Avengers: Infinity War

Not rated yet!
Director
Joe Russo, Anthony Russo
Runtime
2 h 29 min
Release Date
25 April 2018
Genres
Adventure, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Action
Overview
As the Avengers and their allies have continued to protect the world from threats too large for any one hero to handle, a new danger has emerged from the cosmic shadows: Thanos. A despot of intergalactic infamy, his goal is to collect all six Infinity Stones, artifacts of unimaginable power, and use them to inflict his twisted will on all of reality. Everything the Avengers have fought for has led up to this moment - the fate of Earth and existence itself has never been more uncertain.
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Cranky T-Rex3
The Flyby



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Avengers: Infinity War Makes Me Cranky (No Spoilers)
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  • Avengers: Infinity War Review
    Well here it is folks. Marvel's finally getting Thanos off his ass and putting him to work for perhaps the most ambitious movie of all time.  That's right, it's Avengers: Infinity War.

    Look what can you say about Marvel's movies by now?  Even the total stinkers are at least entertaining enough to get you through a couple hours at the theater, and the ones that are really good, are really, really good.  I guess the only question about Infinity War is "how the hell is this going to live up to all the hype?"

    I just couldn't imagine how you'd put THIS many characters in one movie and not have it turn into a complete debacle.  Plus Marvel's track record for villains is extremely hit or miss.  You're going to spend almost a decade hyping up this one bad guy and he's supposed to deliver?  It all just seemed impossible to pull off.

    And yet, they did it.  Now I have to try and explain how without spoiling the movie for those few of you who haven't managed to see it already.  So, without further ado, here's my non-spoiler review of Infinity War:



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    (Review Source)

John Hanlon3
John Hanlon Reviews



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Review: 'Avengers: Infinity War' Packs a Lot of Fun April 29, 2018 |
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    (Review Source)
  • “Avengers: Infinity War” Review
    Avengers: Infinity War feels like both a beginning and end. The story, as incomplete as it is, marks the first time that the elusive Thanos (Josh Brolin) basks in the Marvel cinematic spotlight. For approximately a decade, the Infinity Stones have played a small but important role in this universe. In this film, Thanos’ quest […]
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  • "Avengers: Infinity War" Review

    War.

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The Federalist Staff10
The Federalist



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • In Super-Sized ‘Avengers: Infinity War,’ More Is Definitely More
    Whatever your jam may be—fantasy, SF, action, horror, comedy, or melodrama—it’s guaranteed to be somewhere in this packed conglomeration.
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    (Review Source)
  • ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Perfectly Captures The Despair That Marks America In 2018
    The Avengers, like us, have good intentions. But they aren't really good. And we don't really believe we are either.
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    (Review Source)
  • The Real Villain in ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Is Overpopulation Panic
    That the film paints Malthusian calculus in such an unflattering light just as a wave of editorials are confessing the unrealized horrors of population panic is one heck of a coincidence.
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    (Review Source)
  • Retro ‘Captain Marvel’ Is Empowering But So-So Superhero Filler
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    'Captain Marvel' provides filler until the larger-scale 'Avengers: Endgame' arrives next month but seems lacking in commitment, ambition, and innovation.
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    (Review Source)
  • Can ‘Unplanned’ Actually Convince Pro-Choicers Abortion Is Wrong?
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    This isn’t your typical cheesy Christian film but, given the message, it's likely to attract a niche audience that already knows the truth about abortion.
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    (Review Source)
  • ‘Avengers: Endgame’ Wraps Up Epic Marvel Storyline With Fateful, Fantastic Finale
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    It's not perfect, but 'Avengers: Endgame' comes close enough that even the most superhero-saturated, seen-it-all fan will love it.
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    (Review Source)
  • ‘Avengers: Endgame’ Makes It Easier To Say Goodbye To An Era
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Ultimately, this is a film not just about massive battles between good and evil, about flashy tech and iron suits, it is a look into the human soul, and what we are willing to do to overcome.
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    (Review Source)
  • What Made ‘Avengers: Endgame’ The Highest-Grossing Movie Of All Time
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    After 11 years of story-building, Marvel finally gave audiences a sense of completeness, showing it's not always the journey but the conclusion that counts.
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    (Review Source)
  • 15 Worst Bombs Among Summer 2018 Movies
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    For this cinema cynic, who glories in the misfires and crater-producing duds, there is not as much wreckage to pick through this year, but there are still ample failures to be found.
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    (Review Source)

