like her because she is virtuous. That’s nigh unheard of in Hollywood. Sitting in the theater, I hoped that girls who flock to the theater for “Wonder Woman” would find themselves inspired to be a little more compassionate, selfless, and courageous because of Diana. Perhaps they’d be encouraged to see needy people they might otherwise ignore. Perhaps young and old would be inspired to fight the bullies of their world, to advocate for the oppressed and the downtrodden. Wonder Woman is actually the sort of superhero who makes you aspire to such things. Gender and Femininity In ‘Wonder Woman’ Parents should be aware of some suggestive comments or scenarios in the film. We see Chris Pine decidedly unclothed in one scene, using his hands to shield us from 100 percent nudity. The original Wonder Woman comics were accused of inciting lesbianism, and one quote hints (very subtly) at such background. The film’s Christological and mythological roots are decidedly interesting, and worth exploring with children who see the film. But I also think the film offers some moments in which we can explore our culture’s conceptions of femininity and masculinity, and see how this film portrays both. Diana eschews constricting Victorian clothing, but rushes to help little babies and needy people. She’s witty, but humble. She’s no damsel in distress, but accepts help. That makes her an interesting, and perhaps even countercultural, lead. Diana’s comrade-in-arms, Trevor, is a humble and quiet leader in his own right. The two protagonists complement and support each other throughout the film, each spurring the other toward greater virtue and courage. It’s rather inspiring, quite frankly. Diana’s greatness never makes us question Steve’s—rather, theirs is a reciprocal and complementary greatness. The Film’s Specific Moments of Suffering and Courage There’s some violence in “Wonder Woman,” but nothing especially graphic or gruesome. The film focuses less on quantity of blood and gore, and instead pinpoints specific moments of suffering and courage. It showcases the hurt of violence in grand and empathetic fashion. As such, it could be difficult for the sensitive viewer to watch. But for that reason, it is immensely relieving—and encouraging—to see that we aren’t the only ones noticing such moments of suffering this time around. Wonder Woman sees it all, too. And it hurts her as well. Jill Lepore complained in The New Yorker that Diana—ignorant and silent as she is concerning “women’s rights” and a more suffragette mentality—is an “implausible post-feminist hero.” But compassionate and sensitive to human suffering as she is, I’d rather argue that Diana is an apolitical feminist hero—and as such, will probably be controversial in days to come. Yet despite that potentiality, I think “Wonder Woman” could become a permanent classic in the superhero canon, because it transcends our moment and offers something—or rather, someone—both inspiring and thoughtful. And for that, I’m very thankful I saw the film. ]]>
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  • 'Fate Of The Furious' Is A Good Action Flick, But Doesn't Match Up To Its Predecessors
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Spoilers below. It’s not every movie series that can still command multimillion-dollar returns after seven films. As this eighth installment proves, the “Fast and Furious” series has fully metamorphosed from an exploration of outlaw car culture into a string of globetrotting spy epics. This saga’s willingness to double down on its own craziness makes “The Fate of the Furious” a pretty enjoyable throwaway action flick—even if it’s a little creakier than its immediate predecessors. Swapping “Furious 7” director James Wan for F. Gary Gray (last seen helming rap drama “Straight Outta Compton”), “Fate” starts off with a bang: Dom Toretto (Vin Diesel), while honeymooning in Havana with wife Letty (Michelle Rodriguez) is accosted by international criminal Cipher (Charlize Theron). Turns out Cipher needs Dom’s criminal skills to steal some dangerous weapons—and she’s quite willing to blackmail him to bring him on board. From that point on, most of “Fate” hinges on the novelty of pitting Dom against his former allies—an ensemble cast featuring Dwayne Johnson, Tyrese Gibson, Jason Statham, Ludacris, Kurt Russell, and so forth. The story, for the most part, relies on familiar plot beats: “Citizen Kane” this ain’t, but you knew that already. ‘Fate’ Lacks Is Predecessors’ Momentum There’s a lot to like in “Fate,” particularly its crackling dialogue (Johnson looks like he’s enjoying himself more here than he ever has) and chemistry between its core protagonists. Gray also throws in plenty of eye-popping action flourishes (an early prison riot, pitting Johnson against Statham, is particularly memorable), and smartly weighs in on current technological debates. Midway through the movie, Theron’s cyberterrorist hacks into driverless cars all across New York City and simultaneously seizes control of them all, sending a swarm of unmanned vehicles against our heroes. In an inspired moment vaguely reminiscent of “The Walking Dead,” the Furious crew desperately sprays machine-gun bullets into a mass of oncoming “zombified” cars, filling the screen with explosions. It’s the kind of plausible techno-horror—and utterly over-the-top vehicular carnage—that this saga does so well. By and large, Gray taps into two core elements of the “Fast and Furious” series—rapid-fire banter and insane automotive action—and tries to construct the rest of the film around those moments. Unfortunately, this means larger-scale plot elements fade into the background (yes, I realize this is a “Fast and Furious” movie, but I still have standards). High-stakes premise notwithstanding, “Fate” largely lacks the propulsive momentum of its immediate predecessors. Despite characters’ constant talk of impending doom, there’s not much narrative urgency here: even amid life-or-death confrontations, these characters find time to throw off quips. As a result, the film’s attempts at “darker” moments (including a particularly cold-blooded murder) feel tonally inconsistent. The Film’s Lost Opportunity For Character Development Moreover, the film’s much-hyped “good guy goes bad” premise—a la “Captain America: Civil War” and “Batman v Superman” simply isn’t executed as smoothly as it needs to be, and one can’t help thinking that Dom’s onscreen incentive to go rogue (and seriously endanger his “family”) is a little undercooked. That’s a real shame, because this thematic problem was entirely avoidable. Early on, Cipher taunts Dom by exposing a key tension in his character: if his commitment to family clashes with his love of reckless, death-defying racing, which impulse will ultimately win out? That’s a potent insight, particularly given how the series has evolved over time: the Dom Toretto of 2001 was a very different character than the Dom of 2017, and today’s Dom has far more to lose from engaging in self-destructive behavior. Frustratingly, this lurking question never materializes into an actual plot point, even though it’s a lot more inventive than “the bad guy kidnapped someone Dom cares about.” This Film Loses Sight Of the Franchise’s Core Emphasis And while the saga’s clearly willing to blow its massive budget on impressive action set pieces, the most heart-pounding moments in “Fate” actually arrive in the throwback opening sequence, as Dom faces off with a Cuban gangster in a classic street race. Frankly, I wish there’d been more scenes like that. The film’s final showdown—set in a Russian military base and featuring a gigantic attacking submarine—feels more like a “Call of Duty” mission than a “Fast and Furious” climax, and I couldn’t help thinking it would’ve fit just as well in a modern James Bond or “Mission: Impossible” movie. The sine qua non of this franchise is its focus on muscle cars and the drivers who master them, and “Fate” sometimes loses track of that core emphasis. (Also, this is a minor quibble, but the soundtrack for “Fate” isn’t quite up to snuff. 2 Chainz and Wiz Khalifa’s “We Own It”—the theme for the sixth installment—is still one of my favorite rap songs, and Juicy J’s “Payback” was almost as good last time around. There’s nothing quite so rousing here.) All that said, none of these criticisms are particularly damning. As a fan of the “Fast and Furious” franchise, I don’t expect high art, and it’s perfectly natural that this beloved series is showing its age the eighth time around. Where it counts, “Fate” largely checks the right boxes: crazy action, exotic scenery, camaraderie, explosions, and just the right amount of snark. Even if “Fate” doesn’t quite match up to its recent forerunners (“Fast Five,” “Fast & Furious 6,” “Furious 7”), it’s still a fine way to spend a Saturday afternoon. Hollywood can keep cranking out these movies, and I’ll keep watching them. I only hope they don’t forget the saga’s roots in the process. ]]>
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  • What Marvel Villains Need To Learn From 'Logan's' Wolverine
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The Marvel movies have a common problem: they lack conflict, both externally from villains and internally from lead characters’ emotional conflicts. “Logan” provides an example for the Marvel movies to follow. It builds conflict in an emotionally gratifying way, unlike the largely forgettable conflicts within existing Marvel movies. The Marvel Avengers Have Weak Conflicts The foes the various members of the Avengers square off against are never threatening enough that viewers fear for the heroes’ lives. Loki is “fun” to watch, but his performance is more akin to Jack Nicholson’s Joker, a fun character that lacks a threatening feel. In contrast, Heath Ledger’s Joker is a force of chaos. Recall the scene where he holds the fake Batman hostage. That is a frightening moment, and none of the Marvel villains ever manage to pull off something similar. “Guardians of the Galaxy” is widely considered one of the best Marvel movies, but the lead villain’s motivations are “get the macguffin,” and without consulting Wikipedia most people couldn’t name him. With the third Avengers movie coming soon and a “Guardians of the Galaxy” sequel coming even sooner, Marvel will likely continue its theme of having an entertaining main cast, fun yet forgettable set pieces, a general lack of stakes, feel-good outcomes, and in the case of “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” a nostalgia-laden soundtrack. The next Avengers movie’s villain is Thanos. We’re getting into some nerd territory here. He’s the purple guy who’s super into gems. His motivations are: collect gems, rule universe. In the comics he’s in love with Mistress Death, a skeleton lady. He has to kill stuff to keep her happy. It’s weird. Thanos represents just another in a long line of forgettable modern action villains whose motivations are so big they take the stakes of the action from “this city will be destroyed” to “this country” to “the earth” to “galaxy.” The problem of weak villains can be resolved with good character-driven conflict, emotional arcs that have weight. However, the characters within the Marvel movies have all become varying levels of Robert Downey Jr’s Iron Man, with varying levels of rude behavior. Each character speaks with the patented Whedon trifecta of snark, hippness, and in-jokes. They’re punchline delivery systems rather than fully formed characters. Captain America’s entire “man out of time” dilemma is cut down to a joke about him adding movies and albums to a list. What ‘Logan’ Can Teach the Marvel Universe Future Marvel movies ought to look to Logan for inspiration (some spoilers to follow). The movie’s on-paper villains aren’t particularly compelling. A scientist who was able to stop the mutant gene from appearing has been making his own weaponized mutants, and is aided by a mercenary force with robotic limbs. This provides lots of disposable things for Logan and Laura to slash their way through. However, the villains don’t have to do the work of building conflict in this movie. They only fulfill the action quota. Instead, the entire movie is built on a ticking clock, each character is driven by a fear of time. Professor X is basically living with Alzheimer’s, needing regular medicine doses or he loses control of his powers and shuts down the brains and motor functions of everyone around him. Logan’s healing powers are failing, and he’s been poisoned by the metal that made him invulnerable. He’s trying to save up to put himself and Xavier on a boat and drive out into the middle of the ocean where they can die in something akin to peace. Laura escaped her captivity in the lab she was grown in (sound familiar?) and must arrive to a safe haven within a specified window of time to escape the aforementioned evil scientist. The action stakes in Logan are small. There is no ancient Egyptian mutant god trying to bring about the end times, timelines aren’t being altered to deter the advance of Sentinels and post-apocalyptic mutant death camps, there is no climactic fight atop the Statue of Liberty where a costumed villain attempts to kill everyone in New York City. No, the action scenes in Logan are small and brutal. They take a toll on the characters. Throughout the movie, Logan’s scars are visible. As much as people anticipated seeing Logan really bare his claws and shred bad guys, he does so at his own peril, with the camera lingering on the sucking wounds that he incurs throughout, reminding the viewer of the toll violence takes. Keeping the focus on the effects action has on the characters keeps the character front and center, giving us the most human superhero story that we’ve seen on screen. This is something other Marvel movies lack. A Human Narrative We Can All Relate To Combining the various narrative ticking clocks and visual reminders that no one is impervious to violence keeps the tension high and allows the viewer to really focus on the small cast on display and their interaction with the real foe of the movie: time. Consider that Logan could be summarized thusly: a man dying from cancer takes his estranged, traumatized daughter and 90-year-old father with Alzheimer’s on a road trip to drop her off with a new family before they both die from their illnesses. Then consider the summary of the plot of “Captain America: Civil War”: super-powered people get into big fights about whether the government should make them join a registry. One is easily relatable, the other is not. The fear of the inevitable in “Logan” makes it a more effective movie than prior X-Men and Marvel movies, by forcing the characters to reconcile with a foe and situations which every member of the audience can relate to. Marvel would be wise to give their movie characters something real to struggle with rather than simply throwing pixels at the screen and promising ever-increasing scales of destruction. ]]>
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  • Radio: Anti-free Speech At Universities And Anticipated 'Suicide Squad' Movie
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Radio: Anti-free Speech At Universities And Anticipated ‘Suicide Squad’ Movie April 12, 2016 By The Federalist Staff On today’s Federalist Radio, Mary Katherine Ham, Guy Benson, and Robby Soave discuss the latest outrages on college campuses. Later in the hour, Emily Zanotti, senior contributor at The Federalist, joined to explain the premise and the buzz behind the anticipated “Suicide Squad” movie. One of the most recent acts of free speech that college students have taken offense to is the words “Trump 2016” written on sidewalks at their universities. “It’s remarkable the extent to which college students will ask their administrators to treat them like children,” Ham said. “A small glimmer of hope I’m seeing on college campuses is a copy catting of ‘Trump 2016’ chalking going on across the nation and my guess is that not all of it is sincere Trump support, but a lot of it is a statement for free speech.” Movie trailers for both “Suicide Squad” and “Captain America: Civil War” were released earlier this week during the MTV Movie Awards. “I don’t know about you, but I don’t know if I’m ready for someone who is not Heath Ledger to play the Joker,” Soave said. Listen now: Photo Warner Brothers Federalist Radio Hour Podcast suicide squad Copyright © 2017 The Federalist, a wholly independent division of FDRLST Media, All Rights Reserved. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1463670073398-2'); }); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({mode:'thumbs-2r', container:'taboola-below-main-column-mix', placement:'below-main-column', target_type:'mix'}); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({flush:true}); 0 Comments /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'thefederalist23'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. comments powered by Disqus ]]>
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  • Gal Gadot’s Wonder Woman Manages The Tough Task Of Winsomely Portraying Virtue
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The new 'Wonder Woman' film transcends our political moment and offers something—or rather, someone—both inspiring and thoughtful.
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  • ‘Black Panther’s’ Achievement Is Offering A Black Hero Who Lives In Freedom
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Yes, America, this is a story about the legacy of black pride and the civil rights struggle after the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.
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  • ‘Black Panther’ Is Boring As Heck Until The Villain Shows Up
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The screenwriters somehow managed to make the character seem smaller and weaker inside a film that was supposed to be all about the Black Panther.
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  • In Super-Sized ‘Avengers: Infinity War,’ More Is Definitely More
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Whatever your jam may be—fantasy, SF, action, horror, comedy, or melodrama—it’s guaranteed to be somewhere in this packed conglomeration.
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  • ‘Avengers: Endgame’ Wraps Up Epic Marvel Storyline With Fateful, Fantastic Finale
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    It's not perfect, but 'Avengers: Endgame' comes close enough that even the most superhero-saturated, seen-it-all fan will love it.
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John Hanlon10
John Hanlon Reviews



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Captain America: Civil War
    The latest Marvel movie hits theaters nationwide today but have critics tired of this ongoing franchise? We’ve looked over the Captain America: Civil War reviews and we’ve found a mix of both views. This latest installment focuses on the...
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  • “Captain America: Civil War” Reviews: Critics praise Marvel sequel
    The latest Marvel movie hits theaters nationwide today but have critics tired of this ongoing franchise? We’ve looked over the Captain America: Civil War reviews and we’ve found a mix of both views. This latest installment focuses on the growing animosity between...
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  • Box Office Report: “Captain America: Civil War” dominates in opening weekend
    The box office report for Captain America: Civil War‘s opening weekend is in and the results are pretty tremendous. The film dominated at the box office earning an estimated 181 million dollars. The movie opened lower than Marvel’s The Avengers and the sequel...
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  • The 10 Best Movies of 2018
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
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  • “X-Men Apocalypse” crushes “Alice” over long weekend
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The X-Men Apocalypse Memorial Day Box Office numbers are in and they show that the film crushed the Alice in Wonderland sequel handily. This Memorial day was a big one at the box office. Not only was X-Men Apocalypse, unhealthy the latest installment in the X-Men series,...
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Dave Cullen2
Computing Forever



