Back to the Future

Not rated yet!
Director
Robert Zemeckis
Runtime
1 h 56 min
Release Date
3 July 1985
Genres
Adventure, Comedy, Science Fiction, Family
Overview
Eighties teenager Marty McFly is accidentally sent back in time to 1955, inadvertently disrupting his parents' first meeting and attracting his mother's romantic interest. Marty must repair the damage to history by rekindling his parents' romance and - with the help of his eccentric inventor friend Doc Brown - return to 1985.
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  • Crispin Glover's Gripe with Back to the Future
    Lifestyle var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Crispin Glover Talks Back to the Future - IGN Keepin' It Reel Podcast', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); Back to the Future actor Crispin Glover sat down with IGN recently to talk about his experience filming the classic time-travel adventure. Glover only worked on the first film in the franchise, though his likeness and select footage from the first film was used in the second.In his interview with IGN, posted above, Glover explained some of the creative differences which contributed to his leaving the franchise. He objected to what he called “propaganda” in the film promoting “corporate interests.” Specifically, Glover felt that the ending of the first film, portraying the McFly family as happier and notably wealthier than when it began, sent the wrong message.The happier was fine to me. And the idea of the characters being in love, I thought was excellent. But I thought – I saw that if there was a kind of a financial reward, where the son character cheers because he has a truck in the garage – I thought that the moral aspect ends up being that money equals happiness. And I questioned that, and that was met with a lot of hostility and upset.Glover recalls watching old movies in revival houses as a teenager in Los Angeles, films which he felt “were questioning things.” He apparently did not want to be complicit in a film which takes for granted that “money equals happiness,” a message he felt deceived moviegoers into sacrificing their interests to that of corporations.Propaganda is essentially fooling people into believing that there’s something good for them, but it’s actually in the interests of the corporations. I mean, you can call anything propaganda. You can say what I’m saying right now is propaganda. I mean, you’re saying – it’s propagating an idea. But the kind of propaganda that I’m speaking of, that I think is very damaging, is the propaganda that is making people at large feel that what’s being put forth to them is good for their own interests. But in fact, it’s actually best for the corporate interests and it ends up hurting the people at large.And unfortunately, I think – even though there are very positive things about Back to the Future – there’s very good story structure. There was good writing within it. My argument was, if we just take out the element of wealth as a reward – and it was only that the characters were in love, I would like the film altogether wholly.The philosophical notion fueling Glover’s objection was that money should not matter if you pursue those things which you love. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2014/2/28/crispin-glovers-gripe-with-back-to-the-future/ previous Page 1 of 3 next   ]]>
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  • 6 Warnings I Would Send My Younger Self
    Lifestyle var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'BTTF 2: Young Biff meets Old Biff', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); Who has two thumbs and loves Back to the Future? This guy! Replete with such cornball humor, and stimulating the imagination to ponder mysteries of the universe like temporal displacement and women, the '80s popcorn adventures hold up to this day.As 2015 nears, boasting a movie release schedule packed with blockbuster franchises – everything from the next Star Wars to Avengers: Age of Ultron and Jurassic World – it saddens me to realize we won’t also see a revisiting of the Back to the Future universe. You may recall that 2015 was the year that Doc Brown and Marty McFly traveled to in the second film. That year will also mark the 30th anniversary of the franchise. A second volume of films centering around the disparity between 2015 as we will know it and the one encountered by Marty as a teenager carries a lot of potential. If only screenwriter Bob Gale and director Robert Zemeckis were reading.Much of the fun in Back to the Future emerges from a clash of generations, how things change over time -- and how they stay the same. The second film in the series addresses what might happen if you went back in time and told your younger self how to be successful. Marty McFly plots to take a sports almanac from 2015 back to 1985 so he can place bets on foreseen outcomes. When the book falls into the hands of an elderly and villainous Biff Tannen, he executes the same plan to disastrous effect.Sure, sending your younger self stock tips or sports scores may be an underhanded way to achieve your best life now. But that doesn’t mean there aren’t less scandalous messages you could send which might produce a better result. Here are 6 warnings I would send my younger self. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2013/12/7/6-warnings-i-would-send-my-younger-self/ previous Page 1 of 7 next   ]]>
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  • Is Big Government Holding Us Back...From the Future?
    PJ Media In the 1989 “Back to the Future” sequel, Marty McFly and “Doc” Emmett L. Brown travel to October 21, 2015 -- and the world is unrecognizable. “Where we’re going, we don’t need roads,” Doc Brown declares, as the DeLorean soars into the air.Contrary to the film’s prophetic vision, our cars don’t fly, or run on nuclear energy, converting trash into fuel. Our teenagers do not fly around on hover boards, and our shoes don’t automatically lace themselves up. What happened?Big government happened -- the explosion of regulation and administration has held America back from all sorts of innovations, from sunscreen to nuclear power. Last year, the government added 77,687 pages of federal regulations, costing American consumers and businesses nearly $1.9 trillion, according to the Competitive Enterprise Institute.The Affordable Care Act, also known as “Obamacare,” has created 13,000 pages of new regulations, caused a mass consolidation of the healthcare industry, and has increased prices across the board. No less than eight CO-OPs -- nonprofit insurers created by Obamacare -- have folded this year.On October 1, the Environmental Protection Agency finalized what may become the most expensive regulation in history, using false science to argue that making ozone rules even stricter will improve public health. Some are even claiming that, with self-driving cars, we need to make the switch to automated drivers, and outlaw human drivers. Talk about the furthest thing from flying cars.If you’re waiting for the nuclear-power generator where you turn your trash into energy, don’t hold your breath. Nuclear energy may be the safest, most effective, and least-polluting form of energy, but that doesn’t mean Obama will start issuing grants like the ones set up for solar and wind.If technology has been held back in recent years, why did “Back to the Future” predict that America would have flying cars, hoverboards, and widespread nuclear energy by 2015? class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/blog/is-big-government-holding-us-back-from-the-future/ previous Page 1 of 2 next   ]]>
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  • The 20 Best Films of the 1980s
    Lifestyle var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Arthur (1981) Trailer', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); Editor's Note: This is an expansion of Kyle Smith's list of the 10 best films of the 1980s published here in June. I've asked Kyle to expand his series as PJ Lifestyle begins offering more lists, articles, essays, and blog posts exploring culture, art, technology, and history by decade. Do you disagree with Kyle's choices? Do you have your own ideas for lists of movies or other cultural subjects? Which years and what subjects would you most like to see covered at PJ Lifestyle? Email: DaveSwindlePJM [@] gmail.com Also check out Kyle's top 10 movie picks for the '30s,  '40s, '50s, '60s, '70s,  '90s, and the '00s before he expands them to top 20s.20. Arthur (1981)A throwback to '30s screwball comedies, this light confection about a drunken playboy (Dudley Moore, in his prime) and the caustic butler (Oscar-winner John Gielgud) who serves as his counselor, nanny and father figure showcased Moore’s comic gifts but was also an oddly endearing buddy movie. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2014/9/12/the-20-best-films-of-the-1980s/ previous Page 1 of 20 next   ]]>
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  • This Mashup of Trump and 'Back to the Future' Will Give You Nightmares
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    PJ Media Marty McFly's reaction to Donald Trump's campaign announcement in the video above is perfect. I'm sure it's a sentiment shared by plenty of Americans who are horrified at the thought of Trump becoming the Republican nominee.It's actually uncanny how much Trump resembles Biff Tannen, the teen bully-turned gambling magnate from the 1985 hit, "Back to the Future II."Think I'm exaggerating? Take a look:  var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Trump To The Future', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); In the movie, Michael J. Fox stars as the time-traveling Marty McFly, who hops between 1955, 1985, and 2015 in his quest to prevent Biff Tannen from becoming a wife-hopping tyrant who "owns the cops" and gets what he wants as a result of threats and intimidation. Watch the clip below from the original movie, where Biff is described as "one of the richest and most powerful men in America." Visitors to a museum dedicated to honoring Biff are invited to learn how he "successfully lobbied to legalize gambling and turned Hill Valley's dilapidated courthouse into a beautiful casino-hotel!" They can also hear about his marriage to his third wife.“I’m the most successful person ever to run for the presidency, by far,” Trump recently bragged to the Des Moines Register. “Nobody’s ever been more successful than me. I’m the most successful person ever to run."It's uncanny, I tell you.Was Donald Trump's reality-TV-star-celebrity-presidential-candidate character inspired by the character Biff Tannen from the 1985 movie? Probably not. (Good grief, I hope not!) But as Biff says in the movie, "There's something very familiar about all this." var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Back to the Future Part 2 (7/12) Movie CLIP - Biff's World (1989) HD', 'videoType': 'Curated' });    class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/blog/this-mashup-of-trump-and-back-to-the-future-will-give-you-nightmares/ ]]>
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  • Ranking the Friday the 13th Films from Best to Worst