John Nolte5
Daily Wire / Breitbart



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Review: Leaves You Wanting More In Good Ways and Bad
    Marvel has certainly delivered better movies than Infinity War. What is more real this time, though, are the stakes. People die. Knowing this is Marvel, we cannot be sure if they die-die.  Nevertheless, Infinity War leaves you in a dark and anxious place. It is going to be a long year.
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    (Review Source)
  • 'Avengers: Infinity War' Review: Leaves You Wanting More In Good Ways and Bad
    Marvel has certainly delivered better movies than Infinity War. What is more real this time, though, are the stakes. People die. Knowing this is Marvel, we cannot be sure if they die-die.  Nevertheless, Infinity War leaves you in a dark and anxious place. It is going to be a long year.
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    (Review Source)
  • Avengers: ‘Infinity War’ Topples ‘Star Wars’ with Record $250M Opening
    A whole lot of superheroes added up to a whole lot of ticket sales. The superhero smorgasbord “Avengers: Infinity Wars” opened with predictable shock-and-awe, earning $250 million in box office over the weekend and edging past “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” to set the highest opening weekend of all-time.
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    (Review Source)
  • 'Ant-Man and the Wasp' Review: Nothing Deep, Just a Solid Action Comedy
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    if you have seen the Ant-Man and the Wasp trailer, you have pretty much seen the best parts of the movie.
    ...
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  • 'Avengers: Endgame' Review: Marvel Sticks the Landing
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Endgame is a true epic, filled with spectacle and purpose. It has something good to say about the world, a real philosophy about the importance of humanity, family, and self-sacrifice.
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    (Review Source)

Steven Crowder3
Louder with Crowder



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • ‘AVENGERS INFINITY WAR’ MOVIE REVIEW: Does It Stand On It’s Own? | Louder With Crowder
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  • AVENGERS INFINITY WAR’ MOVIE REVIEW: Does It Stand On Its Own?
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  • ‘Avengers Endgame’ Gets it Right with Easy Entertainment, No SJW Bullsh*t (Spoiler Free...
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Dave Cullen1
Computing Forever



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Avengers Infinity War Review (Spoilers)
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Ben Davies1
Rebel Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Ben Davies' 2018 Rebel Awards! “Biggest Dumpster Fire” and more lowlights of the year in movies
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Society Reviews7
Society Reviews



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • As a moviegoer, this is the perfect popcorn film for audiences, escapism at it’s finest. As a comic book fan, this is everything you have waited a decade for. As a critic, there are a lot of flaws in the movie.

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  • Mission: Impossible – Fallout Review
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    There haven’t been that many movies this summer that has felt like summer blockbusters. Mission: Impossible – Fallout is the exception for the summer. From the awesome trailer to the sight of Tom Cruise doing even more stunts that only a madman would attempt, the hype behind this film was only matched by Avengers: Infinity War. After watching this film, Ethan Hunt might well be an Avenger and after the events of Infinity War, I think they are a few job openings.

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  • Ant-Man and the Wasp Review
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    If you are still reeling from the ending of Avengers: Infinity War (which has been somewhat tainted considering all the news of future films starring everyone who supposedly died) then you are probably in need of a fun cheesy superhero film and Ant-Man 2 comes just in time.

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  • Digimon Adventure Tri. Chapter 6: Future Review
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    We have arrived at the disappointing destination of the Digimon Adventure Tri Saga, Digimon Adventure Tri. Chapter 6: Future. After five chapters with only one more to go, they are far too many unanswered questions that should have been answered by now. A lot like Avengers: Infinity War, this should be the climax of a saga, not another chapter where we hope that longstanding plot holes are finally addressed. 