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Captain America: Civil War Review (Major Spoilers)
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  • Avengers: Endgame Ending Has a Massive Plot Hole (Spoilers)
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
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Crosswalk6
Cross Walk



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • There's a Lesson for Us in Captain America: Civil War
    Movies "I'm going, but I don't want to see 'my friends' fight," said my companion. The battles are epic and the quips keep coming, but this dark story opens a wound in Team Avengers that may never completely heal. By all means see it, but expect to come away a little heart-heavy. 4 out of 5. Want Another Take? Watch Our Video Review of Captain America: Civil War   Synopsis It’s not easy being an Avenger; saving the world is a big job and it's not always just the bad guys who get caught in the crossfire. What's a superhero to do? Submit to governmental oversight, or continue as an independent operation? That's the question that splits the Avengers in two, pitting Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) and friends against Captain America (Chris Evans) and other friends as both struggle to do what they believe is right, no matter the cost.   What Works? The battles are intense, the heartbreak is real, and the object lesson of "divided we fall" has never been more plain. Introducing more characters into the already-crowded Avengers field could have been a mess, but the new kids fit in nicely. Ant-Man (Paul Rudd) holds his own, and Spider-Man (Tom Holland) feels like the son Tony Stark never knew he had (he isn't, but their interactions are a joy to behold). Remember: Captain America: Civil War is a Marvel film so stay until the end. The very end.  SEE ALSO: Remarkable Heroes Remarkably Human in Enjoyable Avengers: Age of Ultron googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-1'); }); What Doesn't? The story takes a while to get going. After the initial excitement the plot drags along before the patented charm kicks in. The story is darker than previous episodes, albeit with less of a gloomy palette than, say, Batman v Superman, so it’s not as much fun as earlier Marvel films. In fact, it is often downright painful to watch our ‘friends’ and their relationships come apart.   Christian Worldview Elements / Spiritual Themes Vengeance is the driving force behind much of the mayhem. A little forgiveness would go a long way—but it would also have made for a significantly shorter and less exciting movie. The most poignant point is that the Avengers may be unbeatable when attacked by outside forces, but they are quite capable of destroying each other. It's a lesson Christians might take to heart.   CAUTIONS (may contain spoilers) MPAA Rating: PG-13 for extended sequences of violence, action and mayhem  Language/Profanity: A handful of the milder profanities are scattered throughout with one "Jesus" and a couple of God d**n thrown in. Sexuality/Nudity: A longish kiss but it's more sweet than sultry. Violence/Frightening/Intense: Most of the movie involves violent fights, large- and small-scale battles, explosions, and so on, but the emotional intensity is generally more distressing than the physical, and that includes a couple of torture scenes. Drugs/Alcohol: Some drinking.   The Bottom Line RECOMMENDED FOR: Marvel fans, people who enjoy a fight but want an alternative to election coverage, dates (eye candy for everyone!), families (several good teachable moments). NOT RECOMMENDED FOR: Squeamish types, viewers who don't appreciate sci-fi, sensitive souls who want to avoid violence, and people with no sense of humor.SEE ALSO: Captain America Sequel Explores Themes of Ethics, Trust Captain America: Civil War, directed by Anthony Russo & Joe Russo, opened in theaters May 6, 2016; available for home viewing September 13, 2016. It runs 146 minutes and stars Chris Evans, Robert Downey Jr., Scarlett Johansson, Anthony Mackie, Don Cheadle, Jeremy Renner, Chadwick Boseman, Paul Bettany, Paul Rudd, Elizabeth Olsen, Sebastian Stan, Tom Holland, Marisa Tomei, William Hurt, Frank Grillo and Martin Freeman. Watch the trailer for Captain America: Civil War here.   Susan Ellingburg spends most days helping to create amazing live events and most nights at the movies, at rehearsals, or performing with vocal ensembles in the Dallas area. This leaves very little time for cleaning house. A natural-born Texan, Susan loves all things British, Sunday afternoon naps, cozy mysteries, traveling with friends, and cooking like a Food Network star (minus the camera crew). googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-2'); }); if (gptClientWidth >= 992 && gptClientWidth <= 1000000) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-3'); }); Publication date: May 5, 2016 SEE ALSO: Captain America is Red, White and Blasé ]]>
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  • Captain America: Civil War - Best Ensemble Superhero Movie Ever?
    Movies Crosswalk's Shawn & Steve, who skewered DC's Batman v Superman, say that no matter how you approach it, the newest Marvel movie works exceedingly well. Expect to have fun, AND something to talk about!]]>
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  • CrosswalkMovies.com's Top 10 Films of 2016
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Movies Call 2016 many things, but on the entertainment front, be sure you recognize it as the year Andrew Garfield helped bring Christian characters back to the mainstream. The star of The Amazing Spider-Man and The Social Network carried two of Crosswalk's Top 4 movies in 2016, both times playing Christians with strong convictions, albeit from very different backgrounds and time periods. Word is that these experiences made 2016 something of a spiritual journey for the actor himself. Christian characters also show up in other spots on our list this year, from movies about culture-changing African-American female mathematicians to documentaries about Australian bands responsible for many of your favorite worship songs to a couple of our Honorable Mentions. We fell in love with all of them. You'll find timely themes of adoption, dreams, sacrifice, courage, hope, conviction, family, love, joy, communication and faith below, too. In a year of incivility and division, these movies that moved us did not shy away from such difficulties but helped light a way home in colorful, powerful, often tear-inducing ways. But here's the bottom line: every film on our list below resonated in some way with what the seven of us, as Christians, notice when we encounter a work of art that has something to say, and we deliberate long over our selections. We invite you, however, before seeing any film we recommend, to visit our full review (just click on the title or the image) for a list of cautions and objectionable content. And so, without further ado, our editorial staff and film critics proudly present CROSSWALKMOVIES.COM'S TOP 10 FILMS (plus seven Honorable Mentions) OF 2016... (Click here to view our video version instead!)   googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-1'); }); 10 FINDING DORY Ryan's nutshell review: "Finding Dory has all the laughter and tears we've come to expect from a Pixar film. With beautiful animation, lovable characters, and a touching story about the bonds of family, this sequel is one of the best movies you'll see this summer. 4.5 out of 5." Here because: It's no secret we have a soft spot for Pixar movies. Inside Out was our #1 last year, and seven films from the studio have made our annual list going back to 2006. Dory only barely swam onto our list, however, since, as you'll see below, several of our panelists championed other animated fare. In the end, though, the themes of finding family, creating paths for the lost to find their way home, and recognizing the strengths in our disabilities won us over in typical Dory fashion! ~Shawn McEvoy See Also: Did You Catch These Cool Parenting Tips in Finding Dory?   9 CAPTAIN AMERICA: CIVIL WAR Susan's nutshell review: "'I'm going, but I don't want to see "my friends" fight,' said my companion. The battles are epic and the quips keep coming, but this dark story opens a wound in Team Avengers that may never completely heal. By all means see it, but expect to come away a little heart-heavy. 4 out of 5." Here because: Can we prop up this film about Marvel superheroes fighting each other without putting down the one about DC superheroes fighting each other? Sure can! Civil War featured superior writing, including clear motivations from characters acting in ways and with beliefs true to how they have been portrayed for several films now in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Everyone was given time to shine, and whether you were on Team Tony or Team Cap, you could still understand the points the other side was desperate to make. Not many superhero movies offer fun and creative battles and a real-world context and post-movie talking points all while remembering to sweeten everything with humor. Civil War reminds us: you may be powerful and you may even be right, but if you aren't strong, smart, humble or forgiving enough to achieve unity, everyone loses. ~Shawn McEvoy See Also: Captain America: Civil War - Best Ensemble Super Hero Movie Ever?   8 HILLSONG: LET HOPE RISE Shawn's nutshell review: "Writing worship music is hard! So is serving the Lord at times. What's easy is sitting back for the experience of Hillsong: Let Hope Rise, where we're invited not only to praise Jesus, but to get an intimate view into what it looks like to be authentic, unapologetic, hopeful Christians in a world longing for God. 4.5 out of 5." Here because: I remember the noise I made when I first heard there was a documentary being made about a worship team. I remember making a similar noise when the film had trouble finding a distributor. And then when Let Hope Rise finally came to theaters, I remember afterwards standing at my kitchen counter and tearfully telling my family I hadn't done enough with my life. The testimonies are inspiring, the effort and difficulty in creating biblical worship are astounding, and the worship itself glorifies God right there in the theater. May all believers be the subject of such a documentary about living out their calling. ~Shawn McEvoy See Also: Hillsong: Let Hope Rise is a Theatrical Worship Experience   7 LOVING Susan's nutshell review: "When two simple people who simply want to live in peace find themselves in the middle of a landmark Supreme Court case, their story unfolds with quiet grace, highlighting their commitment. Loving is not just the name of the featured couple in this biopic, it perfectly describes their story. 4 out of 5." Here because: For a movie that goes out of its way not to be emotionally manipulative, it speaks volumes that in its final moments I could feel my heart pounding in my chest, and tears welling up in my eyes. Loving is based on a true story of an interracial couple in the late 1950s American South sentenced to prison for co-habitating as man and wife, despite having been legally married in Washington D.C. It's about their legal battle but even more so their romance, and a life of quiet nobility. Director Jeff Nichols strikes an understated tone, finding power in intimate moments, never grand ones. Loving is about the people who weren't Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and it's a landmark elegy to them. ~Jeffrey Huston   6 LION Debbie's nutshell review: "With a riveting first half and probing questions about family, Lion's careful attention to life’s cruelty balanced with an inspiring tenderness and optimism make it a strong 4 out of 5." Here because: Lion is a journey so captivating, a story so deftly told, you will hardly believe that it actually happened. Tell the average person there may be as many as 800,000 abandoned children living on the streets of India, and the enormity of the suffering can overwhelm the mind. Yet Lion humanizes that suffering with the profound true story of one of those children. Five-year-old Saroo falls asleep alone on a train and ends up hundreds of miles from home and living on the streets of Kolkata. He isn't old enough to tell anyone where he's from or even who he is. Yet he becomes one of the fortunate ones, ending up in an orphanage from which he's adopted by an Australian couple. 25 years later, Saroo is plagued with anxiety over the family he lost and begins a quest to find them, piecing together what little he can remember about his earliest years. As complex as this character is, Saroo (played brilliantly by Dev Patel and newcomer Sunny Pawar) shines as one of this year's most emotionally moving characters. ~Stephen McGarvey See also: A Lost Son Searches for Home in Lion   5 ARRIVAL Susan's nutshell review: "This thinking person's alien movie is less about creatures from space and more about how humans communicate. Arrival cleverly and unexpectedly takes what you think you know and turns it on its head. It may not touch your heart, but it will provide plenty of material for after-movie conversations. 3 out of 5." Here because: It's the sci-fi movie 2016 desperately needed. First, Arrival turned the "alien movie" genre upside-down by making the central plot not about fighting for survival, but about language and communication. The personal narrative of Louise Banks, played so beautifully by Amy Adams, is highlighted by tender and smart storytelling techniques, which we've come to expect from director Denis Villeneuve (whose Prisoners made #9 on our 2013 list). Perhaps most significantly, Arrival accomplishes what films of this genre always should: it offers a fresh exhortation to humanity's struggles and weakness, using the power of the otherwordly metaphor. Like classic sci-fi from the '50s and '60s, it reminds us that the greatest danger to humanity will always be our own inner capacity for evil. Arrival speaks to our current world, one with more capacity for communication than ever. Will we use our mighty resources with patience and perseverance? Or will we continue to talk at and past one another, setting down the pen as we reach for the sword? ~Debbie Holloway   4 HACKSAW RIDGE Christian's nutshell review: "Old-fashioned in the best sense of the word—focusing on duty and patriotism—the film also feels contemporary in its post-Saving Private Ryan approach to war footage. Those who can endure it will find that Hacksaw Ridge pays off handsomely. 5 out of 5." Here because: What if, a year ago, I'd told you that Hollywood pariah Mel Gibson would direct a drama about the horrors of World War II's Pacific theater with a hero who was all at once a real person, a conscientious objector, a non-weapon-carrying medic and a Bible-quoting Seventh-Day Adventist... and this film would receive standing ovations at secular film festivals and be praised by both pacifists and war hawks alike? How in the world was THAT pulled off? Much of the credit goes to Andrew Garfield for his nuanced portrayal of Desmond Doss, and to the admirable beauty of the real Doss's own convictions. ~Shawn McEvoy See also: Freedom of Conscience on Hacksaw Ridge: A Story for Our Times   3 HIDDEN FIGURES Christian's nutshell review: "This film never comes across as a lecture as it tells the story of three African-American women employed as 'human computers' by NASA during the 1960s overcoming sexism and racial prejudice. It's instead an example of formulaic filmmaking done right—inspirational, enjoyable and educational. 4 out of 5." Here because: Much like Hacksaw Ridge, Hidden Figures is a movie that makes you genuinely wonder, "How have I never heard this story before?!" The best advancements civilizations make with their societal issues come when they are building toward something, in this case, the race for space. In such times where every hand is essential for pulling on the rope in one direction, we simply don't have time to get tied up in that rope due to ridiculous differences. The cream always rises in true meritocracies. But Hidden Figures isn't just about socieites or organizations learning to give their people - all their people - a chance to shine. It's about how these chances must be tirelessly fought for, sometimes loudly but always respectfully and often creatively, by incredible, courageous individuals. ~Shawn McEvoy See Also: Get the Girl to Do It: The Important Message of Hidden Figures   2 LA LA LAND Debbie's nutshell review: "Even more original and ambitious than it looked in the trailers, La La Land is a mixture of nostalgic musical numbers and compelling drama. While its leads have fantastic chemistry and the story draws us in, the song and dance numbers are occasionally jarring, landing the film at 3.5 out of 5." Here because: We think La La Land will and should win Best Picture; only a painfully-crafted, master work of faith could have bested it for our #1. This colorful, relatable, bittersweet film was everything we've been whining about not getting in film today. It's somehow both original and nostalgic as it chronicles the highs and lows of life, pondering what it is that makes dreams come true. Do we commit to dreams of art, or to love? Can we even hope to reach our artistic dreams without a lover to believe in and inspire us? Can we have it all, or do dreams require sacrifice? And how is that question answered when timing also has its part to play? The cinematography is inspired - at times light and color deliver punches, at times darkness becomes a soft blanket. The jazzy melodies that run and repeat through this film are pitch-perfect. La La Land has everything! Now, some do take aim at the ending; some complain it's not a true or complete musical, and some rightly note that Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling are not Debbie Reynolds and Gene Kelly. But if you've ever performed at all... or dreamed, or loved, or wondered, you'll be thinking about (and humming the tunes from) La La Land for a very long time. Damien Chazelle is fast becoming one of our favorite directors for what he has done here and in Whiplash (Honorable Mention on our 2014 list) with extremely low budgets. See Hollywood? We audiences don't require so much after all. ~Shawn McEvoy See Also: Why So Many People Loved La La Land... or Not   1 SILENCE Debbie's nutshell review: "No bit of Silence is an accident or an afterthought. This Martin Scorsese adaptation of a Japanese novel by Shûsaku Endô is difficult, slow and lacking in a traditionally satisfying resolution, but its strength as an adaptation and the powerful filmmaking and performances warrant 4 out of 5." Here because: [SPOILERS AHEAD] The title is no misnomer; this soundtrack-less movie (it instead features an "ambient soundscape") breathes in the quiet landscapes of 17th-century Japan. The audience is similarly silent, pondering the tests of life when God is, likewise, silent. Silence is truly a tale of "faith in its rawest form. Christians have long been enamored with the idea of 'glorious martyrdom,' but Silence quickly disabuses its viewers of any such notions. Like [Andrew Garfield's Father] Rodrigues, or maybe Peter if you need a biblical example, many Christians believe they are ready to suffer and die for Christ. Yet, when the time came, both men apostatized. Stripped of their pride and dignity, both thought themselves beyond the reach of God, only to discover God was still there. He had not only foreseen their betrayals, he had died to forgive them. How many of us would have the courage to rebuild a broken faith? How many of us would have the strength to endure? That is the great and terrible message which haunts every moment of Silence" ("Does