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle As a fan of slasher movies, I know they don't have the best rep. Shallow plots, lame characters, laughable acting (literally in some cases, intentionally or not) -- that's just the tip of the iceberg of what's not to like in a slasher movie, depending on your morals, anyway. But the genre has its fans for many reasons, whether the monster designs, the mythology and characters, or how convincingly the effects work can portray horrifying deaths. Or, let's be real,  just boobs and gore do it for some.Anyway, John Carpenter's Halloween (1978) was the first to codify this horror-subgenre, but Friday the 13th with its iconic villain Jason Voorhees is the archetype that more often comes to mind. Each film in the series, while by no means great works of art, have their charms and their downsides as pieces of horror fiction. What follows is the list of what areIN MY VAGUELY HUMBLE OPINIONthe films of the Friday the 13th franchise, from best to worst. var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Friday the 13th Part - IV: The Final Chapter - Trailer', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); Friday The 13th Part IV: The Final ChapterIf you were expecting the first movie in the series to be here, well, you were wrong. “Aged like a fine wine” would be kind of haughty and pretentious to say, but well, I already did. The Final Chapter is Friday the 13th at its best, and in its purest form, before it would resort to gimmickry in order to keep the series on life-support.This film is where the series would get its first major recurring character that wasn't Jason himself: Tommy Jarvis. Played by a pre-Goonies Corey Feldman, he would be the first, and despite the title's protestations, not the last to take down Jason for good. Hell, he did it twice, actually. Part 4 is also the first of an internal trilogy of sorts for the series, with parts 5 and 6 that I like to refer to as the Tommy Jarvis Saga. Tom Savini is back for some of the most impressive gore effects the series has to offer, lovingly crafted and staged for the film’s inexplicably likeable cast of characters.Part 4's hapless group of cannon fodder is drafted to be not much different from any of the other previous casts. However, their portrayals, while somewhat amateurish on occasion, are earnest, and thus I found them entertaining. Of note is a pre-Back to the Future Crispin Glover, with one of the most spastic dances ever put on film being a particular highlight. All said, if someone wanted to watch a dictionary definition-quality slasher film or the best example of a Friday the 13th movie, you could do worse, as you'll soon see. class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2014/10/29/ranking-the-friday-the-13th-films-from-best-to-worst/ previous Page 1 of 12 next   ]]>
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  • President Goldman Sachs Presents 'The Muppet Show,' Sponsored by GE
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Ed Driscoll Unexpectedly! "Weekly Jobless Claims Hit Higher Level Than Expected," a CNBC headline reports, using a variation on what Jim Geraghty dubbed a year ago, "the most common adverb of the Obama years."The It's Only Words blog replies:It’s always unexpected with these people. Seriously, can’t you picture the entire Obama Administration standing on the White House lawn, gazing eastward and marveling that the sun has risen yet again?The image will be that much sunnier, when the Photoshop I create last year for a Victor Davis Hanson post titled "The Coming Post-Obama Renaissance" becomes a reality:In the meantime, the Washington Dispatch contrasts today's malaise-ridden Obamaconomy with the recovery of the 1980s under President Reagan in graphic terms:Click over to their blog to see the two charts full size -- and then check out Jim Pethokoukis at the American Enterprise Blog, who writes, "I wish Obama could time travel back to 1980":In 1980, there were plenty of forecasters who thought the American standard of living would decline over coming decades. Just look at all the dystopian films back then: Blade Runner, Soylent Green, Americathon, Escape from New York. Gloomy stuff.But by the mid-1980s, those films were giving way to ones depicting a much sunnier tomorrow such as Back to the Future, Part II and the Star Trek revival. Indeed, from 1983-2007, U.S. real GDP grew by 3.3% a year, 2.2% on a per capital basis. Now, this was not as fast as the 1950s and 1960s when GDP growth averaged near 4%. But as Sumner explains, “Growth has been slower, but that’s true almost everywhere. What is important is that the neoliberal reforms in America have helped arrest our relative decline.And the key reforms, by the way, are lower marginal tax rates and less intrusion by government into markets and the private sector via deregulation, eliminating price controls, and privatization.Why would the president want to reverse course instead of recommitting America to the successful policies of the past decades?By the way, it isn't just the labor force that's shrunk under Mr. Obama, as CNBC noted earlier this month, with another "unexpected" subtext:It’s one of the biggest mysteries on Wall Street. How can stocks be in their fourth year of a bull market and trading activity be so low?During March, average daily volume in equity shares was at their lowest level since December 2007, according to new data from Credit Suisse. This is the same month that marked the three-year anniversary of the bull market that caused the Standard & Poor's 500 to double from its March 2009 credit-crisis low.Actually that same CNBC article partially clears up the mystery, but the reader has to click on a hyperlink embedded first. Buried much deeper in the same article is this little tidbit:“The financial industry has placed itself above the investing public ('muppets') and will take every advantage it can secure,” said Alan Newman, author of the Crosscurrents financial newsletter. “The public's confidence has been shattered, possibly beyond repair.”And buried within the word "muppets" is a link to an earlier CNBC story from late March:Goldman Sachs has begun scanning internal emails for the term "muppet" and other evidence that employees referred to clients in derogatory ways, Chief Executive Lloyd Blankfein told partners in a conference call this week, according to people familiar with the call.The company-wide email review comes after an executive director named Greg Smith resigned last week in a scathing op-ed column in the New York Times in which he said he saw five Goldman managing directors refer to clients as "muppets," at times over internal email.In the United States, "muppet" brings to mind lovable puppets such as Kermit the Frog, but in Britain "muppet" is slang for a stupid person.On the conference call with partners this week, Blankfein said the company was taking Smith's claims seriously and was conducting a review of his assertions, including the email scan, according to these people.Consider this another example of Blair's Law: Goldman Sachs, the company that thinks of its customers as "muppets," is deeply in bed with the Obama administration, right down to their fundraising operations. The leader of said administration thinks of most Americans as lethargic bitter clingers, typical white people, who've acted stupidly, who've become soft, and who have lost their imagination and willingness to go along with the big government projects he envisions for them. ("What about more smart grids?" "We need more moon shot!") class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/eddriscoll/2012/4/20/the-muppet-show/ previous Page 1 of 2 next   ]]>
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  • The Finest Movie about the Railroad Industry Since Silver Streak
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Ed Driscoll By the time I got around to seeing the long-long-long awaited film version of Atlas Shrugged, my expectations were so lowered by its reviews, as long as the actors didn’t bump into the scenery and I didn’t see a “MADE BY LIONEL” logo on any of the trains, I probably would have considered the film a success on some level.But actually, as the film unfolded and gathered steam -- to use an appropriately railroad-themed analogy -- I sorta, kinda, perhaps in spite of myself, began to like it. (WARNING: POSSIBLE SPOILERS AHEAD.) I’d say the film was more enjoyable than any of the Star Wars prequels, but that’s setting the bar awfully low, in retrospect. But I guess that’s the trade-off. In the era of political correctness, you can have zillion-dollar films that are shows about nothing, or a slightly stiff low-budget film that will give you plenty to talk—and argue—about afterwards.In his review at the Corner, Mark Steyn compares Atlas to “out-takes from Dynasty:”Incidentally, I finally got to see Atlas Shrugged The Movie, which has been roundly mocked by various reviewers, including on the right (PJ O’Rourke). I broadly agree with Andrew Stuttaford’s take. The design is kinda goofy and a lot of the acting is like out-takes from Dynasty, but it’s still about something in a way that any number of slicker products aren’t. And in particular it’s about an America in which government departments with benignly technocratic names regulate, cannibalize and confiscate private companies in the supposed interests of “equalizing” differences between states.Crazy, huh?Let’s stick with stuff that’s far more plausible – like Sean Penn’s Valerie Plame movie…Certainly the TV-movie-on-steroids feel of the film’s somewhat low-budget production values helps to create those Dynasty flashbacks, particularly in the film’s rather expository first two acts.And speaking of TV, it was fun watching the veteran character actors who fill the supporting roles. Look, it’s Michael Lerner, from the Starksky & Hutch pilot. It’s Jerry Seinfeld’s landlord! It’s Jimmy Barrett from the second season of Mad Men. It’s Quark! It’s the crooked cop who sold out Sonny Crockett to Frank Zappa on Miami Vice! And so on.Massive Suspension of Disbelief OvercomeAt the start of the film, the audience, particularly those who aren’t that familiar with the book, are faced with two massive suspensions of disbelief to overcome:As Kathy Shaidle joked, “Seriously, people. It’s about a railroad. In the future.”Rand’s legendary arch dialogue, which makes the tone of Woody Allen’s serious films such as Interiors seem like natural conversation.Let’s tackle that first part first. Given what blue screen and CGI is capable of these days, I would have preferred a much more stylized production design. Something along the lines of Mad Men meets Citizen Kane meets Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow, which would have placed the film in the 1930s through the 1950s, the golden-age of railroading, and perhaps tied it in visually as a sequel of sorts to the film version of The Fountainhead. But having seen the film, and understanding the budget constraints the filmmakers were under, I understand why the very slightly futuristic (read: contemporary) setting was chosen, as the filmmakers needed loads of ultra-high definition video shots of trains to make the film work. And certainly all of the realistic railroad shots (often shot at night or at sunrise/sunset to obscure the railroad names on the locomotives and passenger cars) help to set the stage for the digital effects employed to dramatize the rise of the John Galt Line in the film’s third act. (Incidentally, while we take railroads for granted, and cross-country passenger railroading was rendered superfluous by jet aviation, unlike Obama's fantasies of high speed passenger railroading, freight trains will likely be a vital part of how durable goods move across the country for decades to come.) class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/eddriscoll/2011/4/25/atlas_shrugged_review/ previous Page 1 of 2 next   ]]>
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Jay Dyer2
Esoteric Hollywood