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  • Overboard (2018) Review
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    So apparently, you Canucks don’t have access to the great American export of Trash Hollywood Remakes so I’m stepping in this week for a review of Overboard (2018). Believe it or not, there are other movies in theatres not named Avengers: Infinity War. Unfortunately, that doesn’t mean the alternatives are very good.

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  • Black Panther Review
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    Under normal circumstances, you would believe that Black Panther is the next step in the Marvel Cinematic Universe to get us to the Avengers: Infinity Wars in less than 3 months. Well, you would be wrong because Black Panther is the most important superhero movie ever made and it’s exactly the movie we need right now in these times…at least that’s what I’ve been told.

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  • Deadpool 2 Review
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    Deadpool 2 does have plenty of genuine laughs and I can’t say that it’s a bad movie. However, the film doesn’t offer much more than that which is why it’s such a letdown from what the first Deadpool was.

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Plugged In9
Focus on the Family



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

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    It’s beginning to look a lot like … December. And when you’re not out shoveling the drive or trying to coax the dog to get his business done so you can cut short your wind-whipped walk, you might just be wondering what family-friendly movies are streaming this month. So slip on your snowflake jammies and […]

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    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    There are those who say that we live in an infinite number of universes. For some scientists who reject the idea of a Creator, it helps explain the outrageously outlandish improbability that life exists at all; and many a science-fiction and comic book writer has leveraged the theory to create wildly creative twists on well-worn […]

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    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

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    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    In Avengers: Endgame, Thanos refers to himself and his dastardly actions as an “inevitability.” But he could’ve been describing the financial fate of the film itself. It seemed indeed inevitable that Endgame would finish the weekend No. 1. The real question was by how much. Could it earn more than the $257.7 million its forebear, […]

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    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    As you’ve probably heard by now, Stan Lee died yesterday at the age of 95. Many have eulogized Lee as a “comics legend,” and that’s wholly fair. As a writer, editor, publisher and eventually chairman of Marvel Comics, he created or co-created some of the world’s most famous superheroes and helped redefine the genre itself. […]

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    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    Nostalgia is big business. If it’s been a hit in the last century, whether on the big screen or small, someone in Hollywood is figuring out a way to reboot, repackage or relaunch it. That’s because familiar entertainment properties from the past pack built-in marketing muscle, full of yesteryear’s fond memories. Disney, of course, has […]

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    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    See ya, 2018. Wouldn’t want to be ya. Who would? The year was so crazy that even Vincent Van Gogh would have suggested it get a hold of itself. Terrible fires in California. Terrible cold out east. A Tesla Roadster is driving around in space. Certain eels are compulsively swimming into the noses of certain […]

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    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    It’s that time of year. The time when some of us build our weekend schedules around football games, both college and pro. Bowl games. Championhips. Wild Card showdowns and Divisional Rounds. And soon … the Super Bowl. For some of us, we can’t remember a time when we didn’t know what a fist down was, […]

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    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
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Counter Currents Staff6
Counter Currents Publishing



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

⚠️ EDGY 🔥 CONTENT 🔥 WARNING 🔥 (NSFW?) ⚠️

🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻


  • Avengers: Infinity War

    [1]1,244 words

    Infinity War is a “gargantuan” film that has surpassed being a mere movie and become a cinema “event.” It is the latest in the trilogy of Avengers movies, and apparently nineteenth in Marvel’s “Cinematic Universe.” Having seen only Iron Man and Guardians of the Galaxy 2, I watched this fanboy-specific orgasmatron with unbiased eyes and little clue what was happening. It’s big, it’s gnarly, it has Thor, the Hulk, and all your favorite (or not so favorite) characters, but is it any good? 

    Yes and no. It gets off to a difficult start, with the sheer volume of explosions and hand-to-hand combat making the plot impossible to follow. Newcomers to the franchise will be completely lost as cyborgs (Tony Stark’s Iron Man, and a robotic crusader named Vision) confront aliens with an array of pointy sticks, Benedict Cumberbatch is a wizard and uses magical powers to stop dust storms, and so on. The film chops between constant action and ‘witty’ dialogue as various super-dupes try to out banter each other, all the while bickering about the best way to prevent the coming apocalypse and obligatory end-of-the-universe (it’s always the universe, and never anywhere more local, to make it a diverse and globally appealing cataclysm). The sharp comebacks and humor fall flat, as the tone of the exposition is just so morose.