Scorsese's Silence Promote Gospel or Blasphemy?"), and which earns it a place as Crosswalk's #1 Movie for 2016. ~Ryan Duncan & Shawn McEvoy See also: Scorsese's Silence: Prepare to Wrestle with Some of the Deepest Questions of the Christian Faith   HONORABLE MENTIONS (in alphabetical order) Each panelist's Honorable Mention is a film that was highly-rated on his or her personal list which didn't end up making it into the overall Crosswalk Top 10. I expected FLORENCE FOSTER JENKINS to be funny, and it was. I didn't expect it to be such a testament to the indomitable human spirit and the power of love. The fact that Florence (Meryl Streep) had no talent didn't stop her from doing what she loved. Meanwhile, her husband (Hugh Grant) and accompanist (Simon Helberg) loved Florence enough to make her dream come true, no matter what it cost them personally. It was hilarious and beautiful and sweet, filled with bravura performances and impressive keyboard skills. Florence's singing was off-key but her heart rang true and so does this delightful film. ~Susan Ellingburg JACKIE: A mesmerizing masterpiece of biopic risk-taking, director Pablo Larraín paints a psychological (rather than biographical) portrait of Jackie Kennedy in the days following JFK's assassination. It's a dramatization more pensive than narrative; expressionistic, not literal. Natalie Portman goes full Method in her transformation. Through her, Larraín's aesthetic comes alive, grieves, and resonates. Plus, these two refuse to peddle in sentimentality. Jackie is a singular immersion into the fragile yet resilient psyche of an iconic figure in the immediate aftermath of an American tragedy. ~Jeffrey Huston While not entirely emotionally satisfying, MANCHESTER BY THE SEA is a stirring and cathartic ode to grief, family, loss, and Massachusetts. The enthralling classical score, heartfelt performances, and lovely landscapes (and seascapes) make this a film to remember, if not one to casually enjoy with friends on a Friday night. It contained some of the most poignant - and most tragic - cinematic moments of 2016, and it's hard to find many flaws in the filmmaking. ~Debbie Holloway I’ll admit MOANA is fairly formulaic; the film gives off a bit of the typical princess/hero vibe that Disney is known for. It's certainly not as memorable as the wildly successful Frozen, or the hopelessly endearing Tangled. And yet, despite the familiar tropes of a hero's quest, Moana is a delightful version of the typical contemporary princess tale, beautifully set in the mythologies of native Pacific Island traditions. The main character is one kids can look up to and the secondary characters are colorful and hilarious. The animation is so thrillingly and painstakingly rendered that it's practically impossible to tell the difference between some scenes and actual video footage of the gorgeous islands they represent. This current golden age of Disney films has given us so many brilliant throwbacks to the classic Disney movies we all loved as kids. The makers of Moana should be proud that their work can take an honored place in that respected hall of fame. ~Stephen McGarvey QUEEN OF KATWE: In a year of fiery, acclaimed documentaries about the African-American experience, Disney's gentle, based-on-actual-events story of an African girl (no America here, and what's more, no "white savior" character through whose eyes we might have seen the story) who becomes a chess champion was largely overlooked by audiences. That's a shame. Adding to the vibrant, visual delights and triumphant storyline of director Mira Nair's film is a Hollywood rarity: Christian characters depicted as gentle, kind and admirable. ~Christian Hamaker Some have called it "The Case for Christ, 33 A.D." or "CSI: Jerusalem," but such monickers are too easy. RISEN is the Resurrection story we all treasure witnessed from an imagined but acceptable point of view - that of a Roman tribune tasked by Pilate with making sure Yeshua's tomb stays sealed and the populace remains at peace. Ah, yes, Peace... and what of Peace? Is there any way to come to know it via our own ambition, for us or for Joseph Fiennes' Clavius? What does doggedly tracking down Jesus Christ and his disciples do to a man? How can anyone ever be the same at the end of such a trail? Like the Gospels from which it takes its cues, Risen holds up to repeat viewings; I've seen it five times and continue to find it captivating. ~Shawn McEvoy On the surface, ZOOTOPIA appears to be just another kid's movie about talking animals, but take a closer look, and you'll discover so much more. Zootopia is a funny, thoughtful film about prejudice, labeling and fear, and their consequences on a society, particularly when exploited. This may sound like a tall order for young audiences to handle, yet thanks to some clever storytelling, animated wit and spot-on voice casting, the movie never gets lost in the message. Plus, sloths? Working at the DMV? These jokes practically write themselves. ~Ryan Duncan   OUR PAST WINNERS 2015: 1 - Inside Out; 2 - Spotlight; 3 - Room 2014: 1 - Selma; 2 - Calvary; 3 - The Grand Budapest Hotel2013: 1 - 12 Years a Slave; 2 - Gravity; 3 - Frozen2012: 1 - The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey; 2 - Lincoln; 3 - Les Misérables2011: 1 - Hugo; 2 - The Help; 3 - Moneyball2010: 1 - Inception; 2 - True Grit; 3 - The King's Speech2009: 1 - Fantastic Mr. Fox; 2 - Up; 3 - Star Trek2008: 1 - Wall-E; 2 - The Dark Knight; 3 - Slumdog Millionaire2007: 1 - Ratatouille; 2 - Amazing Grace; 3 - The Bourne Ultimatum2006: 1 - The Pursuit of Happyness; 2 - The Nativity Story; 3 - United 93 / World Trade Center2005: 1 - Cinderella Man; 2 - Because of Winn-Dixie; 3 - Batman Begins   CRITIC'S CHOICE We also asked each of our panelists to name his or her selections for the various categories below. RYAN DUNCAN, Culture EditorBest Animated Film - MoanaBest Family Film - ZootopiaBest Date Movie - Kubo and the Two StringsBest Action Flick - DeadpoolBest Film with a Faith Theme - SilenceBest Faith-Based Film (i.e. 'Christian Movie') - Risen Favorite Male Performance - Andrew Garfield, Hacksaw RidgeFavorite Female Performance - Emma Stone, La La LandMost Disappointing - (tie) The Nice Guys & Captain FantasticMost Pleasant Surprise - ZootopiaI Laughed - Hail, Caesar!I Cried - Silence SUSAN ELLINGBURG, Film CriticBest Animated Film - Finding DoryBest Family Film - Finding DoryBest Date Movie - PassengersBest Action Flick - Star Trek: BeyondBest Film with a Faith Theme - Patriots DayBest Faith-Based Film (i.e. 'Christian Movie') - Risen Favorite Male Performance - Simon Helberg, Florence Foster JenkinsFavorite Female Performance - Meryl Streep, Florence Foster JenkinsMost Disappointing - The FounderMost Pleasant Surprise - Money MonsterI Laughed - Florence Foster JenkinsI Cried - Patriots Day CHRISTIAN HAMAKER, Film CriticBest Animated Film - Kubo and the Two StringsBest Family Film - LovingBest Date Movie - The Light Between OceansBest Action Flick - Hacksaw RidgeBest Film with a Faith Theme - Hacksaw RidgeBest Faith-Based Film (i.e. 'Christian Movie') - Last Days in the DesertFavorite Male Performance - Ewan McGregor, Last Days in the DesertFavorite Female Performance - Natalie Portman, JackieMost Disappointing - Rules Don't ApplyMost Pleasant Surprise - Finding DoryI Laughed - Central IntelligenceI Cried - Hidden Figures DEBBIE HOLLOWAY, Film CriticBest Animated Film - Kubo and the Two StringsBest Family Film - The Little PrinceBest Date Movie - La La LandBest Action Flick - Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find ThemBest Film with a Faith Theme - Queen of KatweBest Faith-Based Film (i.e. 'Christian Movie') - Silence Favorite Male Performance - Sunny Pawar, LionFavorite Female Performance - Michelle Williams, Manchester by the SeaMost Disappointing - My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2Most Pleasant Surprise - Keeping Up with the JonesesI Laughed - Bad MomsI Cried - Manchester by the Sea JEFFREY HUSTON, Film CriticBest Animated Film - MoanaBest Family Film - The BFGBest Date Movie - La La LandBest Action Flick - 13 HoursBest Film with a Faith Theme - SilenceBest Faith-Based Film (i.e. 'Christian Movie') - Miracles from Heaven Favorite Male Performance - Casey Affleck, Manchester by the SeaFavorite Female Performance - Amy Adams, ArrivalMost Disappointing - Suicide SquadMost Pleasant Surprise - Hidden FiguresI Laughed - TrollsI Cried - Loving SHAWN McEVOY, Managing EditorBest Animated Film - Kubo and the Two StringsBest Family Film - Hidden FiguresBest Date Movie - La La LandBest Action Flick - Captain America: Civil WarBest Film with a Faith Theme - SilenceBest Faith-Based Film (i.e. 'Christian Movie') - Risen Favorite Male Performance - Andrew Garfield, SilenceFavorite Female Performance - Emma Stone, La La LandMost Disappointing - SingMost Pleasant Surprise - Hillsong: Let Hope RiseI Laughed - Florence Foster JenkinsI Cried - Queen of Katwe STEPHEN McGARVEY, Editor-in-ChiefBest Animated Film - MoanaBest Family Film - Hidden FiguresBest Date Movie - La La LandBest Action Flick - Rogue One: A Star Wars StoryBest Film with a Faith Theme - SilenceBest Faith-Based Film (i.e. 'Christian Movie') - Hillsong: Let Hope Rise Favorite Male Performance - Andrew Garfield, SilenceFavorite Female Performance - Emma Stone, La La LandMost Disappointing - Batman v Superman: Dawn of JusticeMost Pleasant Surprise - 13 HoursI Laughed - TrollsI Cried - Lion   OUR MOST POPULAR REVIEWS OF 2016 The films you the audience wanted to know about  - and clicked on - the most. 12. The Light Between Oceans, by Christian Hamaker 11. Miracles from Heaven, by Susan Ellingburg 10. The Young Messiah, by Jeffrey Huston 9. Zootopia, by Ryan Duncan 8. 13 Hours, by Susan Ellingburg 7. Suicide Squad, by Jeffrey Huston 6. God's Not Dead 2, by Christian Hamaker 5. Ben-Hur, by Susan Ellingburg 4. Hillsong: Let Hope Rise, by Shawn McEvoy 3. Top Films of 2015, by Editorial Staff & Film Critics 2. Risen, by Ryan Duncan 1. Deadpool, by Christian Hamaker Finally, we'd like to thank you for your readership (and viewership of our video reviews) in 2016, especially as we kicked off our new format for text reviews, including star ratings and defined sections to make it easier for you to find what you need to know about any film. Speaking of which, three films in 2016 were given perfect 5-star ratings from our reviewers: Hacksaw Ridge (by Christian Hamaker), Florence Foster Jenkins (by Susan Ellingburg) and Moana (by Ryan Duncan), so it was good to see each of those films represented here! It was an excellent year at CrosswalkMovies.com, ChristianMovieReviews.com and the CMR Facebook page. If you enjoyed this article or our regular reviews, please be sure to share them with your friends and family! From one set of Christian movie fans to another, thanks for a great year, God bless, and let us hear your reviews of the films listed here! googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-2'); }); if (gptClientWidth >= 992 && gptClientWidth <= 1000000) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-3'); }); Publication date: February 9, 2017 ]]>
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  • 10 Films We're Looking Forward to in 2016
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Movies Let’s be honest, 2015 was a pretty dismal year for movies. Sure, we saw the renewal of great franchises like Star Wars and Jurassic Park, but we also had to suffer through the disappointment of high-profile films like Tomorrowland and The Good Dinosaur. Still, a new year means new movies, and as is tradition here at Crosswalk, it’s time to look ahead to the most promising candidates of 2016. Here, in no particular order, are the ten movies we’re looking forward to in 2016.   Hail, Caesar! Current Release Date: February 5th, 2016 Stars: Josh Brolin, George Clooney, Alden Ehrenreich, Ralph Fiennes, Jonah Hill, Scarlett Johansson, Tilda Swinton, Channing Tatum   googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-1'); }); 2016’s first major comedy, Hail, Caesar!, features a cavalcade of stars and a self-deprecating premise that’s just too good to miss. When the lead actor of a major motion picture is kidnapped by a mysterious group calling itself “The Future”, a Hollywood agent (played by Josh Brolin) must find a way to raise $100,000 to secure his release. Things grow even more complicated however, as he’s forced to deal with overbearing directors, scheming gossip columnists, dimwitted actors, and everything else Hollywood can throw at him.   Risen Current Release Date: February 19th, 2016 Stars:Joseph Fiennes, Tom Felton, Peter Firth Cliff Curtis Risen is already making waves in Christian circles for its stirring trailer. The story follows a Roman Centurion (Joseph Fiennes) who is charged by Pontius Pilate to investigate the disappearance of Christ’s body and quell an imminent uprising in Jerusalem. Risen is being billed as a Biblical noir mystery, and honestly, the whole film looks amazing. Christians should keep a sharp eye on this movie, it may just redefine the faith-based genre.   Zoolander 2 Current Release Date: February 12, 2016 Stars: Ben Stiller, Owen Wilson, Will Ferrell, Penelope Cruz, Kristen Wiig, Fred Armisen The boys are back and looking better than ever. Most audiences will remember the first Zoolander as a zany, nonsensical, off-the-walls-comedy, and it appears the sequel promises more of the same. This time around, Derek Zoolander (Ben Stiller) and his friend Hansel (Owen Wilson) are recruited by Interpol to discover who is assassinating the world’s most beautiful people. Better start practicing your “Blue Steel”, cus things are gonna get crazy!   God’s Not Dead 2 Current Release Date: April 1, 2016 Stars: Melissa Joan Hart, Jesse Metcalfe, Ray Wise, Ernie Hudson   The Christian phenomenon which swept box offices in 2014 will return this April with a brand new installment. Reversing positions from the previous film, God’s Not Dead 2 focuses on a high school teacher (Melissa Joan Hart) who is drawn into an epic court case after quoting the Bible in class. The movie plans to explore issues like religious freedom, persecution, prayer in public schools, and their effects in modern society. For now, Christians can only wait eagerly until it arrives on April 1st.   Snowden Current Release Date: May 13, 2016 Stars: Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Shailene Woodley, Melissa Leo, Zachary Quinto, Nicolas Cage, Based on true events, Snowden chronicles the life of Edward Snowden and his actions leading up to one of the largest classified information leaks in history. Though the film itself is bound to be controversial, the stellar cast list demands attention. With names like Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Zachary Quinto, and Nicholas Cage attached to the project, Snowden will be interesting to say the least.   Silence Current Release Date: (?) 2016 Stars: Adam Driver, Liam Neeson, Andrew Garfield, Ciarán Hinds, Unlike the other faith-based movies on this list, Silence appears more reminiscent of 2014’s Calvary. The tone is much darker, and the story promises difficult questions about faith, forgiveness, and survival. The film’s plot takes place in the seventeenth century, where two Jesuit priests travel to Japan hoping to find their mentor and spread the Gospel of Christ. Instead, they are met with violence, persecution, and an uncertain future.   Literally EVERY Superhero Movie Current Release Dates: Various Stars: Everyone, just…everyone Superheroes have long since become a prime staple of the film industry, but 2016 is apparently the year where studios are slapping a cape and spandex on just about everything. First up is Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice, the first major film from the D.C universe (Green Lantern doesn’t count), which will probably set the stage for the villainous Suicide Squad later this year. Meanwhile, 20th Century Fox will unveil its 9thX-Men film along with the much-anticipated release of Deadpool. Finally, Marvel is hoping to capitalize on one of its more popular storylines with Captain America: Civil War before introducing audiences to a new hero in Dr. Strange. All things considered, you should probably brush up on your comic book lore, you’re going to need it.   Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them Current Release Date: November 18th, 2016 Stars: Eddie Redmayne, Katherine Waterson, Alison Sudol, Dan Fogler, Ezra Miller   J.K. Rowling brings the wizarding world of Harry Potter stateside in this upcoming fantasy-drama based on the book of the same name. Unlike the other Potter movies, Fantastic Beasts revolves around the famed wizard-zoologist Newt Scamander and his adventures in 1926 New York. Though some Christians will be hesitant to engage Rowling’s world a second time, fans will no doubt be overjoyed at the chance to revisit their favorite series in an exciting new location. Viewers can expect plenty of callbacks (or callforwards?) to the original films, and maybe even an appearance from everyone’s favorite wizard.   Moana Current Release Date: November 23, 2016 Stars: Auli’i Cravalho, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Alan Tudyk Despite the horde of live-action remakes Disney has clogging up its schedule, it’s nice to see the studio hasn’t completely given up on original projects. Moana is Disney’s latest addition to their animated royalty. Set in ancient Oceania, the movie follows a young girl named Moana as she seeks to become a famous navigator. Along her journey, she teams up with a legendary fisherman named Maui, who helps her explore the surrounding islands. Will this new princess put an end to Frozen’s icy reign? Probably not, but it looks fun anyway.   Finding Dory Current Release Date: June 17, 2016 Stars: Ellen DeGeneres, Albert Brooks, Diane Keaton, Eugene Levy, Ed O’Neill, Ty Burrell, Kaitlin Olson, Not long ago, Crosswalk named Finding Nemo our top Pixar movie of all time. With beautiful animation and a story packed full of emotional moments, it was easy to see how Finding Nemo wasn’t just a good movie, it’s the reason we watch movies. It should be no surprise then, that we’re anticipating the sequel to Pixar’s ocean-spanning masterpiece. As the name suggests, Finding Dory will focus on the Royal Tang, Dory, as she searches for her lost family. Pixar has demonstrated before that they can make a sequel which surpasses the original, we can only hope the same holds true here.   What about you? What movies are you looking forward to in 2016? Leave your comments in the space below! *Ryan Duncan is the Entertainment Editor for Crosswalk.com googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-2'); }); if (gptClientWidth >= 992 && gptClientWidth <= 1000000) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-3'); }); **Published 1/19/2016 ]]>
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  • Crosswalk's Top 10 Movies of 2016: Did Your Favorite Make the List?
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Movies Just in time for Oscar weekend, Shawn and Steve from CrosswalkMovies.com explain why each of these 10 fabulous movies from 2016 has something to offer the Christian audience. Let us know your favorite, and what you think should have made the cut! Click here for the full text version]]>
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  • CrosswalkMovies.com LIVE: Top Movies of 2016 Recap
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Movies It's Oscar season and Crosswalk's Shawn and Steve talk about their favorite films from 2016. We've just released our own Top 10 list - go to CrosswalkMovies.com to check it out.]]>
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Richard Spencer1
NPI / Radix