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

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  • Back to the Future Trilogy...

    By: Jay Dyer In Part 1, we looked at the odd parallels to the Gremlins universe with Back to the Future, as well as 9/11.  We also saw how Marty’s...

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  • Back to the Future Trilogy...

    By: Jay Dyer Someone said they thought I had gone insane when they read my Goonies analysis, so I thought I would try to top them here. What to say...

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The Federalist Staff6
The Federalist



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • What Chuck Berry Taught Us About Cultural Appropriation
    My first memory of Chuck Berry came from the movie “Back to the Future.” In a famous scene at the Enchantment Under the Sea dance, Michael J. Fox’s character, Marty McFly, is pressed into playing guitar for the band and teaches them “Johnny B. Good.” The injured guitarist, Marvin Berry, calls his brother Chuck, and lets him hear the amazing sound over the phone. It’s a cute joke that has been ubiquitous on social media since Berry’s death. But it is also one that is loaded in 2017 in ways that it was not in 1985, when ‘Back to the Future’ premiered. What didn’t exist in the popular consciousness in 1985, but does now, is the concept of Cultural Appropriation. The concept argues that members of a dominant culture should not take the cultural products of a non-dominant culture and attempt to make them their own. Greg Tate’s 2003 book, “Everything but the Burden,” helped to popularize the concept, which had bubbled in academia throughout the 1990s. Rock and Roll, as it turns out, is a popular example used by those who argue against cultural appropriation. In this 2014 Salon article, “Elvis Wasn’t the First to Steal Black Music: 10 White Artists who ‘Borrowed’ from R & B Before the King,” we’re told that black artists invented Rock and Roll, and it was stolen by white artists such as Elvis Presley. Rock And Roll Has A Complex Cultural Story This makes the “Back to the Future” joke somewhat more sinister today: white people didn’t steal Rock and Roll, they travelled back in time to teach it to black people. But while it is true that black artists, especially blues guitarists, had an outsized influence on Rock and Roll—one that was not sufficiently compensated or celebrated—the real story is, not surprisingly, more complex. And perhaps no artists’ work tells that complex story of cultural mixology better than Chuck Berry’s. Chuck Berry’s first big hit was “Maybelline,” with legendary Chess Records in 1955. Chess was looking for a new sound, something fresh that didn’t sound like traditional black Rhythm and Blues. What Berry brought them was a guitar-driven version of a country song, “Ida Ray.” The country sound, favored by white artists, was taken from a fiddle tune. It balanced the blues elements, making them lighter, airier, and more flexible. Some believe that in “Maybelline,” and then the next year with “Roll Over Beethoven,” also rooted in a country sound, Chuck Berry invented rock guitar. It’s hard to imagine the world before a guitar and hella good hair were the signature of music icons. But in 1955, the electric guitar was just starting to overtake horns as the dominant soloing instrument. Not only did it possess enough musical dexterity to command the spotlight, the guitar gave performers like Berry the freedom to express themselves physically, as Berry would do famously by duck walking across the stage. How Chuck Berry Took The Musical World By Storm But if Berry took liberally and wisely from the musical traditions of different American cultures, he also paid it forward by bringing his astounding new sound across the Atlantic. A whole generation of British guitarists and songwriters would use his style to plot their invasion of the United States. The Rolling Stones, The Beatles, The Kinks, and many others drew direct inspiration from the sound that Berry had invented. Even after his success and fame, Stones guitarist Keith Richards can be seen on film, learning at the knee of his mentor. Some great artists live so long that their deaths are not milestone, but natural events. Last year’s deaths of Prince and David Bowie at relatively young ages came as a shock in a way Berry’s did not. At 90, not only was his death certain to come soon, he was also several decades removed from his active music career. Most people alive today only know his music as “oldies.” But even though his songs now summon images of the distant past, like hot rods and poodle skirts, as a principle inventor of Rock and Roll, Berry created something that remains alive, fresh, and powerful. There is a point at which a phenomenon becomes so huge, so global, it defies any specific cultural identity. Concepts like democracy and games like chess operate in this way: they are no longer Greek or Indian, they are universal. Such is the case with Rock and Roll. Berry Created Music That Transcends Culture This is why overzealous complaints about cultural appropriation are ultimately self-defeating. For a cultural phenomenon to fully blossom and flourish, it must pass through many hands. Attempts to keep cultural output pure and proprietary deny that output the ability to reach its potential. The dominant culture in American society is made of myriad influences—for the very reason that it takes from all. In helping to invent Rock and Roll, Chuck Berry did not just create a great symbol of America. He created a great art form of the world. And he did it by taking what he needed musically, regardless of the demographics of its creators. He took advantage of the good in both Blues and Country. In so doing, he created a musical lingua franca—a style of music that is not only enjoyed, but also created in almost every culture on Earth. Viewed in this way, Marty McFly choosing Chuck Berry’s “Johnnie B. Good” as the seminal example of 1950’s rock is a great and deserved compliment. After all, the real joke is that Marty invents Rock and Roll—a new sound so vital and compelling that it stuns the crowd and becomes arguably the most popular form of music in the world. “Back to the Future” is just a movie. Chuck Berry was real. With an open ear and an open mind, he helped to create an art form that is, above all, human. ]]>
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  • How Small American Movie Theaters Stood Up To North Korean Thuggery
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    How Small American Movie Theaters Stood Up To North Korean Thuggery While everyone else chattered about North Korea’s threats regarding ‘The Interview,’ small theaters took action for free speech. January 6, 2015 By Jeremy Lott Just before New Year’s, I bought a membership from Bellingham, Washington’s Pickford Film Center. The plastic membership card comes with a few perks, but that’s not why I signed up. Normally it’s best to follow Groucho Marx’s sage advice and refuse to join any organization that would admit one as a member. However, this once I joined for patriotic reasons. No, that isn’t a punchline. December brought one of the more humiliating cultural events in recent American history. Hackers who could be connected with the Communist dictatorship of North Korea stole data from and threatened Sony. They also threatened anyone who would have the effrontery to watch the movie studio’s new gross-out comedy “The Interview,” about a couple of bumbling television journalists whom the CIA asks to “take out” Kim Jong-un. Hollywood caved in every way that it is possible to cave to this theoretical theatrical threat from an isolated pygmy kingdom. All five large movie chains canceled plans to show “The Interview.” Sony said it would not release the movie on Christmas as scheduled—or, potentially, ever. Execs in other studios refused to sign a petition circulated by George Clooney to get Sony’s back and support that freedom of expression they usually claim to hold dear. The Bigs Bluster and Hide This was George McFly-level cinematic cowardice. As we might expect from watching “Back to the Future,” it had ripple effects. Fox refused to distribute a planned Steve Carrell movie about North Korea, forcing its cancellation. The Texas-based Alamo Drafthouses said that if they couldn’t air “The Interview” on Christmas they would re-screen the 2004 puppet extravaganza “Team America: World Police,” which mocked former North Korean strongman Kim Jong-il. Paramount wouldn’t allow it, for fear of foreign hackers and U.S. trial lawyers if something violent happened at a theater. Sony could still stream it online, of course, but that’s not quite the same thing, in terms of revenue or shared experience—and it would be subject to piracy on a massive scale. Most Americans who paid any attention to this unfolding spectacle found it intolerable. They tried to find some way to register their disapproval. Without “The Interview” to watch, even to stream online, folks organized “Team America” watching parties and wrote about it on social media. Finally, President Obama, whose own FBI arrested the filmmaker of the “Innocence of Muslims” YouTube video a few years ago to placate Islamist rioters, said in a press conference that Sony had “made a mistake” and ought to release the movie. Sony said it would like to do just that, Mr. President. The only problem was, how? The movie chains had all refused to show “The Interview.” Suppose the president’s words could calm them and change their minds about spooling those reels. There was still a problem. The chains had already locked up all their screens with commitments to other movies for the Christmas release date. Sony could still stream it online, of course, but that’s not quite the same thing, in terms of revenue or shared experience—and it would be subject to piracy on a massive scale. Small Theaters Stand Up That was the point when the Pickford Film Center swooped in to help save the day. It, and about 300 other small independent theaters took stock of the risks and the controversy. They stood up and said, “Give us the movie. We will show it.” Indie theaters showed it, and the crowds showed up. So indie theaters showed it, and the crowds showed up. According to BoxOfficeMojo.com, the movie took in $3.3 million in its first six days of release. That may not sound like a lot, but this was on, at most, 331 screens in small auditoriums with lower ticket prices, fewer showings than usual in larger theaters, and next to zero advance notice. Right-of-center folks have quarreled over how we should respond to threats on Sony’s film. In these cyber pages, Rebecca Cusey argued that while she could usually “take or leave” co-star/writer/director Seth Rogen’s films, that was not the right call this time. When thugs tells a “free people” that they aren’t allowed to watch something they had better “damn well watch it,” Cusey said. Joe Carter raised a social conservative harrumph on the blog of the Acton Institute. “Freedom lovers,” Carter wrote, “don’t have an obligation to watch some lame raunchy comedy simply because it was threatened by terrorists associated with North Korea.” Rather, we ought to push for changes in American law so that opportunistic lawyers can’t hold any violence related to a movie against the theaters. Free Minds and Markets Preserve Free Speech While we were jaw-jawing about this, hundreds of small business owners and non-profit organizations charged in and provided public venues for hundreds of thousands of Americans to watch the movie. Many of these owners and workers at these theaters have quite left-of-center politics, but they proved willing to take a chance for freedom of speech. Our indie theater had decided to show the film, she said, to support that very ‘American freedom to see whatever movie you want.’ That’s certainly the case with Pickford, which has free screenings of human rights documentaries, “non-GMO” popcorn, and special green handles on the toilets to conserve water. “This isn’t normally the sort of movie we show here,” a super perky female worker with thick black hipster glasses told the sold-out crowd Saturday night before awarding a coupon for free Mallard’s ice cream to one lucky moviegoer. They had decided to do so, she said, to support that very “American freedom to see whatever movie you want.” Pickford and hundreds of theaters showed the film to sellout crowds without incident. This only proved what an empty threat the larger chains and Sony had caved to. Now the movie might find wider distribution, both in America and abroad. There’s even talk of air-dropping copies into North Korea, although the shortage of televisions there might be an obstacle. Whether or not you think it’s a good idea to see “The Interview,” it was the Pickfords of this country that gave us the opportunity to go out and do so and laugh together, freely. I don’t know if free-speech-loving conservative Americans have a moral obligation to open their wallets for this, but it seemed altogether right and proper that this American do so. Plus, as the lady at the counter told me as she was wrestling with the computer to process my membership and grousing that it must have been hacked by North Koreans, “Our popcorn has real butter.” Hard to argue with that. Jeremy Lott is a senior fellow at Defense Priorities. free speech Kim Jong-Un movie theaters North Korea Seth Rogen Sony The Interview Copyright © 2017 The Federalist, a wholly independent division of FDRLST Media, All Rights Reserved. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1463670073398-2'); }); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({mode:'thumbs-2r', container:'taboola-below-main-column-mix', placement:'below-main-column', target_type:'mix'}); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({flush:true}); 0 Comments /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'thefederalist23'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. comments powered by Disqus ]]>
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  • 'Tomorrowland': The Best Big-Budget Version Of Classic Disney
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Modernizing nostalgia is a tricky thing to pull off. For every “retro-futuristic” film that works, such as “Back To The Future,” there are at several half-baked flops. Think “Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow,” “Mars Attacks,” or Peter Jackson’s wretched “King Kong” remake. Writer-director Brad Bird’s science fiction film “Tomorrowland,” released today onto DVD, visually basks in updated 1950s Googie architecture, at once softened and brightened by the addition of twenty-first-century CGI textures. Much of the movie’s special-effects work, from the eponymous (if never actually stated onscreen) city to a spectacular baroque spacecraft, looks consciously lifted from Walt Disney’s 1955-57 “Man In Space” TV specials, which were produced in cooperation with NASA’s Werner Von Braun. The movie is awash in Disney iconography, from a fantastic city straight out of the original designs for Epcot Center to a glorious (if, sadly, fictional) comic book and memorabilia shop touting a vinyl soundtrack album from Disney’s 1979 sci-fi bust, “The Black Hole.” Human-imitating mechanical characters take offense at being referred to as “robots,” preferring Disney’s term, “audio-animatronics,” used in our real world to describe the denizens of the Hall of Presidents and other theme park attractions. The film’s basic plot—a plucky, smart teen takes off on a wild adventure, saving the day thanks to her own ingenuity and tenacious, optimistic character—is straight out of innumerable Disney live-action movies from the 1960s and ’70s. For anyone who spent their childhoods parked in front of the set on Sunday nights (a population which surely includes one Phillip Bradley Bird, late of Kalispel, Montana), “Tomorrowland” is essentially the best, biggest-budget episode of “The Wonderful World of Disney” ever produced. A Frustrated Animating Creative Bird fell in love with Disney animation at an early age and, based on an early self-made animated short, became the teenaged protégé of Milt Kahn, one of the Disney Studio’s “Nine Old Men,” the core group of animators responsible for “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” and the rest of the studio’s classic-era cartoons. One of the last hand-animated features released by that studio, the movie later found its audience on home video and is now considered a modern classic. But by the time Bird was old enough to join the Disney company himself, the studio had lapsed into making charmless formula movies like “The Fox and The Hound.” Bird’s initial tenure there was frustrating, and brief. After leaving, he helmed the single-best episode of Steven Spielberg’s 1980s anthology series, “Amazing Stories,” a 22-minute masterpiece called “The Family Dog,” which was later spun off into a quickly-canceled weekly series. Bird enjoyed more success as a key member of the early writing and animation teams for “The Simpsons” before returning to feature-length animation for Warner Brothers in the mid-90s. Once again, the timing was bad. Bird’s brilliant feature directing debut, “The Iron Giant,” produced just before Warner dismantled its animation division, was saddled with a terrible promotion plan and vanished on arrival in theaters in 1999. One of the last hand-animated features released by that studio, the movie later found its audience on home video and is now considered a modern classic. Celebrating Individuals’ Contributions to Society Part of that audience was John Lasseter, the co-founder and creative genius behind Steve Jobs’ Pixar studio. Lasseter, a former classmate of Bird’s from the California Institute of the Arts (notably, a school Bird had attended on Disney-funded scholarship) invited Bird to pitch a new animated film for the studio. The end result was 2004’s Oscar-winning smash, “The Incredibles,” followed up by 2007’s also-Oscar-winning also-smash, “Ratatouille.” ‘Tomorrowland’ is Bird’s first produced original concept for a live-action film, and as such, it’s one that’s close to the filmmaker’s own heart and sensibilities. Bird’s live-action directing debut, 2011’s “Mission Impossible—Ghost Protocol,” was another box-office hit. “Tomorrowland” is Bird’s first produced original concept for a live-action film, and as such, it’s one that’s close to the filmmaker’s own heart and sensibilities. Bird revealed in interviews for “Tomorrowland” that he had declined the dream job of re-inventing “Star Wars” for the big screen in order to complete it. Besides his ample abilities as a visual storyteller, Bird is one of the few screenwriters for big-budget action movies who’s both willing and able to inject ideas into his scripts, and not always ideas that modern audiences would expect from big-bang Hollywood blockbusters. Like “The Incredibles” and “Ratatouille,” “Tomorrowland” carries on and amplifies Bird’s recurring theme of the impact remarkable individuals have on their society. In this case, the plot’s kickstart comes from the recruitment of two gifted young people, roughly 50 years apart, to join a secret band of (in the film’s words) “Dreamers.” The first, an eleven-year-old boy played by Thomas Robertson set in 1954 and subsequently by George Clooney as a disaffected middle-aged man in the present day, is a wunderkind inventor who was invited into but then cast out of an advanced technological society by leaders who lost interest in the creative impulse. “Tomorrowland’s” protagonist, a modern-day teenager and NASA devotee named Casey Newton (played by Britt Robertson), gives voice to Bird’s opinions about the value of personal optimism. Her dramatic arc is a familiar one, not far removed from the Alvin Fernalds and Dexter Rileys of innumerable live-action Disney movies made for children in the last century. Try the Opposite of Dystopia for a Change The late French cartoonist Jean Giraud, better known to American audiences by his pseudonym “Moebius,” often opined that it is far easier to create a fictional negative future than a positive one. Giraud preferred the latter in his own work, taking it as more of a creative challenge. Bird obviously agrees, criticizing the current spate of dystopian fiction and its detrimental effects on the broader culture via the character of David Nix, Tomorrowland’s sort-of-villain, played by Hugh Laurie. The plot is suitably dizzying, with slam-bang action set pieces neatly tied together by Bird’s earnest dialogue. Looking forward through the past in “Tomorrowland” extends beyond the fantastical technology and Disney-World-on-steroids design. Casey enjoys a level of personal freedom more familiar to the “free-range” children of the ’70s and ’80s than today’s heavily supervised teens—I suspect a deliberate choice on Bird’s part. Hers is a world where the gently-moonlit nights belong to the kids, the reality of which their parents rarely have any notion of (another theme that’s repeated in her world’s fictional extra-dimensional doppleganger). Taken as a whole, “Tomorrowland” is an archetypical summer movie for the teen and pre-teen set (again, not unlike all those Disney flicks of old) that parents and other adults can enjoy as well. The plot is suitably dizzying, with slam-bang action set pieces neatly tied together by Bird’s earnest dialogue. For all its charms, however, it has to be admitted that this is not Bird’s best film. The third act has more than a few narrative bumps. I choose (admittedly, with no evidence) to blame those on co-screenwriter and Destroyer of Fictional Worlds Damon Lindelof, but there’s no getting around the conclusion that, like its imaginary namesake, Bird’s creation in this case is something of a grand failure. Despite a huge promotional push “Tomorrowland” died at the box office last summer, earning only $95 million against a $190 million budget. Adult audiences complained, not unfairly, that the movie was neither fish nor fowl, falling somewhere in between a modern CGI extravaganza and a straight children’s film. After opening night, most moviegoers stayed away from “Tomorrowland” in droves. But, as “The Iron Giant” proved, there’s always life after the multiplex, and “Tomorrowland” will be released on home video October 13. If you have kids, nieces or nephews, or even bored neighbors pining for their next summer break, “Tomorrowland” is still close to required viewing. They’ll love the adventure and action, and along the way, they’ll be exposed to sentiments they aren’t going to hear coming out of Hollywood very often. ]]>
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  • ‘Ready Player One’ Is A Kitchen Sink Throwback Failure
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The film is essentially a bizarre 'things were better back then' attempt to ignore not only the future but also the present by clinging to the past.
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  • ‘Avengers: Endgame’ Wraps Up Epic Marvel Storyline With Fateful, Fantastic Finale
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    It's not perfect, but 'Avengers: Endgame' comes close enough that even the most superhero-saturated, seen-it-all fan will love it.
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Millennial Woes1
Scandza Forum