    The film trundles through its first hour managing to be both a constant barrage of action and yet intensely dreary, and this is just the set up for the remaining two. There’s little to relate to on-screen and no normality to anchor the Avengers as “super” or even “heroes.” They’re already established as the good guys, so precious little screen time (actually, none at all) is devoted to the people of earth they are in the business of saving. Bruce Banner even has a Hulk Impotency problem after getting beaten up by an alien (I suppose one of the writers thought this was funny).

    The villain Thanos, it is explained, has a gauntlet forged by space dwarves that is powered by magical MacGuffins from the dawn of the universe. If he gets all the MacGuffins, then he will be able to wipe out half of every species, based on some crude Malthusian logic. The Avengers (and the Guardians of the Galaxy, who are along for the ride to broaden appeal) have to stop him. It’s not an especially deep plot, but it has the merit of making sense, and in this sprawling, cosmos-trotting adventure, things that make simple sense are good to hold onto as the abundance of stuff happening devolves into a tangled mess.

    The movie gives way to Keep it Simple Stupid tactics by having a character tell the audience which planet they are going to, then showing them the planet in a panning landscape shot, and then telling them the name of the planet again in giant serif letters. If I were a struggling language student, I would be glad of Avengers screenwriters helping me learn the solar system. Should the film have kept its original, gloomy tone of imminent doom it would be nearly unbearable, but luckily Chris Pratt and the Guardians lighten the mood, and the Avengers and assorted Good Guys begin to blend as a jibey team the viewer can relate to and root for.

    Every cynical element of the films construction is lampshaded: Spider-Man asks Iron Man if he ever saw an “old science fiction movie called Alien?” — a much better, more tightly scripted and cohesive movie, with a definite beginning, middle, and end. Avengers: Infinity War has a beginning that (as far as I can discern) started several films ago, and an end that is set in a future film. What viewers are paying to see is a particularly explodey segment of a long-running scifi cartoon serial, a sort of season premiere, if you will. It marks the final convergence of the Marvel Cinematic Universe into a gloopy, miscgenated mess with the DNA of several different franchises being twisted together into an undifferentiated mishmash. With it comes the diminishment of any kind of depth or substance. The most well-trod character is Thanos, the villain, by necessity and virtue of having the most screen time; everyone else is present to either punch aliens (Hulk, Thor, Iron Man, Black Panther), punch Thanos (Spider-Man, Star Lord, Iron Man again), or provide a MacGuffin to move the plot from Backdrop A to Backdrop B (Gamora, Vision, Dr. Strange).

    The standout comedy comes from the Guardians of the Galaxy and Thor, with Rocket, Star Lord, and a serious space dwarf playing the foil to the goofs of Thor, Drax, and Mantis, Tony Stark’s banter and the more strait-laced heroes take a back seat as the more cartoonish Guardians come to the fore. The humor shifts from aggressive barbs to the comedy of the brave and mistaken, with Thor inquiring “Will I die?” after being told such and such will kill him, and Mantis exclaiming that they are there to “Chew ass and kick names.”

    The film’s emotional pivot is an abduction/adoption father/daughter relationship between Gamora and Thanos, whereby throwing her down a well he proves himself truly a nasty piece of work, and the anticipated casualties start to stack up, giving all the CGI explosions some gravitas. Thanos’s motivations are so incredibly vulgar and unsubtle that it’s almost plebian, and the film seems to be looking down its nose at anyone who has Linkola-type concerns about the sustainability of global capitalism and unchecked population growth. He talks at length about having the Will to Do Something, and it’s all very Ubermenschy; only unlike the Joker’s Ubermenschery of seeking to awaken Gothamites to the superficiality of their virtue, Thanos’s Ubermenschery is about punching enough people in the face to undo resource scarcity.