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

⚠️ EDGY 🔥 CONTENT 🔥 WARNING 🔥 (NSFW?) ⚠️

🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻


  • White Washing | "Captain America Civil War" @ 0:00 | "The Rocketeer" @ 48:00
    Paul Kersey joins Richard to discuss comic-book movies. http://www.radixjournal.com/
    Archive Mirror link here.
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Plugged In15
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Captain America: Civil War
    Action/AdventureSci-Fi/FantasyDrama We hope this review was both interesting and useful. Please share it with family and friends who would benefit from it as well.Movie ReviewNobody's perfect. Sure, it's a cliché, but we know it's true. We make our share of mistakes. But, as painful as those missteps can be, they're rarely matters of life and death. If I've miscounted the swear words for this movie review, my editor may yell, but he won't call for a Congressional investigation. I hope. But if you're an Avenger, the consequences of imperfection can be far greater. For years, the Avengers—both separately and collectively—have saved the world time and time again. They've rescued thousands, millions, even billions of people from terrible fates. But their unsanctioned do-gooding has not come without cost. Innocent people are sometimes still inside those exploding buildings and falling cars. Sure, maybe the Avengers mean well, but that's not much solace to the folks who've lost their husbands and wives, parents and children. And the world begins to wonder whether it's such a good idea to let a handful of superhuman individuals—each one a frighteningly emotional weapon of mass destruction—to run loose across the earth without any safeguards. And so the civilized world draws up the Sokovia Accords—an agreement between the planet and the superheroes who protect it. It curtails, essentially, any more unauthorized acts of heroism: If you wanna save the world, you're gonna have to get permission. Heroes don't have to sign, mind you. No one's going to twist Hulk's arm (because, really, who'd have hands big enough?). But for those who don't … well, we'll get to that soon enough. Many heroes, including Iron Man, support the Accords. He believes that even superheroes—especially superheroes, perhaps—could use a little accountability. But others, including Captain America, aren't so sure. Organizations, however well-meaning, have a tendency to foster their own agendas. Even the good ones may dither and delay, costing more lives. "We may not be perfect," Cap argues, "but the safest hands are our own." The Accords will be passed, of course, whether the good Captain likes 'em or not. But during the signing ceremony, tragedy strikes: A bomb goes off, killing dozens. It's not long before news agencies broadcast the picture of the presumed bomber: the Winter Soldier, aka Bucky Barnes, aka Captain America's one-time best friend. The world launches a worldwide manhunt and orders Accords-signing superheroes to stand down. Regular old soldiers will bring down the Winter Soldier, and they mean to do so quite literally. They have orders to shoot on sight—and shoot to kill. Cap can't let that happen to his old pal—especially not when he doesn't think Bucky's even responsible for the bombing. So he slaps on his suit, picks up his shield and dives into the fray once again. And while he believes he's still fighting for truth, justice and the American way, this time that belief puts him on the wrong side of the law. But how is that law going to bring Cap in? Seems like you'd need a man made of iron to even try.Positive ElementsAs we can gather from the title, Captain America: Civil War pits hero against hero—a Technicolor battle centered around issues we struggle with today. But let's not lose sight of the fact that most of these heroes still have the same basic goals in mind: to protect the innocent, bring the guilty to justice and make the world a safer place. Some, like Iron Man, believe that such a greater good can best be reached by submitting to a legal authority. Cap, for his part, is determined to save Bucky's life, no matter the cost. And others just want to preserve this strange, oddly loving family that the Avengers has become. But these supers are human, too, and emotions come into play. [Spoiler Warning] In that regard, here's one example of how a bad beginning gets worked out in the end: King T'Challa (Black Panther) is introduced as a guy out for revenge, hoping to kill the man he believes killed his dearly beloved father. But as the dust settles, he comes to see that revenge is not the way forward. "Vengeance has consumed you," he tells an evildoer. "It is consuming them. I'm done letting it consume me."Spiritual ContentSpeaking of T'Challa, he talks about how his "culture" believes in an afterlife full of green meadows where the dead can run to their hearts' content. It was something his father believed, T'Challa suggests—but then adds that he is not his father. A funeral takes place in a big, beautiful church.Sexual ContentCaptain America smooches secret agent Sharon Carter—a kiss Cap believes is long "overdue." (Says a guy who is technically close to 100 years old and once had a thing for Peggy Carter, Sharon's now elderly aunt.)Recommended ResourceA Chicken's Guide to Talking Turkey With Your Kids About SexKevin LemanEven the bravest parents feel timid about discussing sex with their 8- to 14-year-olds! This resource offers reassuring, humorous, real-life anecdotes along with reliable information to help you with this challenging task.Buy NowViolent ContentCivil War is filled with scenes of frenetic, intense action—mostly on par with what we've seen in Marvel's previous superhero movies overseen by Disney (which discounts the X-Men and Fantastic Four franchises, and, of course, Deadpool). There's very little blood seen, but because the movie is predicated on describing the costs of fighting even righteous fights, it can feel more visceral and jarring. And while some of our heroes do their best not to kill anyone, not all Avengers (Natasha, we're looking at you) have such a strict policy. One man drowns while being suspended above a slowly filling sink. Another is found in a bathtub, dead. (We see the silhouette of his hand on the closed shower curtain.) Several people are discovered with bullet holes in their foreheads. Someone falls to the ground and is gravely injured. Someone else essentially blows himself up—killing several innocents in the process. We see footage from several deadly cataclysms, and the camera lingers on one young victim, her visible eye staring vacantly. Survivors share their grief and anger over who they lost. Superheroes fight lots of bad guys and, often, one another, too. People are punched, kicked, battered, bruised, flung, crunched … and webbed. Sometimes these battles can feel light, almost like the adversaries are playing a football game and will share a soda at halftime. But there comes a point at which things get personal: Heroes look as if they want to kill. Cars crash, sometimes in spectacular fashion. They fall from a garage, hurtling down toward the superhero dodging below. A super gets thrown through several floors/ceilings and continues to careen downward through much of the earth's crust. We see floors strewn with bodies incapacitated by gas. A deadly biological weapon is nearly released. Crude or Profane LanguageFive s-words. Close to 10 uses of "h---," six of "a--," two each of "b--ch" and "d--n," and one "p---." God's name is misused at least 10 times, twice with "d--n." Jesus' name is abused once.Drug and Alcohol ContentNone.Other Negative ElementsLots of laws are broken, and not even always for a greater good. Superheroes and others are denied due legal process.ConclusionBy now, we all pretty much know what Disney's Marvel movies look like. Sure, there are variances, with Captain America: The Winter Soldier swinging a bit darker, say, or Iron Man 3 more salacious. But for the most part, they follow a rather reliable template: frenetic action, lots of dead bodies but not so much blood, unfortunate smatterings of the s-word, and a welcome allotment of team-spirit banter to lighten the mood. And, of course, you've got lots of superheroes doing their hero thing. Captain America: Civil War comfortably follows the CGI-enhanced template, but with one interesting change. Here, the superheroes fight one another—and without losing their heroic bona fides. Each one is doing what he or she believes is right while disagreeing vehemently over what right looks like. And that makes this superhero movie (a genre not exactly known for its depth) a potential springboard into thoughtful conversations. "My faith is in people, I guess," Captain America says. He believes that good people with good motives—folks like himself—can be trusted to do good things. There's a lot of America in Captain America's philosophy—an appreciation for rugged individuality, an adherence to personal rights and freedom, a belief that people can usually be trusted to make the right decision when the decision matters most. But Christians can't really share that sunny optimism. Yep. You read that right. While Captain America would grant that nobody's perfect, biblical teaching goes further: We are born sinners, and without Christ, we are inclined, without defense, to indulge our rotten nature. We fail. We fall. We need help to be good. And before the movie is over, the actions of some seem to prove this point. Tony Stark, the Iron Man who's struggled mightily with his own flaws, knows just how imperfect we can be. He believes that all of us, even superheroes, need to be held accountable for our actions. He believes that submitting to, in this case, the oversight of a governmental authority is the best way forward. Iron Man is making a Plugged In kind of point in this. "Let every person be subject to the governing authorities," Romans 13 tells us. And let's face it: If you pull a Captain America-like move and shelter your on-the-lam Aunt Mabel because you're sure she wouldn't have knocked off that liquor store, you'd be rightly in trouble yourself. Romans goes on to say that those authorities were "instituted by God," but of course we know they're not perfect, either. They can be petty. They can dither. And as Captain America learns in his previous movie, The Winter Soldier, they can be horrifically corrupt. "Compromise where you can," we hear. "But when you can't, don't." When it comes to the idea of the government killing a potentially innocent man, Cap can't compromise. He might even point to a Bible verse of his own (found in James 4): "So whoever knows the right thing to do and fails to do it, for him it is a sin." We can love people, but we know they may fail. We should submit to authority, even as we know it can be deeply flawed. Both sapien and system can let us down. Nobody's perfect. Well, except for one guy. When it comes to faith, the solution isn't to place it in people, as Cap would, or government, like Iron Man does, but in the capital Him. And Him alone. Civil War doesn't say that, of course. Which is why I already wrote about having those thoughtful conversations.Pro-social ContentObjectionable ContentSummary AdvisoryPlot SummaryChristian BeliefsOther Belief SystemsAuthority RolesProfanity/ViolenceKissing/Sex/HomosexualityDiscussion TopicsAdditional Comments/NotesEpisode Reviews]]>
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  • How Stan Lee Changed the World
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    As you’ve probably heard by now, Stan Lee died yesterday at the age of 95. Many have eulogized Lee as a “comics legend,” and that’s wholly fair. As a writer, editor, publisher and eventually chairman of Marvel Comics, he created or co-created some of the world’s most famous superheroes and helped redefine the genre itself. […]

    The post How Stan Lee Changed the World appeared first on Plugged In Blog.

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  • Plugged In Movie Awards: Best Movie For Teens
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Another day, another batch of nominees! This time we turn to movies for teens. It’s a perennially tricky category to pick for, and this year yields a truly eclectic mix of movies, pitting some of the year’s top-grossing flicks against a couple of little-seen gems. As always, read our full reviews before you or anyone in your family decide to watch any of these films. And as always, we’d love to get your input. Vote for your favorites either here or on our Facebook page. We’ll close voting on Feb. 20.  A week later, we’ll announce the winners—both those chosen by Plugged In and those you vote for. Captain America: Civil War: It’s tough to be a hero. Sure, it’s great that the Avengers have saved the world time and again. But should that world just trust the good guys to make good decisions all the time? Aren’t superheroes human, too? Isn’t it about time that the planet put some sort of a muzzle—or at least a leash—on the planet’s superhuman do-gooders? Such is the premise of this closet Avengers movie, one that pits Cap against old pal Iron Man and stuffs more superheroes into it than the average 8-year-old boy puts in his toy box. Civil War is a darker, more morally complex story than we’re used to from Marvel. Instead of evildoers from outer space, our heroes must battle each other, and we moviegoers are asked to take sides. Sure, Civil War still offers plenty of high-flying action and not a small amount of fun. It has a few pain points, too, from its expected violence to it sometimes salty language. But this movie makes you think a little, too, and that’s a good thing. A Monster Calls: The monster that comes calling here really isn’t the foreboding, tree-like entity you might have seen in this film’s trailers. Oh, that thing’s monstrous, to be sure. So much so that sensitive young viewers might be overwhelmed by images of it. But the real monster in this story is the one 12-year-old Conor’s mom bravely faces: cancer. Conor struggles mightily to come to grips with the monstrous emotions of fear and grief and guilt swirling in his heart. Despite its pseudo horror-movie trappings, A Monster Calls is a remarkably tender, psychologically insightful tale, one that could be especially resonant for tweens and teens who’ve gone through significant losses of their own. Queen of Katwe: Phiona Mutesi had no reason to hope for much. Indeed, born and raised in one of Uganda’s poorest slums, she had little reason for hope at all. But when a mission-minded soccer coach named Robert Katende opens a chess club in the heart of the slum, Phiona displays a rare grasp of the game. Soon this uneducated girl is beating well-heeled opponents who’d been honing their chess skills since childhood, and she begins taking on the country’s best. Disney’s Queen of Katwe, based on the true story of the world’s most unlikely chess master, is a quietly beautiful tale undergirded by a subtle, unshakeable sense of faith. Admittedly, in a year in which the Mouse House released a bevy of box-office blockbusters, Queen barely made a squeak. Turns out, one of Disney’s quietest 2017 releases just might be one of its best, too. Race: Jesse Owens is fast—so fast, in fact, that he could be one of the star performers at the 1936 Olympics. The catch: Those Olympics are being held in Berlin, and Germany’s Nazi government isn’t exactly known for its racial tolerance. Should the United States even go to the Olympics, given the host country’s horrific policies? And if it does, should Owens—whose own country still suffers from plenty of racial injustice of its own—agree to participate? Race, released last February, probably slipped off a lot of moviegoers’ radars, and that’s a shame. Despite a peppering of profanity, Jesse Owens’ story is inspiring. He knows he can’t please everyone no matter what choice he makes. But Owens’ decision to use his gift—and the classy manner in which he uses it—reminds us that we’ve all been given gifts from God. And it reminds us to use them in the right way, emphasizing what a shame it would be to squander them. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story: So just how did the Rebel Alliance pilfer plans for the Death Star anyway? Rogue One: A Star Wars Story answers that question. Set prior to the events in Star Wars: Episode IV – A New Hope, Rogue One tells the tale of Jyn Erso. She’s a fierce young woman the Rebels recruit to find her father, whom they suspect has designed the Death Star. But he’s also baked in a weakness that he hopes his daughter can discover. Rogue One delivers a satisfying story, especially for longtime fans. It’s full of sanitized Star Wars-style combat as well as some depictions of gritty guerilla warfare. Those are issues families will want to consider, as is the film’s slightly more personal characterization of The Force. That said, heroism, bravery and sacrifice are all once again on display in the latest story from a galaxy far, far away. Movie synopses by Paul Asay and Adam Holz. ]]>
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Michael Medved1