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

⚠️ EDGY 🔥 CONTENT 🔥 WARNING 🔥 (NSFW?) ⚠️

🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻


  • My Entire DVD Collection [multi-parter] | Back to the Future Triology | 3:17:31 | 👎
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
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Christian Toto2
Hollywood In Toto



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • ‘Framing Delorean’ Is a One of a Kind Documentary
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    framing delorean review

    “Framing John DeLorean,” the new documentary by John Argott and Sheena M. Joyce, presents the infamous story of the automotive innovator in a manner that is positively nutty.

    The narrative

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  • ‘The Last Starfighter’ – Still the Best Video Game Movie
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    the last starfighter 40th anniversary

    Nick Castle’s “The Last Starfighter” remains the best video game movie to date and, fittingly, hit theaters when home gaming systems had just started to become a household standard.

    Lance

    The post ‘The Last Starfighter’ – Still the Best Video Game Movie appeared first on Hollywood in Toto.

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Plugged In1
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Did ’80s Movies Reinforce Rape Culture?
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    Some of us who grew up in the ’80s likely have fond memories of John Hughes’ “classic” teen movies: Sixteen Candles. Breakfast Club. Or maybe we recall how much we loved Back to the Future. Or Ghostbusters. Say Anything. Or Big. Now, all of those movies have some content issues, from a Plugged In perspective. […]

    The post Did ’80s Movies Reinforce Rape Culture? appeared first on Plugged In Blog.

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National Review Staff1
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The Eighties: A Sequel
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    To judge by recent pop culture, we miss the decade.
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John Podhoretz1
Commentary Magazine



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Infinity War: Crowded Crossover
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
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Mark Steyn2
Fox News



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The Ring Two
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Mark Steyn The Ring Two 15, selected cinemas Ihate to dismiss entire genres, but I’m not sure I get the whole Americanisation-ofJapanese-horror-movies thing. In the Japanese originals, the point seems to be that you get all the schlocko clichés of Hollywood horror but filtered through a Japanese sensibility. When you move them back to America, what you’re mostly left with is the clichés. The
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  • The Great Stone Face
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    This month marks the one hundredth anniversary of the motion picture debut of Buster Keaton - in Fatty Arbuckle's film The Butcher Boy. Mark looks back at one of the silent screen's most lustrous stars: He liked to cook and he knew how to make a custard
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Steve Sailer1
Taki Mag