    In the final showdown the slate is wiped clean in an incredibly drastic and radical mass-hero die-off.  After nearly three hours of constant punching and explosions, the deaths of characters that have survived the preceding 19 films is a shock only in its audacity; they simply dissolve into thin air with little drama (aside from the already-memed “Mr. Stark, I don’t feel so good” from the innocent Spidey). All that talk about resurrection earlier on in the movie suddenly begins to make sense. The only questions are whether fans will buy this cynical ploy and pay for the next release to see whether their favored characters make it, and whether Marvels’ writers will be able to rewind time without it being painfully contrived and predictable.

    No-one in this movie is a real role model, even though plenty of them are likable, and the settings and scenarios border on the absurd. The final conflict has Wakandans — yes, there is a monumental battle set in the rolling hills of Wakanda — facing off against four-armed aliens with lots of teeth, whilst Iron-Man’s buddy flies around dropping American napalm and showing off his United States military insignia, because the USA is Awesome and Israel’s enemies are monsters. But by the end of it, I was enjoying it for the spectacle; a big, stupid, overpriced assortment of CGI set pieces and manufactured conflicts, inhabited by lost but well-meaning characters. Even the villain means well and gets somewhere, despite being the most hated man in the cosmos; and if we have the Will to Do Something then we’ll get somewhere too, no matter how many antifa comic book fans want to punch us in the face.

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    (Review Source)
  • The Counter-Currents/North American New Right Newsletter is Back!
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    [1]

    Made in the shade

    1,762 words

    Dear Friends of Counter-Currents,

    After a long hiatus, I decided to revive our newsletter. It was just not fair to our authors and reader not to share our Top 20 lists and web stats. This edition covers December 2017 to July 2018, focusing just on traffic stats and our top articles. I want to thank all of our writers, readers, and donors for making Counter-Currents such a success.