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Captain America: Civil War
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Debbie Schlussel1
The New York Post



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Weekend Box Office: Captain America: Civil War – A PC Mess, But Still Better Than The Rest
    Blog Posts Movie Reviews * My jaw dropped when a character says Captain America is “off the reservation.” It’s funny how both Hillary Clinton and Hollywood liberals can get away with using this politically-incorrect phrase that makes American Indians cringe, but if Donald Trump had said it, all hell would break loose. * I could’ve done without Anthony Mackie as “The Falcon,” accusing someone of trying to frame him and describing the person as “getting all Mark Fuhrman on my ass.” Um, Mark Fuhrman, a detective and witness at the O.J. Simpson trial, never planted evidence or framed anyone. He didn’t plant Simpson’s blood on the gloves that were found at the scene, nor did he plant the gloves themselves, despite what race-card player Johnny Cochran implied at the trial. But, sadly, the moronic masses who see this movie will believe that with this latest reference claiming there was some sort of frame-up of O.J. Simpson. Did we really need this “Black Lives Matter” BS in the movie? Nope. * At one point, Cap says that the superheroes who were not born in America are not U.S. citizens so they will be deported. Newsflash: we aren’t deporting anyone. And here’s another tip: the illegal aliens in this country are for the most part, neither super nor heroes. They are criminals and lawbreakers, job-stealers, and welfare-and-entitlements parasites. Some are terrorists. Others are drunk drivers, rapists, and murderers. I have yet to see an illegal alien with a single superpower. Sorry. * As a Russian speaker, I can tell you the Russian in this movie is a joke. Ditto for the in-and-out Eastern European accent of Elizabeth Olsen as “The Scarlet Witch.” Like I said, this movie is kind of a mess, too long, and with too many characters and silly reasons for their contrived fights. That said, it’s better than the previous “Captain America” movie, “The Winter Soldier” (read my review). And the major superhero-versus-superhero civil war fight scene is entertaining if a little drawn out and contrived. This isn’t a great movie. Not even close. It barely has a plot. And it’s not something I’d pay ten-bucks-plus to see. But at least “Cap” (again, very annoying that he’s not referred to as Captain AMERICA!) has the good sense to see what a joke the United Nations and its treaties are. HALF A REAGAN ]]>
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Acculturated2
Acculturated



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • 'Captain America: Civil War' Puts Humanity Before Spectacle
    For moviegoers still reeling from the execrable Batman v. Superman, the latest installment of the Captain America franchise (Civil War) is here to redeem your faith in the superhero movie genre. There’s more uniting the two movies than you’d guess from the intra-Avenger fisticuffs in the trailer. But Civil War takes on its dark themes with far more humanity and grace than Batman v. Superman was able to muster. This a movie that has its superheroes battle in ways that stay true to their individual characters and moral arcs, rather than turning them all into hyper-aggressive human monster trucks crashing into one another. Directors Joe and Anthony Russo weave together threads and characters from many previous Marvel films into a sprawling narrative that doesn’t neglect individual stories. This film finds Captain America (Chris Evans) at odds with half his superhero allies when he resists government attempts to regulate superheroes. With the tension mounting, Cap goes AWOL to protect his friend Bucky (Sebastian Stan), who’s been turned into the brainwashed assassin the Winter Soldier. Bucky is trying to find a way to live with what he’s done and figure out who he is now—hard to do when a villain frames you for a terrorist attack and a half-dozen superheroes led by Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.) are prepared to bring you into custody. When Cap recruits his own team to save Bucky, battles, betrayals, and bombshells ensue. The conflict is not so much about the specifics of the superhero regulations (the Sokovia Accords, which are never fully explained in the movie, require the Avengers to submit to UN Security Council approval, among other things) as it is about trust. Cap trusts his instincts, trusts that his love for Bucky will be able to bring that lost soul back from the brink, and doesn’t trust that the government will make the right call. His entire philosophy is summed up a line paraphrased from the comics (but re-contextualized as a last message from Cap’s best gal Peggy Carter): “When the mob and the press and the whole world tell you to move, your job is to plant yourself like a tree beside the river of truth, and tell the whole world, ‘No, you move.’” Meanwhile Tony Stark, a.k.a. Iron Man, is grappling with guilt over the collateral damage he caused in previous superhero battles, and has lost his girlfriend Pepper because he won’t follow through on his promise to hang up his armor and retire. He can’t trust himself, and as a result he’s eager to hand power and responsibility over to other people. He’s seeking absolution by having a higher power take the wheel. Sadly for Cap, that power is the United Nations. Neither character or side is totally wrong, nor totally right, and this ambiguity is part of the movie’s appeal. People with superpowers aren’t automatically trustworthy, nor are they wise decision-makers (as the characters themselves manage to make clear). But governments also have a terrible track record at using power responsibly, as is demonstrated in this movie when the Secretary of State orders Bucky to be shot on sight for a crime he didn’t commit. What the initial conflict in the movie sets off and then tests are the genuine friendships that exist among these characters—friendships that have developed over several films. It means something for Black Widow to be at odds with Captain America when we’ve previously seen the spy and the super-soldier grow to respect and trust each other. Not to harp on the comparison, but this does seem more effective than Batman v. Superman’s approach, where Superman and Wonder Woman share a grand total of one exchange. The Avengers in this movie aren’t perfect specimens of power. They’re shell-shocked saviors. They wear bright colors and have witty exchanges but are still painted as people buckling a little under the weight of the world. Without making them so detached from humanity that we lose sympathy with them (which was a problem for, you guessed it, Superman in Batman v. Superman), the writers portray the superheroes as unsure about their place in society. This is why they’ve formed surrogate families, mainly with other super-people, and why testing the bonds of those families is so painful. The film goes to some heartbreaking places, but in ways that feel earned—and there is enough light-heartedness and derring-do sprinkled in to make it feel balanced. (It even finds time to introduce an impressionable young Spider-Man who knows that with great power comes great responsibility, and a regal Black Panther who finally shuns the path of revenge that tempts him). Like all recent superhero movies, Civil War tackles themes of responsibility, grief, and trauma. But it foregoes a clichéd, city-leveling climax and instead focuses on the humanity of its characters. It’s The Empire Strikes Back of the Marvel Cinematic Universe: it puts our heroes through a dramatic wringer, but leaves us a glimmer of hope. After all, if the Avengers, despite their struggles, have managed to inspire Spider-Man, then heroism must have a future in their universe.           ]]>
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The American Conservative Staff3
The American Conservative



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • America At The Movies 2016The American Conservative

    133 Responses to America At The Movies 2016 ← Older Comments. ... I came expecting a review of, or commentary on, a cool movie and all we got was “Some jerks were in line, we were too afraid ...

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  • America At The Movies 2016
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    LGBT Broken Windows Moments I just got a phone call from an old friend in north Texas. She does a lot of work with law enforcement, especially in the area of domestic violence counseling and response. I hope she will not mind me saying, but she’s a tough Texas chick. She called to tell me what she and her teenage son dealt with last night at the movies in Frisco, a prosperous suburb of Dallas. “I thought I knew what was going on in this country,” she said. “I was wrong.” She had taken her teenage son to see the Captain America: Civil War movie for his birthday. In line behind them waiting to buy tickets stood several men in their early 30s who were obviously transgendered, and a young woman who presented as a man, though was plainly a female. My friend, “N.”, said the group started talking about sex, including their favorite positions, their favorite sex toys, you name it. One of the group was 20; an older transgender said to him, “You’re just a kid now, but when you turn 21, we’re going to take you out and get you broken in.” They proposed an orgy. On and on like this. And more transgenders joined them, not waiting in line, but moving towards the front to stand with their friends. N. told me that the trans group was very aware of itself, and did not care who heard their filthy talk. N. said, “I’ve been molested. I’ve been raped. If this had been a group of men talking that way about their sexual adventures, I wouldn’t have had any problem going up to them and asking them to tone it down. But I was scared of this group. They were so angry. You could feel it coming off of them.” “Why didn’t you go to the theater management and ask them to say something to the transgenders?” I said. “Because the group would have known it was me,” she said. “I would have had to have left the line. Plus, in this environment, I doubted that they would have done anything. Nobody wants to risk being called a bigot.” She said that after they went into the theater, but before the movie started, the trans group continued their foul, verbally abusive behavior. N. asked her son if he wanted to go to the bathroom before the movie started. He told her he did not feel safe doing that. “Rod, I have gay and lesbian friends. I have a bi friend,” she said. “None of them behave like that. I’ve never seen anything like it. They were egging each other on. And the sense of rage coming off those people — it was evil. And here’s the thing: this was not in Austin, this was not in Deep Ellum [hipster Dallas neighborhood], this was in the far north suburbs. “This was not at the fringes. It’s in a town that’s home to three of the biggest churches in Texas!” It was just one night at the movies, granted. And any sort of person could be a jackass at the movies. What got to N. was that this trans group — she described them as over 20 people — was so confident in itself that its members thought they had no responsibility to anybody else around them to respect civility. That, and the fact that nobody dared to confront them over their obnoxious behavior, either not wanting the hassle, or thinking that nothing would be done by the authorities running the theater, because trans folk are this week’s Chosen People. That’s all a theater chain needs: national headlines saying that it is HATEFUL to trans people. “I was thinking, ‘Well, sign me up for the Benedict Option,” she said. After our conversation, N. texted: I found it very ironic that we went to see the movie Civil War last night. What I watched go on outside that theater while we were in line and inside that theater made me realize a civil war is coming. It is undeniable at this point. I kept thinking, someday. You know how you think that? ‘Someday it’ll get bad. Someday we’ll have to take a hard stand. Someday people will be persecuted for their beliefs.’ Rod, it’s not someday anymore. It is in our face. And I can easily see where this erupts into extreme violence. I can easily see where a civil war is coming. … I don’t know which would be worse, Hillary and her liberalism, or Trump with his hatred and his wolf in sheep’s clothing politics. But it’s about to get really, really bad. What makes this a Thing, in my view, is that my friend, and every other person in that line and in the theater who was subjected to this filth, felt afraid to say a word to these disgusting loudmouths — or, it appears, to ask management to do something about it. This, for fear that the scene might get ugly — and that authorities would not do anything about it, for fear of being called bigots. And this, in Texas. The movie theater incident is a Broken Window Moment. We will have plenty more of them. UPDATE: Comments closed because of trolls. ]]>
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  • The Ideological Clash at the Heart of Black Panther | The ...
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    The Ideological Clash at the Heart of Black Panther Far more than globalist propaganda, the movie tackles tough issues of race, place, and culture.

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Armond White2
The National Review / OUT