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Shrek: Not So Popular with the Public, But a Hit with the Critics
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Hollywood’s clean little secret is that many people in the industry are not, at least by natural inclination, the utter shlockmeisters that their output would suggest. They are often cultivated, tasteful, hard-working craftsmen sometimes pained by the trashiness the public demands from them. Over the last decade, the animated Shrek franchise about a green ogre in a tawdry fairy tale land has offered perhaps the most flagrant example of What the People Want (and Deserve to Get, Good and Hard). Yet, in Shrek Forever After, its latest (and likely last) installment, the filmmakers have moved in a surprising new direction. The typical billion-dollar box office property, such as the Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, or Spider-Man series, is based on an elaborate preexisting work whose integrity is jealously guarded by fanboys. In contrast, the 2001 Shrek was a surprise hit derived merely from a 32-page bedtime book by William Steig, allowing the franchise to become a tabula rasa pandering to median 21st century tastes. The first Shrek had evolved into a poison pen letter from DreamWorks executive Jeffrey Katzenberg, the former Disney studio head during its Beauty and the Beast silver age, to his ex-boss Michael Eisner. Shrek’s villain, Lord Farquaad, was modeled on Eisner, who had tried to cheat Katzenberg out of his share of Disney profits (eventually settling for, reportedly, $280 million). You might have expected that the audience for a family film would have either been oblivious to or alienated by this backstory of Hollywood venality. Instead, they were galvanized. The meta-joke of Shrek was how DreamWorks’ crudely animated versions of public domain Disney characters (such as three small pigs or a wooden boy) tiptoed right up to but didn’t quite violate Disney’s notoriously well-defended copyrights. It’s remarkable that the public now gets intellectual property humor, but also a little depressing. “The inevitability of the demise of the franchise appears to have liberated the filmmakers in their last trip to the well to make a movie they won’t be ashamed to someday show their grandchildren.” Katzenberg had previously overseen the revitalization of Disney feature cartoons. His key decision had been to follow the suggestion of lyricist Howard Ashman, who died of AIDS in 1991, that they envision The Little Mermaid as an animated Broadway musical. Disney subsequently made billions off the daddy’s little princess market, but alienated older boys in the process. (Although modern Americans love to congratulate themselves on their urbane tolerance, elementary school children have come to use “gay” as an all-purpose insult.) Katzenberg strove to occupy the boys’ animated feature niche by positioning Shrek as the anti-princess movie. The original Shrek was good, nasty fun, with Eddie Murphy’s performance as a talking donkey one of the funniest instances of comic relief in the history of animated features. But Cameron Diaz (Charlie’s Angels) was cast as the princess merely because she was the blonde of the moment, and Mike Myers (Austin Powers)—who is a sketch comedian, not a leading man—was dull as the title monster. Using movie stars as voice actors ought to be a waste of money because there are superlative voice talents available who can’t be screen stars because they don’t look like their voices sound. For example, the great cartoon slob Homer Simpson is wonderfully voiced by Dan Castellaneta, a trim, prim yuppie. Moreover, this cartoon fairy tale’s abhorrence for all that girly stuff, like singing and dancing, meant that to fill up the time that would be taken up by songs in a classic Disney feature, the filmmakers deployed a lot of crud: fart jokes, disposable pop-culture references, and industry insider snark. With no further source material to draw upon for the 2004 sequel Shrek 2, the DreamWorks team tapped the collective id of the American public, concocting one of the most noxious movies of the decade: a stew of sex jokes for nine-year-olds, Rodeo Drive consumer cravings, and Inside Hollywood shtick. Meanwhile, the three stars formed a cartel who demanded (and received) $10 million each for the easy gig of voice acting, even though Myers and Diaz were eminently replaceable. Not surprisingly, the public adored all this hoo-ha. 2004’s Shrek 2 was a colossal four-quadrant smash with young and old, male and female, taking in $441 million at the domestic box office. Shrek the Third grossed a mere $323 million, however. The inevitability of the demise of the franchise appears to have liberated the filmmakers in their last trip to the well to make a movie they won’t be ashamed to someday show their grandchildren. Thus, Shrek Forever After is an unexpectedly sweet little film. There’s nothing original in it, but it borrows from the best: It’s a Wonderful Life, The Wizard of Oz, and Back to the Future. And, instead of hiring, say, Adam Sandler to voice the new villain Rumpelstiltskin, they just let animator Walt Dohrn play his own character. He’s better than Sandler would have been. Of course, the public is not pleased. Despite inflated 3D ticket prices, Shrek Forever After opened with a first weekend haul of $71 million, down more than $50 million from the forgettable third installment. googletag.cmd.push(function() {googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1456852648633-0');}); if(display_ads_server){document.write('');}; SIGN UPDaily updates with TM’s latest // delete this script tag and use a "div.mce_inline_error{ XXX !important}" selector // or fill this in and it will be inlined when errors are generated var mc_custom_error_style = ''; var fnames = new Array();var ftypes = new Array();fnames[0]='EMAIL';ftypes[0]='email';fnames[1]='FNAME';ftypes[1]='text';fnames[2]='LNAME';ftypes[2]='text';var err_style = ''; try{ err_style = mc_custom_error_style; } catch(e){ err_style = 'margin: 1em 0 0 0; padding: 1em 0.5em 0.5em 0.5em; background: ERROR_BGCOLOR none repeat scroll 0% 0%; font-weight: bold; float: left; z-index: 1; width: 80%; -moz-background-clip: -moz-initial; -moz-background-origin: -moz-initial; -moz-background-inline-policy: -moz-initial; color: ERROR_COLOR;'; } var mce_jQuery = jQuery.noConflict(); mce_jQuery(document).ready( function($) { var options = { errorClass: 'mce_inline_error', errorElement: 'div', errorStyle: err_style, onkeyup: function(){}, onfocusout:function(){}, onblur:function(){} }; var mce_validator = mce_jQuery("#mc-embedded-subscribe-form").validate(options); options = { url: 'http://takimag.us1.list-manage1.com/subscribe/post-json?u=0ba7696a8a378946b7e688500&id=f7706afea2&c=?', type: 'GET', dataType: 'json', contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8", beforeSubmit: function(){ mce_jQuery('#mce_tmp_error_msg').remove(); mce_jQuery('.datefield','#mc_embed_signup').each( function(){ var txt = 'filled'; var fields = new Array(); var i = 0; mce_jQuery(':text', this).each( function(){ fields[i] = this; i++; }); mce_jQuery(':hidden', this).each( function(){ if ( fields[0].value=='MM' && fields[1].value=='DD' && fields[2].value=='YYYY' ){ this.value = ''; } else if ( fields[0].value=='' && fields[1].value=='' && fields[2].value=='' ){ this.value = ''; } else { this.value = fields[0].value+'/'+fields[1].value+'/'+fields[2].value; } }); }); return mce_validator.form(); }, success: mce_success_cb }; mce_jQuery('#mc-embedded-subscribe-form').ajaxForm(options); }); function mce_success_cb(resp){ mce_jQuery('#mce-success-response').hide(); mce_jQuery('#mce-error-response').hide(); if (resp.result=="success"){ mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(resp.msg); mce_jQuery('#mc-embedded-subscribe-form').each(function(){ this.reset(); }); } else { var index = -1; var msg; try { var parts = resp.msg.split(' - ',2); if (parts[1]==undefined){ msg = resp.msg; } else { i = parseInt(parts[0]); if (i.toString() == parts[0]){ index = parts[0]; msg = parts[1]; } else { index = -1; msg = resp.msg; } } } catch(e){ index = -1; msg = resp.msg; } try{ if (index== -1){ mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(msg); } else { err_id = 'mce_tmp_error_msg'; html = '
    '+msg+''; var input_id = '#mc_embed_signup'; var f = mce_jQuery(input_id); if (ftypes[index]=='address'){ input_id = '#mce-'+fnames[index]+'-addr1'; f = mce_jQuery(input_id).parent().parent().get(0); } else if (ftypes[index]=='date'){ input_id = '#mce-'+fnames[index]+'-month'; f = mce_jQuery(input_id).parent().parent().get(0); } else { input_id = '#mce-'+fnames[index]; f = mce_jQuery().parent(input_id).get(0); } if (f){ mce_jQuery(f).append(html); mce_jQuery(input_id).focus(); } else { mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(msg); } } } catch(e){ mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').show(); mce_jQuery('#mce-'+resp.result+'-response').html(msg); } } } ]]>
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Hugh Hewitt1
Salem Radio Network