    1. Our Readership and Web Traffic 

    Month Unique Visitors Number of Visits Pages Viewed “Hits” Bandwidth
    July 2018 151,710 287,323 1,495,087 1,541,056 43.60 GB
    June 2018 150,307 280,625 1,420,234 1,371,897 38.62 GB
    May 2018 151,739 287,032 3,990,878 4,140,772 38.36 GB
    April 2018 150,833 286,365 1,535,115 1,676,785 37.94 GB
    March 2018 169,686 327,589 2,589,786 2,733,787 54.08 GB
    February 2018 145,761 268,300 1,370,626 1,511,087 32.71 GB
    January 2018 150,378 297,511 1,575,368 1,715,849 37.82 GB
    December 2017 152,616 279,822 1,611,341 1,721,470 36.28  GB
    November 2017 206,887 369,476 1,447,593 1,558,599 34.12 GB
    October 2017 185,568 357,742 1,305,421 2,674,026 84.44 GB
    September 2017 167,887 316,974 1,174,706 5,018,519 59.75 GB
    August 2017 197,961 402,333 1,571,545 5,147,275 72.50 GB
    July 2017 143,298 291,003 962,966 4,321,260 54.73 GB
    June 2017 146,466 314,232 991,487 4,496,358 56.48 GB
    May 2017 144,005 316,576 975,281 4,304,712 56.36 GB
    April 2017 146,149 314,996 1,141,489 4,307,589 63.78 GB
    March 2017 187,296 372,483 1,247,545 4,226,147 67.70 GB
    February 2017 176,470 349,663 1,203,798 4,112,379 63.50 GB
    January 2017 168,633 354,483 1,274,174 4,538,574 70.39 GB
    December 2016 166,356 343,155 1,237,884 4,459,628 70.60 GB
    November 2016 149,973 327,184 1,211,464 4,578,555 54.19 GB
    October 2016 143,274 334,172 1,384,218 4,686,132 49.46 GB
    September 2016 135,699 329,894 1,523,606 4,773,361 60.16 GB
    August 2016 140,362 316,443 1,505,438 4,334,119 71.48 GB
    July 2016 122,622 343,826 1,756,815 4,071,905 58.92 GB
    June 2016 123,901 351,467 1,664,032 4,237,552 57.88 GB
    May 2016 134,345 360,069 1,663,686 4,578,071 59.79 GB
    April 2016 121,779 327,150 1,514,605 4,525,313 59.50 GB
    March 2016 119,288 343,090 1,586,158 4,385,429 55.58 GB
    February 2016 121,361 342,891 1,269,478 3,865,233 52.09 GB
    January 2016 112,680 312,399 1,279,265 3,808,315 56.32 GB
    December 2015 118,438 327,974 1,270,504 3,756,303 59.09 GB
    November 2015 130,264 341,885 1,212,556 3,825,700 62.43 GB
    October 2015 118,247 320,680 1,226,301 3,599,419 62.65 GB
    September 2015 124,342 325,517 1,266,197 3,653,818 65.50 GB
    August 2015 103,769 264,613 1,082,267 2,992,773 52.13 GB
    July 2015 103,188 281,469 1,263,504 3,307,479 55.38 GB
    June 2015 119,264 288,620 1,289,808 3,439,675 57.42 GB
    May 2015  no data  no data  no data  no data  no data
    April 2015 79,251 144,783 666,989 1,576,493 14.12 GB
    March 2015 86,251 173,236 749,068 1,545,146 14.21 GB
    February 2015 76,322 148,894 526,666 1,208,728 10.92 GB
    January 2015 86,263 171,544 612,211 1,348,105 13.35 GB
    December 2014 78,658 152,838 538,903 896,560 9.73 GB
    November 2014 86,254 172,786 678,026 741,633 7.93 GB
    October 2014 85,852 174,240 678,119 748,061 8.15 GB
    September 2014 61,485 121,651 448,701 505,472 8.92 GB
    August 2014 62,415 127,630 438,270 501,703 8.62 GB
    July 2014 63,223 149,786 456,117 536,178 8.79 GB
    June 2014 58,147 116,084 327,309 366,568 7.16 GB
    May 2014 59,321 116,293 321,397 363,432 7.08 GB
    April 2014 56,511 110,621 318,831 367,018 6.91 GB
    March 2014 65,619 117,881 335,592 380,785 7.89 GB
    February 2014 55,805 100,271 300,207 346,026 6.18 GB
    January 2014 82,567 209,131 1,130,149 1,224,623 98.64 GB
    July 2013 82,106 200,961 1,619,899 1,813,531 124.29 GB
    June 2013 80,409 197,258 1,730,633 1,884,016 103.77 GB
    May 2013 95,667 221,260 1,758,299 1,897,099 103.67 GB
    April 2013 81,328 192,910 1,528,169 1,634,540 91.16 GB
    March 2013 83,303 189,545 1,477,001 1,778,006 94.98 GB
    February 2013 81,999 185,688 1,396,374 1,498,502 75.33 GB
    January 2013 100,054 208,004 900,577 1,012,979 40.81 GB
    December 2012 109,265 224,793 926,117 1,143,248 37.53 GB
    November 2012 107,956 199,912 584,115 755,419 29.95 GB
    October 2012 81,739 157,152 410,096 416,362 16.36 GB
    September 2012 66,719 132,503 455,938 493,856 17.73 GB
    August 2012 41,616 96,314 305,729 329,353 12.23 GB
    July 2012 52,304 108,340 367,589 373,470 12.52 GB
    June 2012 55,112 110,246 400,141 404,162 13.66 GB
    May 2012 56,323 111,533 400,243 404,483 15.70 GB
    April 2012 56,772 110,029 421,446 428,678 16.08 GB
    March 2012 55,572 106,029 441,170 475,719 16.36 GB
    February 2012 53,345 99,607 376,288 411,915 14.43 GB
    January 2012 56,633 107,644 408,373 433,736 21.38 GB
    December 2011 49,845 97,223 337,881 344,210 13.65 GB
    November 2011 44,445 88,824 330,664 339,521 14.22 GB
    October 2011 45,590 90,444 337,137 468,197 17.78 GB
    September 2011 45,427 88,782 422,902 481,909 11.67 GB
    August 2011 40,002 81,012 502,282 2,083,593 53.18 GB
    July 2011 30,186 66,093 416,309 1,952,047 71.23 GB
    June 2011 28,629 57,920 264,928 1,004,128 22.78 GB
    May 2011 36,596 78,103 274,841 1,334,472 47.59 GB
    April 2011 20,091 58,037 223,291 2,729,449 54.65 GB
    March 2011 29,768 62,077 220,053 2,485,001 52.21 GB
    February 2011 29,737 61,519 213,121 2,081,558 40.13 GB
    January 2011 28,583 60,005 198,249 1,736,067 34.06 GB
    December 2010 26,161 50,975 192,905 1,101,829 27.79 GB
    November 2010 26,054 48,336 171,833 915,553 26.39 GB
    October 2010 17,848 35,921 140,365 611,367 17.93 GB
    September 2010 17,063 34,510 147,051 580,550 16.39 GB
    August 2010 12,174 22,348 93,379 333,614 10.17 GB
    July 2010 9,387 17,329 119,254 348,172 10.01 GB
    June 2010 6,145 10,328 70,732 200,824 6.08 GB