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The Trashing of a Generation
    Captain America celebrates ideological civil war. Captain America: Civil War confirms our national dumb-down. While the mainstream media pretzel themselves over the presidential primaries, Marvel Studios has steadily accomplished a rejiggering of the American public’s cultural and political consciousness. Civil War completes this devolution in its story of superhero combat where one faction of pop icons, led by Captain America/Steve Rogers (Chris Evans), faces off against another faction, headed by billionaire genius Iron Man/Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.). As momentary adversaries, Captain America and Iron Man almost represent the schism that now divides American voters, politicians, and pundits. I say “almost,” because the film’s comic-book premise doesn’t inspire reflection upon the dire seriousness of our current ideological civil war. If anything proves the triviality of Hollywood’s comic-book franchises, it is this disregard of the class realities that truly separate Americans. Working-class poster boy Steve Rogers has no common cause with wealthy authoritarian Tony Stark; the superficial show of patriotism that binds them doesn’t erase the difference between the former’s grunt-worker sacrifice and the latter’s aristocratic expertise. It’s the ultimate sentimental cynicism when Captain America’s devotion to his dangerously conditioned childhood friend Bucky/Winter Soldier (Sebastian Stan) — who represents war’s emotional cost — is used to evoke ambivalence toward the military, while Stark’s authority celebrates the Military (and Hollywood) Industrial Complex. Is it overreaching — or being humorless — to recognize and critique a piece of entertainment that takes America’s schism lightly? Will fanboys — or for that matter film critics — ever understand that Marvel Studios has engineered a cultural coup that prevents viewers from thinking? How did we get here? (function($){ var swapArticleBodyPullAd = function() { if ($('body').hasClass('node-type-articles')) { var $pullAd = $('.story-container .pullad').addClass('mobile-position'); if (window.matchMedia("(min-width: 640px)").matches) { if ($pullAd.hasClass('mobile-position')) { $pullAd .addClass('desktop-position') .insertBefore('.article-ad-desktop-position'); } } else { if ($pullAd.hasClass('mobile-position')) { $pullAd .addClass('mobile-position') .insertBefore('.article-ad-mobile-position'); } } } }; $(window).on('resize', function(){ swapArticleBodyPullAd(); }).resize(); })(jQuery); Since comics and graphic novels became popular as counterculture, adolescents have been encouraged to reduce mainstream politics to their own sentimentality. Thus, Marvel’s various superheroes appeal to teenage rebellion: Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson), Falcon (Anthony Mackie), War Machine (Don Cheadle), Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner), Vision (Paul Bettany), Scarlet Witch (Elizabeth Olsen), and the others personify juvenile sensibility. They remain trivial, even as their divisions play out in serial chase scenes, explosions, and technological butt-kicking. Each one’s predicament represents a denial of the moral complexities that come with maturity. Fear of growing up is implicit in both the devious terrorist plots of supervillain Zemo (Daniel Brühl), who harbors childhood dreams of vengeance, and the supercilious wit of Tony Stark, the George Soros/Steve Jobs–type to whom the superfreaks all feel indebted. (As Stark, Downey achieves the same promiscuous waste of talent as hammy British actors of old. Civil War is politics as adolescents misperceive social/global crisis. Despite the supergeeks’ arguing either against working for the restrictive capitalist government or for their own sense of doing right and correcting injustice, the fact is, nothing here has gravitas. Civil War is politics as adolescents misperceive social/global crisis. This has been going on for so long (ever since Hollywood realized the bounty to be had in cajoling comic-book culture’s ready audience; since, say, the 1978 Superman film, then 1989’s Batman) that, by now, the brainwashing is complete. The trivializing has grabbed such hold that when a genuine pop artist like Zack Snyder deepens comics lore into visionary, moral art (the profound Man of Steel and Batman v Superman), many fanboys, and critics, react with anger, resentment — and ignorance. To praise Civil War as entertainment is to accept its puerile conflicts. This is the moral reduction that has happened to American youth culture in the wake of the generational dissents of the Vietnam War. Movies as violent as the Marvel flicks are not pacifist but are proof of anti-military sentiment — such as became evident in the confused Ferguson protestations about “militarized police,” a foolish, redundant term exploited by manipulative media outlets and politicians. Civil War furbishes aggression simply to excite viewers who are as programmed as poor Bucky. In a similar sense, Civil War exploits recent political trends such as Black Lives Matter. Black actress Alfre Woodard (whose portrayal of a comically psychotic wench was the only convincing characterization in 12 Years a Slave) appears as a grieving mother who blames Stark — standing in for the Military Industrial Complex — for the death of her child, a promising youth with a 3.6 grade-point average. Woodard’s “Who’s going to avenge my son?” shamelessly taps the illusion of Michael Brown, Freddie Gray, and Tamir Rice as Boy Scouts and potential Rhodes scholars. That’s way out of bounds. This pandering passes for political relevance among non-thinking viewers. So does the film’s multiracial superhero team, especially new inductee Chadwick Boseman (superb as Jackie Robinson in 42 and James Brown in Get On Up) as the offensively named Black Panther, a pseudo-African potentate who possesses suspiciously feline/feminine powers of vengeance. Black comics fans are an immediate target of Marvel Studios’ exploitation. Note the scene where Black Widow, played by the white, ultra-sexy Johansson, is confronted by Black Panther’s aide, a Nubian queen with fore and aft protrusions and powerful swagger. She threatens Black Widow: “Move or you will be moved!” Marvel Studios shows no appreciation of what “civil war” actually means. This patronization is consistent with Marvel Studios’ political infantilizing. The vigilante Avengers’ inability to avoid collateral casualties when fighting the bad guys raises the global body count. These blithe depictions of tragedies precipitate the film’s basic ideological quarrel, similar to that in the powerful Batman v Superman. Yet Civil War’s evaluation of this dilemma, of what’s at stake in American politics, is petulant and trite. Stark critiques the roguish Rogers: “Even when he’s wrong, he thinks he’s right. That makes him dangerous.” This tempts a Bernie Sanders/Elizabeth Warren–style American self-reproach, just as Sanders is the model for an early scene of Stark at MIT funding every student’s research proposal. It’s alarming — if not offensive — to see an entertainment film feed this fatuousness to juvenile moviegoers so as to shore up their political fancies. More Movies Mark Ruffalo vs. White ‘Conservative’ Women The Mummy Unwrapped: American Guilt and Masochism There’s Still Life in The Mummy No wonder Civil War’s big blow-out — half the superheroes pointlessly battling the other half in a Leipzig airport — becomes repetitious and calamitous. It’s the most pointless, decadent scene of the year so far. Directing team Anthony and Joe Russo work by-the-numbers, staging blurry, undecipherable action and rounding up extraneous Marvel characters Ant Man (Paul Rudd) and Spider Man (Tom Holland) for comic relief. It’s rebooting on top of rebooting simply because fanboys love a reboot; that’s how pathetically indoctrinated we’ve become. The Russos’ Iron Man versus Captain America competition appeals to comics fans’ sophomoric cynicism, but the head-banging among invincible beings amounts to nothing; it lacks the magnitude of Batman v Superman’s soulful contemplation of wounded people who are torn and fighting against themselves. Marvel Studios shows no appreciation of what “civil war” actually means. At least the Wachowski siblings were genuinely implicated in the race/sex struggles of The Matrix (1999), but here, the Russos’ imitation of the Wachowskis’ diversity carnival doesn’t work; it’s not heartfelt theorizing, just exploitation. Without Zack Snyder’s visual wit, Marvel’s tedious, hackneyed formula costs this film’s political allegory its metaphorical heft. And a generation of filmgoers, now accustomed to comic-book pettiness, will lack the proper moral outrage. They’re ill equipped to realize how Civil War’s quasi-politics cheer our current state of incivility as a thrill ride. When everybody’s vengeful this is the trash we get. — Armond White, a film critic who writes about movies for National Review Online, received the American Book Awards’ Anti-Censorship Award. He is the author of The Resistance: Ten Years of Pop Culture That Shook the World and the forthcoming What We Don’t Talk about When We Talk about the Movies. ]]>
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  • The Twelfth Annual Better-Than List
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    A critical review of the year’s best and worst films It’s no accident that the very best movies of 2016 challenged the mainstream and were not from Hollywood. Too many American filmmakers have lost the ability to look at human experience without cheapening our responses to it. Our most urgent issues as human beings, and our most sensitive needs as people who think and feel, are betrayed by a culture committed to childish escapism produced to shore up fatuous, fashionable tenets — which then get endorsed by media shills. The year’s Better-Than List has expanded because film culture has exploded beyond homogenous tastes and interests; multimedia competition has only exacerbated our fragmentation. But the point of the Better-Than List is always to inspire critical thinking and encourage personal response against the conformist hive-mind that aims to tame our diverse tastes. The best movies reward cultural courage, making it easier to reject the garbage. The President > Southside with You Mohsen Mahkmalbaf’s epic parable about modern-day revolution in a country resembling Iran offers unexpected insight into the effects of despotism on a ruler and his subjects. Makhmalbaf’s insistence on shared humanity — a leader’s obligation to forgive his public and vice versa — furnishes the humanist critique that American media have avoided for the past eight years. Richard Tanne, instead, dished up another fatuous Obama-origin myth for political sycophants. Being 17 > Moonlight André Téchiné’s exhilarating observation of French and Algerian teens in love anticipates New Europe’s complicated future; Barry Jenkins reduced the black gay American protagonist in his movie to an identity-politics martyr. A humane, visionary work vs. condescending, politically correct propaganda. Sunset Song > Manchester by the Sea Terence Davies’s deeply empathetic Scottish drama (from Lewis Grassic Gibbon’s novel) finds national and ethnic awareness in a woman’s life struggle, while Kenneth Lonergan’s male weepie forgoes empathy for melodramatic clichés that never rise above self-pity. (function($){ var swapArticleBodyPullAd = function() { if ($('body').hasClass('node-type-articles')) { var $pullAd = $('.story-container .pullad').addClass('mobile-position'); if (window.matchMedia("(min-width: 640px)").matches) { if ($pullAd.hasClass('mobile-position')) { $pullAd .addClass('desktop-position') .insertBefore('.article-ad-desktop-position'); } } else { if ($pullAd.hasClass('mobile-position')) { $pullAd .addClass('mobile-position') .insertBefore('.article-ad-mobile-position'); } } } }; $(window).on('resize', function(){ swapArticleBodyPullAd(); }).resize(); })(jQuery); Wiener-Dog > The Lobster Todd Solondz’s symbolic dachshund traverses three tales of human will, observing fragmentation nationwide with breathtaking boldness and humor; Yorgos Lanthimos’s self-congratulatory Kubrick-derivative nihilism mocks civilization. Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk > La La Land Ang Lee’s moving 3-D vision of post-9/11 stress shows Americans loving one another as citizens and as soul mates — unlike Damien Chazelle’s childish ode to showbiz vanity. Lee transcends genre to remind Americans of what connects them; Chazelle distorts genre into idiotic escapism then deadens it. Beautiful Something > Moonlight Joseph Graham’s intimate, multi-character cityscape follows the spiritual journey of several Philadelphia gay men, while Moonlight (yes, that con job again) exploits “minority” status to sentimentalize victimization. The personal vs. the pseudo-political. Batman v Superman > Deadpool Zack Snyder continues to find depth in pop myths, making comic-book archetypes reveal our souls. But Tim Miller’s Edgar Wright–lite comic-book sarcasm defies and denies serious fun. Hacksaw Ridge, Knight of Cups, Voyage of Time > Silence Mel Gibson professes faith the difficult way, by defending a conscientious objector’s war experience. Terrence Malick searches for faith in Hollywood (fiction) and throughout history (nonfiction). But Martin Scorsese’s latest protracted remake replaces their conviction and originality with a lapse of cinematic faith. Eisenstein in Guanajuato > Cameraperson Peter Greenaway’s outrageous bio-pic about Sergei Eisenstein, whose impact on cinema is still felt, pairs compassion for the Russian exile’s private life with respect for his art. Kirsten Johnson confuses her ré​sumé as a photographer on PC docs with artistic expression. Genius vs. narcissism. Miles Ahead > The Birth of a Nation Don Cheadle finds inspiration and invention in Miles Davis’s genius, while Nate Parker misunderstands Nat Turner’s insurrection as instruction. History is to teach not repeat. Valley of Love, Don’t Call Me Son > Toni Erdmann France’s Guillaume Nicloux and Brazil’s Anna Muylaert both treat family dysfunction as serious business in two innovative films about the difficulty of parenting gay children, while Germany’s Maren Ade sees parental foibles and inherited perversity as a berserk sitcom. Nicloux and Muylaert go deep; Ade goes too far. Will You Dance with Me? > The 13thDerek Jarman’s previously unreleased record of one night at a London disco in the 1980s survives as a document of assorted human desires unified by popular culture. Ava DuVernay uses the documentary form to showcase today’s race-hustling elites who promote social division through black victimization. Jarman’s joyous, personal interpretation of dance culture makes history; DuVernay’s dubious misinterpretation of the Constitution’s 13th Amendment violates it. Sully > Rogue One Clint Eastwood celebrates true American heroism while reevaluating the cynical disbelief that has infected post-9/11 culture; Garth Edwards depicts the miasma of war as a dull Star Wars episode. An edifying entertainment for adults vs. ends-justifies-the-means propaganda for children of all ages. The Mermaid > The BFG Stephen Chow’s action-fantasy just happens to make ecological points while defending the ethics of the forgotten working class. Spielberg’s political parable is a transparent valedictory salute to Obama’s ruling-class elitism, normalized as childhood fantasy. The most popular film in China’s history vs. an American election-year flop. Kubo and the Two Strings > Finding Dory, Sausage Party Travis Knight responds to the crisis of our rotted pop culture with this fable about the sustenance a boy receives from family memory and hand-fashioned art. It’s far superior to another fishy piece of Pixar sentimentality and Seth Rogen’s millennial update of Animal House raunchiness. Standing Tall > Fences Emmanuelle Bercot’s story of a lost urban white kid in Paris gives an updated view of how society fails then rescues its own. It bests the theatrical and political clichés of August Wilson’s black Pittsburgh family drama. Contemporary humanism vs. cornball politics. Patriots Day, The Finest Hours > Manchester by the Sea Peter Berg’s and Craig Gillespie’s true-life New England adventures feature ethnic sensitivity that redefines American character and the action-history genre. But Manchester by the Sea (yes, that con job again) peddles ethnic smugness. Two classic B-movies vs. indie pseudo-art. Hidden Figures > Elle Theodore Melfi’s pre-feminist heroic trio outperform Paul Verhoeven’s Euro-trash post-feminist heroine. In the former, the personal humanizes politics, while the personal is shallowly politicized in the latter. Love & Friendship > 20th Century Women Whit Stillman satirizes modern morality in Jane Austen drag, while Mike Mills drags viewers through a Sundance reeducation course in “feminism.”  More Movies Mark Ruffalo vs. White ‘Conservative’ Women The Mummy Unwrapped: American Guilt and Masochism There’s Still Life in The Mummy Rules Don’t Apply > La La Land Warren Beatty’s misconceived whatzit briefly confesses the sex-and-business wonderland of his early days in L.A. It’s far more credible and fascinating than Chazelle’s clumsy, priggish, neo-yuppie “musical” (yes, that con job again). Aferim! > Captain America: Civil War Radu Jude’s profane Romanian folktale is also an epic satire (in majestic black-and-white) of how a debased culture rationalizes terrorism, pain, and inhumanity. Marvel attempts the same with its superhero franchise, trivializing the concept of “civil war” the same way Bernie Sanders trivializes the concept of “revolution.” — Armond White is the author of New Position: The Prince Chronicles. ]]>
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Billy Roper1
The Roper Report



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

⚠️ EDGY 🔥 CONTENT 🔥 WARNING 🔥 (NSFW?) ⚠️

🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻


  • Is America Headed For A Civil War?
    In a big year for superhero movies, none grossed higher than Captain America: Civil War, the Joe & Anthony Russo-directed film that not only managed to tell a coherent, crowd-pleasing story that crammed in a dozen Marvel superheroes but also became the first Captain America film to cross the billion-dollar worldwide gross mark. [4] What the hell is next after Captain America: Civil War? Well, I guess I know what’s next. the Phase 3 of Marvel Cinematic Universe, which will go through deep
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Society Reviews3
Society Reviews



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Ant-Man and the Wasp Review
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    If you are still reeling from the ending of Avengers: Infinity War (which has been somewhat tainted considering all the news of future films starring everyone who supposedly died) then you are probably in need of a fun cheesy superhero film and Ant-Man 2 comes just in time.

    Read more →

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  • The Fate of the Furious Review
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    The Fate of the Furious is a step back from the last few films, mostly due to the fact that there is a more interesting story going on behind the camera than in front of it.

    Read more →

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  • Avengers: Endgame Review & Discussion: Folks…It’s Over
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    All in all, Avengers: Endgame is a pretty good film and a solid ending for the Marvel Cinematic Universe...as long as you don't watch another MCU film after this.
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Sonny Bunch2
Free Beacon



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • ‘Black Panther’ Review
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    BY:

    Black Panther is unmistakably a Marvel Cinematic Universe origin film: competently executed with the house anti-style largely intact; solidly acted with a few well-choreographed action sequences that culminate in an un-rousing and sometimes-shoddy-looking CGI mishmash; and seasoned with a healthy dose of humor and inter-universe connections designed to appeal to those of us who have waded through the previous 17 entries in the indefatigable mega-franchise.

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  • ‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ Review
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    BY:

    I’m not entirely sure I could recall for you the plot of the first Ant-Man film. There was something about a thief played by Paul Rudd stealing a suit that makes him small from a scientist played by Michael Douglas who had a daughter played by Evangeline Lilly and also the aforementioned characters wanted to stop Michael Douglas’s work from falling into the hands of the congressman from House of Cards, who was evil because capitalism.

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Kyle Smith2
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Why the World Loves the Avengers
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Because they embody the America that other nations admire.
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  • Will Arnett is back in black in hilarious 'Lego Batman Movie'
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    movie reviewsthe lego movie It’s lonely being the best, and don’t I know it. Lego Batman knows it, too, and he’s adrift inside his vast hilltop estate. When no one is watching, he eats microwave dinners for one and sits by himself watching “Jerry Maguire” on his big-screen TV. In other words: Everything is awesome. Yet the moral of “The Lego Batman Movie” is that even a dark knight needs a family, and then some. “It takes a village, not a Batman,” new Police Commissioner Barbara Gordon (Rosario Dawson) tells Batman (Will Arnett). Ugh, let’s forget about that vanquished supervillain Hillary Clinton. The spinoff of the blocks-buster “The Lego Movie” (whose sequel will be sold separately, in 2019) joins “Batman v. Superman” and “Captain America: Civil War” in the new blame-a-superhero subgenre, the one that pleads for bureaucracies and committees over bone-crunching and butt-kicking. Pretty soon there will be a blockbuster called “Procedural Man” who will be using his laser vision to proofread legal injunctions for the ACLU. Nevertheless, nutty as “The Lego Batman Movie” is in conception, it’s nifty in execution. It picks up at my favorite part of “The Lego Movie” — Will Arnett’s stream-of-consciousness chatter over the closing credits — and runs with it, adding “Austin Powers”-style mockery of the conventions of action movies and a load of arch references to previous Batman movies. (Welcome back, Bat shark repellent.) Opening up the Bat-parameters of the franchise for comic purposes provides some dizzy ideas: Who knew Batman could sing? The movie slams the comedy pedal to the floor, racing through so many visual and verbal gags that it begs to be watched more than once. Grumbling about how he’d rather work alone, Batman instead accidentally adopts an orphan named Dick Grayson, who calls himself Robin (Michael Cera), and is creeped out when the Joker (Zach Galifianakis) insists that he and Batman need each other. Along the way we learn about why Robin wears those green panties, what Superman’s doorbell sounds like and what Batman wears when he watches movies around the house (he keeps the mask on but changes into a bathrobe). Eschewing the earlier film’s contempt for middle-class America and its lame meta-ending, “The Lego Batman Movie” has a different creative team — its director is Chris McKay, a veteran of TV’s “Robot Chicken” — and a different vibe: more childlike goofiness, less sophomore snark. Here’s hoping that in his next movie, Lego Batman rids us of the greatest scourge ever to face Gotham City: Batfleck. Share this:FacebookTwitterGoogleFacebook MessengerWhatsAppEmailCopy ]]>
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National Review Staff1
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Avengers: Endgame: Marvel’s Monumental Achievement
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    In Endgame, the plan came together, and it was truly fun to watch.
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Vox Day2
Castalia House



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

⚠️ 𝐄𝐃𝐆𝐘 🔥 𝐂𝐎𝐍𝐓𝐄𝐍𝐓 🔥 𝐖𝐀𝐑𝐍𝐈𝐍𝐆 🔥 (𝐍𝐒𝐅𝐖?) ⚠️

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  • Black is the new black
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Black Panther is not only the best superhero movie ever made, it is also the most successful. More or less. This just goes to show that Obama really did heal the racial divide in the United States and end global racism.
    By the time the four-day President’s Day holiday stretch ends, Black Panther will have surpassed many of Marvel’s mightiest on the all-time domestic B.O. openers chart. Black Panther is now looking at the 6th best opening of all-time on a 3-day-basis with an estimated $187.6M per industry projections and a mind-blowing $216M over four days.