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Governor Chris Christie On Tomorrow's Hearing and Donald Trump And The The 2016 Race,
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    New Jersey Governor Chris Christie of New Jersey Opened today’s show: Audio: 10-21hhs-christie Transcript: HH: Vice President Joseph Biden is not running for president. A man who is, is New Jersey Governor Chris Christie. He joins me now. Governor Christie, welcome, it’s always a pleasure to have you, thank you for joining me. CC: Thank you, Hugh, happy to be back. HH: Tell me what your reaction to Joe Biden’s decision is? CC: I’m not the least bit surprised. I think I said this on CBS earlier today that I didn’t think the Vice President would run. And it’s from knowing him for many years. You know, we went to the same college, albeit at a different time, but we’ve gotten to know each other over the years because of that. I know how grief-stricken the Vice President was over the loss of his son, and I just couldn’t believe that he was going to undertake this type of, this type of challenge when he was still grieving the loss of his son. And so I’m not surprised by the decision. He still has my sympathy. I can’t imagine what it would be like to lose a child in that way. And I so I wish the Vice President all the best, but I’m not surprised by his decision. HH: Now Governor, before I turn to serious matters of campaigns and policy, I have to ask you about this story about you and Little League today. Were you a member of the Little League Hall of Fame? CC: I am a member of the Little League Hall of Fame. Yes, I am, Hugh. HH: What, to what do you credit that achievement? What did you do? CC: Charm, good looks, and a lot of home runs. HH: So you could go yard? CC: I went yard frequently, Hugh, 15 home runs. HH: Holy smokes. That’s very impressive. And unfortunately, it said in the same story that you were a Johnny Bench fan. You were rooting for the wrong Ohio club. The Indians are the real Ohio baseball club, and you got stuck with… CC: (laughing) You know, listen, they asked me who my catching idol was. And I don’t know who the catcher was for the Indians in those days… HH: Ray Fosse. CC: But you know, listen, ever since Ray got run over by Pete Rose, things kind of went south. And I was a Johnny Bench fan. HH: Okay, that was a very good catch. You know your baseball, Governor. Very good catch. CC: I do, sir. HH: Let’s get to the serious stuff. There’s a big hearing tomorrow against the likely person you’ll be running against if you’re the Republican nominee. I would like to ask you as a prosecutor who had access to classified information that what I hope they elicit as an admission from the former Secretary of State tomorrow. Does classified material need to be marked classified to be classified? CC: No, no it does not, and she knows that. And the fact is that the biggest problem, and I hope, and I have confidence in Congressman Gowdy, I hope that what they elicit tomorrow is finally to get her to answer some questions and tell the American people the truth, and to be held accountable. What everybody in leadership positions need to be willing to do is to be held accountable. And this Secretary of State has not been willing to do that, and at the same time, has the audacity to be asking for a promotion. HH: Now after that admission, which I hope is elicited, comes this question. Could the ARB, which the former Secretary of State, the Accountability Review Board, to which she always points, or the other Congressional hearings, to which she always points, have had any meaningful deliberations without access to what was on her secret server and the classified information thereon? CC: You know, it’s, I think it’s very hard for her to make that argument, Hugh. I think it really is. And that’s the problem with, you know, having all of your business done on a private email server, that even the president of the United States says he didn’t know she had. That’s really problematic for the American people, and it’s problematic, as you’ve seen, to having cabinet members’, you know, AOL accounts being hacked into. I mean, this is not the font of national security, apparently, over there at the Obama administration. HH: One of your comments as well, Governor Christie, on embassy security and her responsibility, she explained to Jake Tapper this past week that look, that was up to the professionals in the Department of State, not the Secretary of State, which is an odd argument. If anything under your control as governor of New Jersey gets overrun, I assume you’re responsible for it. And what do you make of her argument that that’s below my pay grade? CC: Listen, you’re ultimately accountable for everything that happens on your watch. And there have been things that have happened on my watch in New Jersey that I’m not happy about, and you have to be held accountable for them. And the fact is that she refuses to be held accountable. And that’s what I think drives the American people the most crazy, and what I think will prevent her from ever being president of the United States. It’s just that she refuses to take accountability for anything but those things that she believes to have been a success. HH: Governor Christie, in the aftermath of Bridgegate, you came out and gave the endless press conference. It may still be going on somewhere, I don’t know. CC: (laughing) It feels like it. HH: Could she, I watched every minute of it. It was an amazing press conference. Could she put on that kind, could she expose herself to that kind of inquiry with regards to Benghazi and the embassy and the Libyan adventure? CC: She could, but she won’t. She won’t, because she doesn’t think the American people are entitled to know the truth. And that’s why she had a private email server in the first place, because she didn’t want the American people to know what she was up to, what she was up to as Secretary of State, what the Clinton Foundation was up to, what was going on with her emails to Sidney Blumenthal. She didn’t want anybody to know that stuff, and I think she wouldn’t put herself in front of the press for an endless press conference, one hour and fifty minutes, I did, and took every question until they had no more questions. She wouldn’t do something like that, because she doesn’t believe the American people are entitled to know. You remember what she said to Ed Henry when he said I have three questions. She said I’ll give you one, because I believe that’s what you’re entitled to. HH: Correct. Correct. CC: I am, listen, Her Majesty, Queen Hillary, believes that…only right that she gets to be president of the United States, and I look forward to being the guy on the stage next September who will prosecute the case against her, and her liberal vision and policies for America, and the way she conducted herself in public life, and to being elected president. HH: Now Governor Christie, I sat across from you at that first debate, and I’m coming back in December, and again in March, to be a participant. I’m looking forward to that. You clearly think you can beat, Chris Christie, that Chris Christie can beat Hillary Clinton. But as you look down that row, are there others up there that can’t? And are you willing to name them and why? CC: Listen, I think that there are folks up there that it’s fairly obvious are not going to have what it takes to be president of the United States. But you know what? They all have to make that decision for themselves, Hugh. Running for president is a particularly personal decision. And they all get to decide for themselves when it’s time to get out and to move on, the same way that I have to make that decision every day to continue the campaign for president, to work hard to try to gain the people’s trust. But I think you’re going to see as these debates go on the people who continue to impress in these debates are the people who have been tested and who are going to be able to stand up and fight the fight on behalf of our party. What I will say is I’ve taken the pledge happily to support and endorse whoever wins our primary. I am very confident it’s going to be me, but if it’s not for some reason, I’ll support the person who gets nominated by our process. HH: Now I’m part of the endless merry-go-round of talking heads that have to somehow discussion Donald Trump and Ben Carson every day and say something that isn’t exactly the same every day. What is going on here? Our two frontrunners could not be more different. One is a man of wealth, the other was born into poverty. One is white and privileged, one is black and had no privilege at all. One is a deeply devout Evangelical, the other is a church attender, but is not quick to cite his favorite verses. One is loud, one is quiet. But they’re both on top of the heap. What is going on in 2015, Governor Christie? CC: Listen, people are very angry with Washington, D.C., and they’re picking right now the two most anti-Washington, D.C. characters they can pick, a businessman from New York and a neurosurgeon. And you know, they’re both fine folks. I like both of them on a personal level. I really do. And I’ve known Donald for a long time, Dr. Carson only recently. But you know, the fact is people are really angry with Washington, they’re angry with our party in Washington, and they want to reflect that anger. I absolutely believe in the end, though, that they’re going to pick the person that can fit two criteria. First and foremost, the person they pick can actually get something done as president of the United States, and secondly, the person who can best prosecute cases against Hillary Clinton to get the presidency. HH: All right, now it wouldn’t be a Hewitt interview if I didn’t talk to you about Defense. You’re one of the few guys who knows about the Ohio replacement submarine. Let me throw the F-35 at you. Yesterday, Canada changed parties. They went from deep red to deep blue, and with it, probably, went the orders for 60-plus F-35s, making the plane even more expensive. Is that a good expenditure of American Defense dollars, Governor Christie? CC: Well, I will tell you this. You know, it seems to me that we need to build the F-35. You know, we have new threats emerging all the time across the world, as you know, Hugh. We’ve got to sustain our technological edge. And you know, I think that it makes sense for us to move forward. I don’t, I look at the way this administration has gone back in terms of our commitment to Defense and used sequester as he’s for it. The fact is this president doesn’t want a strong and robust military. He doesn’t believe America has to play a strong and robust role in the world. I differ. My opinion differs greatly. You’ve seen the very detailed plan that I’ve put out regarding not only military hardware, but military personnel. And I want to continue to be supportive of those efforts. And listen, we’re going to have a lot of debates about what hardware to move forward on. But at least at this point, based upon what I know, Hugh, I would move forward with the F-35. HH: Now if you were president today and Bashar Assad shows up in Moscow as he did to do a grip and grin with Putin, how long would it take you to get to the Rose Garden to condemn the president of Russia for meeting with, and adding honor to, a butcher? CC: Not very long, as long as it would take me to put my jacket on, clear my throat and get out there. And the fact is this is where this president fails. He doesn’t understand the impact of the words of the American president. Gosh, Ronald Reagan understood that so well, that the words of the American president are very important. And not only your actions, but your words are important, too. This president fails both on actions and words. And I would be out there condemning him the same way I would already have set up a no-fly zone and made sure that President Putin understood that this is a no-fly zone for him and his planes as well. HH: All right, let’s switch to domestic politics. First of all, the House Republican caucus has to pick Paul Ryan or not Paul Ryan. The Freedom Caucus has not decided. Jim Jordan will join me a little bit later. What do you think the House Republicans ought to do? CC: Well listen, I think the House Republicans should get to work. As I’ve said before, Hugh, I quite frankly don’t care, I don’t think anybody else cares who the Speaker of the House is, and the reason I don’t is because this Congress has been such an abysmal failure. You know, we gave them the House majority in 2010, we gave them the Senate majority in 2014, and they’ve done absolutely nothing. And so I think what the American people care much more about is not who sits in the chair, but once someone is sitting in the chair, are they going to get anything done? And so I hope they get their act together, because the party and people outside our party in this country are weary of looking at these folks, and the inane game of thrones they’re involved in down there that leads to nothing good for the American people. So you know, I applaud Congressman Ryan for his willingness to step up. I like him, and I consider him a personal friend. But I’ve got no favorites here, because quite frankly, I don’t think it matters. HH: When former Secretary of State Clinton at the end of the Democratic debate was asked who’s your, which enemy are you proudest of, she said Republicans. Were you surprised by that? CC: No, because that’s absolutely what she believes. She believes we’re the enemy. This is the uniting force you want to bring to a divided Washington, D.C? People can say much about Hillary Clinton. Calling her a uniter is never something that they should call her. And quite frankly, it was folly for Barack Obama to make her the nation’s top diplomat, because there’s nothing diplomatic about her. The fact is you need to be strong, but you know, you need to know how to deal with others as well, and that comment is just a consistent theme of hers. She sees other Americans as the enemy. I see our enemies and adversaries being around the world, not inside our country. HH: Any chance that she changes that if she’s president? Or does she get more insulated from the other side, and even more, I hesitate to use the word, because I worked for him and I admire Richard Nixon, but is she Nixonian? CC: I think at this point in her career, she’s not going to change her ways. She is secretive, and she will not change. And she will not open herself up to the other side, because she never has. When she said the other night that we’re her enemy, she meant it. We can take her seriously. I think that should disqualify her as president of the United States. HH: Now let me close on a couple of light things, popular culture. CC: Sure. HH: I began with baseball. The movie Back To The Future is very popular today, because today is the day it was predicted, 25 years ago, that it would happen, and the Cubs are in the World Series, you know, headed to the World Series, etc. What movie have you enjoyed most or influenced you most, Governor Christie? CC: Oh, wow. Well listen, my favorite movie of all time is the Godfather. HH: That’s a good choice. One or two? CC: One. HH: Okay. And number three does not deserve to be called a movie, I assume, in your book? CC: I like Godfather I and II. HH: (laughing) CC: (laughing) HH: And we know about your sports, but what do you do to relax? What’s Chris Christie’s idea of the perfect weekend? CC: The perfect weekend is being at my home in New Jersey with Mary Pat and as many of our children as we can have around us. We have our two that live at home right now, Patrick and Bridget, who are 15 and 12. And this week, we’re lucky enough that Notre Dame is on fall break, and so our daughter, Sarah, is home. She’s a sophomore at Notre Dame. My perfect weekend is sitting around with the family, enjoying each other, watching Patrick play hockey, or Bridget play basketball and then going out to dinner with the family and just enjoying each other’s company. It happens much too rarely when you’re governor, and certainly when you’re running for president. So that’s my idea of the perfect weekend. HH: Okay, and a last question. This just popped up. If you’ve got a kid in college and two more on the way, I put three through without any financial aid. I don’t expect financial aid. I make enough money. But you’re a governor. I know what your salary is. I know you’ve been a public guy your whole life. What do you make of the Democrats’ promising to pay for everyone’s college? And what about the burden of college in America? CC: Well, the burden of college in America is enormous, and we need to put market forces on these prices that colleges are charging now. I have two children in college right now, Hugh, one who’s a senior at Princeton, and one who’s a sophomore at Notre Dame. HH: Oh, God. CC: Yeah, exactly. And you know, the fact is that there’s no market forces on these prices, and I have a plan to help put market forces on the prices, which we could talk about another time when I come on the show. But the idea that anything’s for free is folly. That means we’re going to have 70 or 80% tax rates in this country if everything’s for free. And the people who are working every day, the good hard-working Americans, will get to see less and less of their own money, and have less discretion on how to spend it, because Hillary Clinton and her folks will be spending all their money. The American people are smart enough to know that nothing in this world is for free, including college education. And they don’t want their tax rates to go up to 60, 70 or 80% in order to pay for all the things we heard on that stage the other night were going to be free from her and Bernie Sanders. HH: Well Governor Christie, thanks for joining me. With two kids in college at Notre Dame and Princeton, you’d better get back to work and take a second job if you can. Thanks for joining me. CC: Listen, Hugh, the good thing is I married well. My wife works hard, and she does great. So we have a joint checking account, and I’m a happy guy. HH: That’s terrific. Thank you, Governor, have a great weekend. CC: Thank you, Hugh. End of interview. ]]>
    ...
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Soiled Sinema1
Soiled Reviews