    How much do moviegoers love Black Panther? The Ryan Coogler-directed movie earned an A+ CinemaScore tonight, Marvel’s second after 2012’s The Avengers.

    On the 3-day all-time chart, Black Panther is just above Captain America: Civil War ($179.1M). Back in January Fandango reported that out of the gate in its first 24 hours, Black Panther outstripped the advance tickets sales of Civil War, however, analysts didn’t rush to comp the Wakanda superhero to Marvel’s other titles. They just couldn’t believe at the time how massive this was going to be. While Black Panther is under Avengers: Age of Ultron on the 3-day all-time openers list  ($191.2M), the pic is beating the sequel’s four-day run ($204.4M). Black Panther has already left Disney’s Beauty and the Beast ($174.7M) and WB/DC’s Batman v. Superman ($166M) in the dust to become the biggest pre-summer opener of all-time.
    This is excellent news. Given the similarly unprecedented success of Wonder Woman, Marvel is clearly going to be doubling down, and doubling down again, on even more diversity.

    The door to the disruption of the comics industry just opened that much wider.

    It's going to be amusing to read the revisionist reviews when all the critics finally sober up. I expect we will see an arc similar to the one we see after every Star Wars movie.
    1. OMG! It's the BEST since EMPIRE!
    2. Okay, maybe we got a little carried away. But it's still really good!
    3. Well, I mean, it's all right.
    4. Actually, there are a lot of things that don't make any sense.
    5. And are pretty lame, come to think of it.
    6. This movie sucks.
    7. Now, what was the second one called? No, the second of the new ones, not the prequels.
    You know it's going to happen. The whispers about the first major plot holes have already begun. And speaking of Star Wars movies, as of Day 62, The Last Jedi had officially fallen $300 million behind its predecessor in domestic box office.

    TFA: Day 63 $917.8
    TLJ: Day 63 $617.4

    Both my December 19th prediction and my January 12th projection of $624 million domestic are looking pretty good. Including the foreign box office, TLJ is currently $745.8 million short. Convergence is expensive.

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  • See, Marvel was RIGHT
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Chasing the elusive minority dollar is the secret to massive success. This just proves it!
    Appetite for presale tickets leaves little doubt — Marvel Studios’s next big blockbuster is “Black Panther.”

    The film, which will be released by Walt Disney Co. DIS, +1.09%  on Feb. 16, was already one of the most-anticipated movies of the year. It just broke the record for highest ticket presales in the first 24 hours for a Marvel film, according to online movie ticket retailer Fandango.

    The previous record-holder was “Captain America: Civil War,” which coincidently is the film in which Chadwick Boseman’s portrayal of the Black Panther first made an appearance on the big screen.

    Fandango, which is owned by Comcast Corp.’s NBCUniversal, didn’t reveal actual numbers for “Black Panther” or “Civil War” presales in making its claim.

    What is known is “Civil War” pulled in $75.5 million in its first day in theaters, according to data from Box Office Mojo. The film went on to garner $179.1 million in its opening weekend—the third largest opening in 2016—and $1.2 billion in total worldwide gross.
    And if Black Panther doesn't beat Civil War at the box office, that will just prove that America is too racist to appreciate a proven blockbuster.

    They really are getting desperate, aren't they. Speaking of desperate, my December 19th prediction is still in play, as barring a big weekend, The Last Jedi will fall short of $624 million domestic.

    2018/01/08 $1,791,497 $423/screen   $574,483,043 Day 25
    2018/01/09 $2,368,317 $560/screen   $576,851,360 Day 26
    2018/01/10 $1,744,275 $412/screen   $578,595,635 Day 27
    2018/01/11 $1,678,949 $397/screen   $580,274,584 Day 28

    To put it in perspective, on Day 28 of The Force Awakens, it brought in $757 per screen to reach $825,932,841 of its $936,662,225 total.

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Hugh Hewitt3
Salem Radio Network



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Faith Like A Superhero
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    My Friday devotional opened with a reference to the 1950’s TV show, The Adventures of Superman.  Mark Roberts looked at Superman’s “never-ending battle for truth, justice, and the American way,” and using Psalm 45:4 looks at a Christian’s search for truth, justice and humility.  I love the nostalgia, for it is purely nostalgic.  As an avid follower of superhero comics, neither the progenitor nor any of his countless offshoots aspire any longer to such lofty goals.  No longer does an individual finding themselves more powerful, and therefore different, than the rest of humanity seek to use that power for good (or evil for that matter).  Now such power is simply to be coped with – a burden that separates you from your peers.  Good and evil are abstract concepts, labels, applied to the actions of the powered individual as they seek their place in the world while so oddly encumbered. Captain America: Civil War is prime exemplar #1 of this trend on the movie side of things, but I must resist my comic geek urge to trace this change through the genre and instead focus back on the devotional, which is a call to good.  One must ask, I think, that if Superman’s battle is purely nostalgic, is the church’s search for truth, justice and humility not similarly a thing mostly of fond memory.  Generalizing about something as large and diverse as Christian expression in America is fraught with opportunity to be wrong, but I do think it would be fair to say that in large and very visible parts of the American church a case can be made for the nostalgic comparison. In our efforts to be relevant and attractive is it not fair to say that many a church has changed from trying to help its congregants find and exhibit truth, justice and humility to finding self-fulfillment?  If you read deeply about Mother Theresa, you find that her ministry was almost pure sacrifice – not the least bit self-fulfilling.  Christ Himself confessed to God that He wished He did not have to die on the cross.  Truth, justice and humility can be, and often are, the polar opposite of self-fulfillment.  Yes, we have to meet people where they are, but we should be taking them somewhere too. Roberts comparison of the Superman of old with the Psalmist is more apt than perhaps he intended, for as the superhero has changed, so it seems has the church.  But Roberts is not calling for that change, he is calling for a return to the old model: When we pray for our leaders, as Scripture urges us to do (1 Tim. 2:2), we should ask the Lord to lead them in the ways of truth, humility, and justice. God knows we desperately need leaders today who exemplify these qualities! Yet Psalm 45:4 also provides a model for our behavior in the world. We too are to be people of truth, humility, and justice. Culturally we seem to have crossed some sort of threshold.  Christianity no longer defines our culture.  We find ourselves in a position more akin to the first 400 years of the church’s existence than we do the last 1600 years.  Superheroes are the stuff of fiction and they exist purely to sell more media, so they are going where the sales are.  But Christianity is something entirely different – we hold truth.  It is not “sales” that defines our direction, it is that truth that we hold. That church of the first 400 years found its way to the dominance it has enjoyed for the last 1600 not by following the culture, but by exhibiting a different one that simply worked better.  What made it special and different was not an encumbrance to be coped with, but a gift to be celebrated and enjoyed – in the pursuit of good. As Christians, we are different, we do not fit in.  That’s not a problem, that is a blessing.  And not just for us, but for the world.  All we have to do is believe and act like it. ]]>
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  • Discovering The Real Bad Guys
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Is it just me, or do you miss a good bad guy in movies these days?  I first noticed in last year’s James Bond blockbuster “Spectre.”  Suddenly all those times 007 saved the world were reduced to a beef between James and his adoptive brother.  There was no world threatening bad guy, just a jealous son.  Oh sure, he was threatening the world, but not for conquest, just to get at his brother. (minor spoiler alert)  This past weekend’s megahit “Captain America Civil War” suffers from the same issue.  Worse than the Bond film, the world-wide threat in this most recent movie ended up being no threat at all, it was just a feint to get Cap and Iron Man at each others throats.   Oh yeah, and the bad guys motivations? – His family was killed as collateral damage in an Avengers action. If these films, and a lot of others, are any indication apparently the biggest threats that face mankind are now all deeply personnel.  Something has significantly changed in the four years since the original Avengers movie came out.  The heart of that original movie was Tony Stark overcoming his rampant narcissism to make a truly and profoundly self-sacrificial act, thus preventing genuine world wide catastrophe.  In the current Cap movie everyone is a narcissist.  The movie is a battle of egos, not a battle of good vs evil.  And the worst thing, absolutely the worst thing, is that absent a “good” bad guy, there are no heroes.  Rather than presenting me with a hero of character to aspire too, this movie reduces my “heroes.”  They are not the least bit heroic, but rather mired in the same muck I am struggling so hard to overcome in my own life. This must mean that the people that put these movies together, investing hundreds of millions of dollars, see this as what the movie going public wants.  If these movies are any judge, no longer do we want to be inspired or called to be better, rather we want to know that those that are apparently so superior are the same schmucks we are.  It is easy to blame narcissism as the source of this phenomena, but I also wonder if it has something to do with the fact that we no longer perceive genuine evil? In the end, I suppose one could argue that these movies reveal a deep truth, that evil is not a them vs us thing, but rather we are the source of evil.  But these movies fail to make that point, they seek to have us sympathize on some level with everybody.  I don’t disagree that many that perpetuate genuine evil in the world do so from understandable motivations, probably even some deep pain.  But such is not really the point, at some juncture they made a decision that their pain and their motivation justified their evil acts, and when they did so they sacrificed their claim to sympathy. If only the films protagonists sought to fight their own impulses as valiantly and defiantly as they chose to battle aliens and monsters.  There is nothing wrong with having our heroes have personal demons just like the rest of us, that makes them relatable.  But if we want them to be heroes in the true sense of the word, they need to overcome those demons.  In “Spectre” Bond gets his brother and then walks away as if all conflict ever is resolved, he never battles with himself at all.  In “Civil War” nothing is resolved really.  In the much-maligned “Dawn of Justice” the Batman/Superman conflict is simply over-ridden by a much larger conflict that requires their unity.  None of these are satisfying for none of them offer genuine hope. The real superhero teaches us that our hope lies not in a hero, but in ourselves.  I am lucky – somewhere along the line I figured out that, that there is no super-soldier serum, no armor and I could never train hard enough to be Batman.  (I think I studied chemistry in hopes of replicating the accident that produced The Flash, but I was wrong. ) But I did find a super-power.  Christianity gives me access to the supernatural.  God is by definition supernatural.  A proper relationship with God, through Christ, gives me access to that super-natural power.  No, I can’t fly, no cool tech, not muscular enough to restrain a helicopter, but with what God has given me, I am powerful enough to struggle with my own inner demons.  The battle is not over, but the end is in sight – there is hope. Given the state of our pop-culture movies these days, the nation seems to have lost that hope.  That’s too bad because that hope is still there if we just look in the right place. ]]>
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  • Mark Steyn on the idiocy of Quentin Tarentino denying the connection of film violence to school shootings
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    HH: I begin with Columnist To the World, Mark Steyn, from www.steynonline.com. And Mark, probably the most important news of the day is that the Gunnison Sage Groush is probably going to be listed as endangered in Colorado, this shocking people across the Rocky Mountain State. MS: Yes, it’s actually less exclusive getting onto the Endangered Species list than it ought to be. It’s not like, you know putting down your kid for Eton at birth. HH: There are only 4,000 Gunnison Sage Grouses, which is a smaller cousin of the greater sage grouse. But they’re setting aside 1.7 million acres of critical habitat, just a slight bit of overkill, Mark Steyn, I think. MS: I know, at some point, this has got to stop. I mean, I’m in favor, right now, of them setting aside 1.7 million acres for the last few. And it may be as low as 4,000. It may actually be lower than whatever particular grouse this is. Setting aside 1.7 million acres for the fewer than 4,000 Americans who’d still like a small republic of limited government and representatives, they ought to be on the Endangered Species list. HH: They should. I had Duane print off the rule. It’s 230 pages. It is truly a remarkable excess, and it just stands opposite all of the real problems. They’ve got time to put out a 200 page rule on the Gunnison Sage Grouse, Mark Steyn. But there’s no one talking about the debt ceiling or entitlement reform. I can’t find a Republican leader. They’re all gone. MS: No, and that’s also something that should be on the Endangered Species list, too. And I’d be surprised if they ever did put the Republican leadership on the Endangered Species list, that the regulation would run to 230 pages, because I don’t think there’s that much to be said about them. I think this is, at some point, you know, one of the tragedies about America being quite so broke as it is, is that when you’re trillions and trillions of dollars in the hole, it’s easy to tell yourself that nothing matters anymore, that oh well, you know, the only thing that matters is reforming Medicare, and blowing another 1.7 million acres and 230 pages of regulation on this unfortunate, little tufted fellow. That doesn’t really matter. It all matters. And as long as we’re…and actually, it sends an important signal, the ability to stop the spending even in small amounts. I mean for example, I accept that if you’ve got a head of state, you’ve got to feed and clothe and house the head of state. But for example, the President’s Hawaiian vacation now costs more than the cost of flying the entire Royal family around the world in the last year, I think in 2011 is the last year we had the figures for. In other words, flying not just the Queen, but the dukes and duchesses not just around the United Kingdom, but to her other realms in Canada and Australia and Jamaica and Belize and Papua New Guinea, costs less than flying the president of the United States on one vacation. He should set an example. He’s right in what he said to Boehner. He doesn’t care about the spending, because if he would, he’d take a vacation at Camp David, or he’d take a vacation in gun-crazed Chicago, his supposed home. HH: No, you’re absolutely right. The scale has become so immense, nobody really focuses on the details. Out in Southern California, Mark, where the Great Park exists in Orange County, where El Toro Marine Corps Air Station used to be, it was revealed yesterday that of the $200 million dollars spent in the last year on developing the park, less than $40 million of that could be traced to in the ground improvements. The rest went to PR and paper shuffling. So $38 million of $200 million got into the ground improvements. That’s government at every level. MS: Well, that’s big government. And people shouldn’t be surprised at this, because when government reaches a certain size, then it’s all just about the paperwork shuffling. I mean, for example, Obamacare will be basically about, I mean, in many respects, that’s already happening, that medical treatment, in essence, the costs of the paperwork shuffling are growing more and more and more burdensome. There’s a company out there, I’m always fascinated when you switch on cable TV, there’s a private company out there that just specializes in making it easier for you to fill in W-8’s and 1099’s. I’m ashamed I even know those numbers, by the way. Nobody should know the numbers of government forms off the top of their head like that. But there’s a private company that makes a very nice living just processing, just two, two of those government…they don’t do W-9’s, for example. That would be a whole other company you’d have to set up to get going on that, just W-8’s and 1099’s. HH: It’s becoming so vast, it’s almost impossible to consider what means the Gunnison Sage Grouse and gun violence and Joe Biden. But let me ask you about Joe Biden and gun violence. The sage grouse are safe, Mark, because they’re now on the Endangered Species list. But evidently, the rest of America is not. And the Vice President is not going to sleep until he turns over his recommendations. At the end of this mini-drama, what exactly is going to be different in America than today, do you think? MS: Well, I would imagine if, for example, Dianne Feinstein’s bill is anything to go by, that somebody will come up with something that looks like restrictions, but with a lot of, with so many opt outs on it that in the end, it doesn’t particularly make that much difference. But just to go back to what you were saying at the top of the show, there’s been a school shooting, and the Oscars are out. And I don’t, I’m like most people. I’m just shooting off the top of my head here about half this stuff. But the purposeless killer, in other words, one thing that these events have in common, there’s an element of theatricality to them, literally, in the case of the Batman shooter at Aurora, Colorado, but also in the case of Virginia Tech and other recent ones. And yet, they’re purposeless. They’re not even like these jihadists who, you know, go and self-detonate in order to usher in the great global caliphate. These guys have no cause. And in that, they share something in common, I think, that most Hollywood movies…one of the reason most Hollywood action movies bore me is because they’re not about anything. They’re just about some guy who’s trying to kill a bunch of people, but because Hollywood is craven and politically correct, they’re never about anything real. The guy in the movie is never trying to kill people because he wants a global caliphate. He’s just, I saw some, the Bruce Willis movie, Looper, where at one point, old Bruce Willis meets young Bruce Willis, and young Bruce Willis says, asks him something about the plot, and Bruce Willis says oh, don’t think about it. Don’t overcomplicate things. Let’s get out in the street and start shooting people again. And I think that kind of, I think that sort of purposeless, that violence without a context, so it’s not like the Second World War, it’s not like the Somme in 1916, but just violence without a context is Hollywood’s bread and butter now. And it’s no surprise that losers sort of reenact the theatricality of that, that that particular narrative, I think, is peculiar to Hollywood, and says nothing, regardless of what it says about school shootings, says nothing good about American stories. HH: Quentin Tarentino is very defensive about Django Unchained. It is the most violent movie I have seen since Straw Dogs. It is relentlessly violent and gun-filled. And he’s very touchy in the aftermath of Newtown to people saying that which happens on the screen has any impact on the losers in the world. What do you think of that argument, Mark Steyn? MS: Well look, Tarentino is an idiot. I said, I didn’t think Reservoir Dogs was a great movie. I think in a sense, he’s the Mantovani of violence, that he kind of makes it into easy listening Muzak. And if you look at what he’s done with the Civil War, this latest film, he’s not in the least bit interested in the Civil War, because that would require reading a book. It would require doing something other than watching other movies. So he’s used the Civil War as a pretext for his kind of homage to spaghetti westerns. And that’s kind of cute in a sort of postmodern joke kind of way. But of course in doing that, you utterly trivialize the actual lived experience of 19th Century America. He’s utterly trivialized that in order to make a film about how he feels about other films. And that kind of ironic pose actually is not disconnected to the kind of twerps you see deciding they’d like to go out in a blaze of glory shooting up a schoolhouse. That is a film about nothing. And when you have violent films about nothing, and then suddenly you start having violent school shootings about nothing, where people are prepared to kill people not for any cause or anything, but as an act of theater, then I think that is worth pondering, and he should be defensive about it. HH: Mark Steyn from www.steynonline.com, thank you, Mark. www.steynonline.com, America. End of interview. ]]>
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    (Review Source)