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

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  • Interview with Crispin Glover
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    It comes as a great honor that we at Soiled Sinema bring you this insightful interview with modern day Renaissance man Crispin Glover....
    ...
    (Review Source)

Counter Currents Staff1
Counter Currents Publishing



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

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  • A Profound Waste of Time Avengers: Endgame
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    2,018 words The final installment of the massively profitable Avengers movie franchise, Endgame, offers three hours of superhero soap opera within a coherent, twisting, and surprisingly entertaining plot. Screenwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely remain focused on leading us to a grand climax throughout the story while keeping the edge between wondering what will happen […]
    ...
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VJ Morton1
Right Wing Film Geek



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)
  • 2013 projects
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    One of them is to be less embarrassed about blogging things I might have taken two or three tweets to say (& in fractured syntax, 140-chrcter cmpromises 2 boot), a benefit being that I will thereby be blogging more regularly. The other is to fill in what I consider the 10 Most Truly Embarrassing Gaps […]
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John Nolte1
Daily Wire / Breitbart



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • ‘Joy’ Review: Inspiring, Entertaining Love Letter to American Capitalism
    (”Back to the Future” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    “Joy,” which is based in part on the life of Miracle Mop creator Joy Mangano, is the third film teaming director David O. Russell and his muse, Oscar-winner Jennifer Lawrence. It is also, far and away, their best. As much as I enjoyed “Silver Linings Playbook” ( 2012) and “American Hustle (2013), I have no desire to see either again.  The opposite is true for “Joy,” which succeeds both as a love letter to the endless possibilities one can achieve through American capitalism and a female-empowerment story that manages to make its point without laying down a lecture. Joy Mangano (a terrific Lawrence) is a divorced mother of two eking out a living in Long Island (circa 1990) as a booking clerk for Eastern Airlines. Other than her supportive grandmother (Diane Ladd), Joy somehow manages to survive among and live with an extended family that is equal parts eccentric and jaw-droppingly selfish. Joy’s ex-husband of two years is a going-nowhere lounge singer who lives in her basement. Her divorced mother (Virginia Madsen) is a bedridden near-recluse addicted to a cheesy television soap opera. Her father (Robert DeNiro), the only one who chips in economically, is a needy emotional mess constantly
    ...
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Kyle Smith1
National Review



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