Return of Kings Staff3
Return of Kings



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

⚠️ EDGY 🔥 CONTENT 🔥 WARNING 🔥 (NSFW?) ⚠️

🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻


  • Hollywood Male Actors Deserve To Be Paid More Than Female Actresses
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Maximus King is a happily married serial monogamist who believes that feminism, affirmative action, and social censorship are hurting America. He has no social media or Website or anything to sell. If you want to reach him, he might get back to you from [email protected]
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Action Films Are As Cucked As Hollywood Itself
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Obadiah Austin is a Texan in exile. He used to write about MMA, pro-wrestling and movies. He then actually tried MMA and making movies (and had more success in the former).
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    (Review Source)

The Unz Review Staff1
Unz Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Open Thread, 5/8/2016
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Went to see Captain America: Civil War yesterday at the Alamo Drafthouse. I don’t watch many movies, and I’m not into comic books, but the Marvel films series is one I watch partly for cultural literacy (years ago I got tired of references to The Dark Knight, so I watched them just to get caught up). Also, Alamo Drafthouse really knows how to make a profit on films and distinguish themselves from Netflix in terms of what they offer. Tentpole films are still something you want to go to the movie theater for, but most of the time someone like me is not profitable for the establishment, because I avoid purchasing $4.00 size giant coke’s at the concessions. As far as the movie, it is hard from where I stand to side with anyone except Captain America, even though if you think about it there are many merits to the position of Tony Stark. I’d probably have been more persuaded by Stark’s consequentialism if it had been motivated by cold calculations, as opposed to an emotionally fraught interaction with someone negatively impacted by the Avengers. One of the things that kind of annoys me about the Avenger’s films is how much hand to hand combat there is, and lack of acknowledgement at how fragile the human body can be. Recently I got into a bike crash. I’m fine, but I had a lot of bruising which is just healing. I can understand that Captain America can take the hits, but without the suit Tony Stark is a man just like us, while Black Widow at 5’3 putting the smackdown on so many people is kind of ridiculous. But then again, it’s just a movie, and one which had Ant-Man in it, so I’m not taking it too seriously. Struck by the importance of ancient Near East in The Shape of Ancient Thought. The Axial Age in the middle of the first millennium B.C. resulted in an efflorescence of ideas which persist down to the modern age. The distribution of these of ideas were geographically distributed across the length of the Old World oikoumene, from Greece to China. The Shape of Ancient Thought is focused on two particular loci, Greece and India. But there is a repeated reference to the primacy of motifs and patterns which seem to have their ultimate roots in Egypt and Mesopotamia. The underlying idea here seems to be that Indian and Greece civilization did not emerge de novo, but rather hoisted itself up on the shoulders of the Bronze Age (the fact that both Indian and Greek writing styles derive from Aramaic roots illustrate this). I tried to read some more of A New History of Western Philosophy. The author of this book, just like the author of The Shape of Ancient Thought, is on the prolix side. But A New History of Western Philosophy has more boring content in my opinion. What Makes Texas Texas. Speaking of Texas, Uber and Lyft Are Leaving Austin After Losing Background Check Vote. Uber and Lyft are trying to muscle out and marginal city government, but is regulating ride-sharing really going to be the issue on which defenders of government prerogative are going to stand? Was this the “progressive” thing to do? Apparently some people were frightened by the lack of background checks on Uber and Lyft drivers, and the possibility of sexual assault. Perhaps anyone who uses a public restroom should also get fingerprinted. There’s the principle that corporations shouldn’t dictate to the polity, but in the case of taxi services and local governments, there’s been decades of cozy collusion. If you leave a comment which tries to hijack a thread into on of your pet issues, I won’t publish it. I have long had contempt for the television show Game of Thrones. My contempt was couched in the language of sophistication. Television shows are not as rich in texture and narrative depth as books. In hindsight this seems to have been mostly snobbery. I don’t watch the show as I don’t have HBO, and and I’m not invested in the serial in any deep way, but I am now paying attention to what’s going on since HBO has gone further than George R. R. Martin. And to be honest I am in the camp which believes there is a modest probability that HBO is the only way many of us will get satisfaction in relation to finale of the series. Also, it is interesting to see clips of flashbacks, as such a young Ned Stark confronts Ser Arthur Dayne. And of course it confirms and foreshadows the final working out of R + L = J. I remember back before the show having discussions on message boards around ~2000, and it as pretty clear to everyone that R + L = J is the most parsimonious model. Not necessarily the right one, but it was always the one you were going to have to bet on. If Martin and the HBO show go in separate directions it would almost be cool. It isn’t as if fantasy and science fiction series haven’t done a bait-and-switch before; Brandon Sanderson did so in Mistborn and that’s how the Dune series ended (the books co-written by Kevin Anderson and Brian Herbert). This complied version of ADMIXTOOLS runs straight-out-of-the-box on Ubuntu. It would be nice if those you would speculate on genetics constantly in the comments actually bother to know something about genetics. That way it would be easier to understand what you’re trying to say, instead of having to always decrypt your inchoate ramblings. For the purposes of this blog John Gillespie’s Population Genetics would probably suffice. If you are a little more ambitious there are used copies of Nielsen and Slatkin’s An Introduction to Population Genetics to be had for $40. That’s a lot better than $90 used copies of Principles of Population Genetics, and, it is focused on population genomics. Margot Honecker, unrepentant widow of East Germany’s last leader, dies at 89. She seems to have been quite unpleasant. But her fixation on shaping and determining the thought of the youth is very familiar. I went to a coffee shop today to work for a while which was basically like being in Portland. Speaking of the Pacific Northwest, ASHG 2016 is in Vancouver. I plan on going. I had no idea what the lead singer of Radiohead looked like. He looks like a character out of British Movie. ]]>
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PJ Media Staff2
PJ Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Film Review: U2 in Three Dimensions
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    PJ Media I can't believe the news today: U2 has reinvented the concert film with the dazzling U2 3D, which sets an awesome new standard for rock flicks with an all-engulfing sensory bonanza.The new 21st-century 3D technology, which requires you to wear bulky clear goggles handed out at the theater, has helped pump up otherwise routine blockbusters like "Beowulf," but it turns out to be ideally suited in recreating the feeling of the blowout stadium concert.Filmed in 2006 at a stadium in Argentina in front of 100,000 worshippers, this concert features 14 (far from all) of U2's biggest hits, blasted forth with all of the band's exhilarating stagecraft: giant video displays featuring both band action and arty figures such as a lonely cartoon office drone marching wearily in place to "Sometimes You Can't Make It On Your Own," Bono and the others venturing deep into the audience on walkways, bold (yet vague) politics. Nobody ever comes back from a U2 concert saying, "Actually, I disagreed with their stance on peace and unity."Bono dances like an Irishman, which is to say that he can't dance. Unlike Mick Jagger, his body movements are blocky and earthbound. But like Jagger, his only rival for the title of rock's greatest showman, Bono has an absolute feel for extravaganza, kicking the air during the opening tune, "Vertigo" and later donning a white Samurai bandana with the Muslim crescent, the Star of David and the Christian cross arranged to help spell out a mysterious word that will appear on the massive video screens: "COEXISTA," with the crescent serving as the C, the Star of David as the X and the cross as the T. Marvelous. Drummer Larry Mullen Jr. wears a red star, as if to signify he's a Communist thrown into a Nazi concentration camp. What does it mean? Who cares?The cameras zoom and roam and fly, among the band members and into the crowd where pretty girls sit perched on unseen shoulders waving their arms in the night air. At times several images are stacked atop of each other-there's the screen seen in the stadium, the frontman, the atmospheric red fog coming out of the wings and the delighted crowd, all of them overloading the senses and creating the kind of beautiful hallucination that leaves you buzzing and ringing after the best concerts.In the early days, during the Reagan years, U2 seemed like an angry leftist band of Irish revolutionaries, its very name (a reference to the U.S. spy plane) seemingly a mockery of the West in the Cold War. But who can argue with sentiments like "It's a beautiful day"?In 1987, "Bullet the Blue Sky" played as an anti-Reagan harangue. In this film it's an antiwar statement that samples the Civil War/WW I (and "Dr. Strangelove") song "When Johnny Comes Marching Home" and concludes not with blame but with a wish for the troops that replaces the "children who run into the arms of America" coda: "Johnny safe home," says Bono. That's not Kubrickian irony, that's seething youth mellowing into middle age.Similarly "One," seemingly an intimate song about exhausted love, has now expanded into a stadium-pleaser about world peace and working together. "The difficulties of our past will not prevent us making a better future," Bono said in introducing the song, putting an almost startlingly optimistic spin on the song. But stadium concerts are about partying, not gloom, and "U2 3D" is a smashing party given by the world's biggest band for the price of a movie ticket. Its only drawback is that, at less than 90 minutes, it's far too short.Rated G/85 minutesKyle Smith is a film critic for the the New York Post. His website is at www.kylesmithonline.com. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/blog/u2_3d/ ]]>
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    (Review Source)
  • The 3 Most Poisonous Movie Clichés of the 60s and 70s
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle Ed Driscoll and I had fun last week with my brainwave about the preposterously-named Adam Smith's freakish drive-by harassment of a (preternaturally Zen) Chick-Fil-A employee.I was struck by the incident's similarity to the famous "diner" scene in Five Easy Pieces (1970), right down to the "chicken": var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Five Easy Pieces Diner Scene', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); Ed quoted a film critic who held up that scene "as the point where American movies began to celebrate gratuitous anger."Anyone who's watched other drivers careen out of the parking lot after the latest Fast & Furious movie has to admit that films affect our behavior; that cinematic ideas and attitudes trickle into the cultural water table, and sometimes pollute it.To take one trivial instance: I've written before about the influence all those 1970s "Satanic children" flicks had on my decision not to have kids.Three other movie tropes from that era impacted audiences in ways that continue today.(Language and content warning:) var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Eddie Murphy is RAW while describing Italians and Rocky explicit HD', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2012/8/15/the-3-most-poisonous-movie-cliches-of-the-60s-and-70s/ previous Page 1 of 4 next   ]]>
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The Weekly Standard Staff2
The Weekly Standard



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The 'White Rat'
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Mark Felt—Watergate's 'Deep Throat'—wasn't interested in bringing down Nixon; he wanted the FBI's top job.
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    (Review Source)
  • Substandard Show Notes‐‐Episode 1.26
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Endnotes and digressions from the latest show: * We've been undergoing something of a Sonny-sance lately, with more and more of the world coming around to the idea that Sonny Bunch is always right. But this week's episode may have set that movement back by quite a bit. Because in talking about Marvel movies, Sonny was as wrong as he's ever been. * Sonny claims that none of the Marvel movies are really good and that a piece of dreck like Guardians of the Galaxy Volume 2 is just as good
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    (Review Source)

Conservative Film Buff1
Letterboxd



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)
  • Black Panther 2018 ★★★½
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Black Panther is, first and foremost, a Marvel movie. As such, it retains that “house anti-style,” as Sonny Bunch called it, that keeps any pretensions to greatness firmly in check. That said, this is good entertainment, and as great a Marvel movie as we’ve seen. This is a superhero movie with less superhero and more movie. The story is great and is, for me, the reason to see the movie. Think Lion King/Hamlet meets James Bond meets Atlas Shrugged (Yep, Wakanda is basically Galt's Gulch in Atlas Shrugged. Or Atlantis. Or El Dorado). And on top of these themes, director/co-writer
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    (Review Source)

American Renaissance1
American Renaissance



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Captain Marvel Hates You . . .
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    . . . so long as you are a “white dude.”

    The post Captain Marvel Hates You . . . appeared first on American Renaissance.

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The Weekly Substandard Podcast1
The Weekly Standard



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The Substandard Reviews Guardians of The Galaxy and Pizza!
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The Substandard discusses Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 —it was great, it was good, it was terrible! JVL gives us a rundown of the Substandard Season One, Sonny's theory on chain restaurants is challenged—by Sonny! Vic's not afraid of "street meat." Plus pizza rankings and a word from our sponsor, all on this week's episode of the Substandard! This week's episode of the Substandard is sponsored by Dollar Shave Club. Try the $5 starter box (a $15 value!) with free shipping by visiting:
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    (Review Source)

John Nolte1
Daily Wire / Breitbart



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • 'Ant-Man and the Wasp' Review: Nothing Deep, Just a Solid Action Comedy
    (”Captain America: Civil War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    if you have seen the Ant-Man and the Wasp trailer, you have pretty much seen the best parts of the movie.
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    (Review Source)

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