     

    2.  Top 20 Pieces (with Number of Reads), December 2017 to July 2018

    July:

    1. C. B. Robertson, “The Coming Civil War,” 6,681
    2. Greg Johnson, “Dov Bechhofer Did Nothing Wrong,” 6,631
    3. R. Houck, “Eric Clopper’s Sex and Circumcision,” 5,727
    4. Quintilian, “Events Have Been Set in Motion,” 5,175
    5. Ash Donaldson, “Sword of Dishonor,” 4,297
    6. Greg Johnson, “Whiteness,” 4,250
    7. Collin Cleary, “How to Know if You Have Had a Mystical Experience,” 4,188
    8. James Lawrence, “The Kursk Strategy,” 4,025
    9. Spencer Quinn, “An Open Letter to Vox Day,” 3,929
    10. Greg Johnson, “What’s Wrong with Diversity?,” 3,763
    11. Chad Crowley, “White Lives Matter,” 3,503
    12. Donald Thoresen, “The Re-Emergence of Honesty,” 3,476
    13. Chad Crowley, “Towards a New European Palingenesis,” 3,476
    14. Jef Costello, “I Will Not Become My Father,” 3,351
    15. Greg Johnson, “A Lost Interview,” 3,345
    16. James J. O’Meara, “Duper’s Delight or Draper’s Diddle?,” 3,244
    17. Jef Costello, “Has the Left Gone Completely Crazy?,” 3,211
    18. R. Houck, “The War Against Whites in Advertising,” 3,125
    19. Travis LeBlanc, Interview with Ryan Faulk, 3,060
    20. Michael Walker, “Mussolini, Or the Will to Power,” 2,967

    June:

    1. R. Houck, “The War Against Whites in Advertising,” 8,206
    2. C. B. Robertson, “Identity and the Problem with Christianity,” 5,557
    3. Huntley Haverstock, “The Truth About Tommy Robinson,” 5,433
    4. Guillaume Durocher, “The Truth About the Kalergi Plan,” 4,006
    5. Huntley Haverstock, “The Latest Lies from Tommy Robinson,” 3,762
    6. Huntley Haverstock, “On Black Pills and Punching Right,” 3,490
    7. Margot Metroland, “Lord Haw Haw of MI5,” 3,157
    8. Greg Johnson, “Why I Don’t Support Tommy Robinson,” 3,126
    9. Counter-Currents Radio, “The Populist Wave in Europe,” 3,048
    10. Huntley Haverstock, “Mexicans and Motherhood,” 2,980
    11. P. J. Collins, “Hello (((Fellow Boomers))),” 2,973
    12. Huntley Haverstock, “Further Proof Tommy Robinson is a Fraud,” 2,871
    13. Chad Crowley, “Racial Realities,” 2,838
    14. Rainer Chlodwig von K, “Dark Star Risible,” 2,769
    15. Julius Evola, “The Aryan Ethos,” 2,760
    16. R. Houck, “Law Enforcement and the Hostile Elite,” 2,729
    17. A. B. Rockwell, “The Handmaid’s Tale,” 2,638
    18. James Lawrence, “Thoughts on the State of the Right,” 2,608
    19. Hubert Collins, “Liberalism is Suicide, Suicide is Liberalism,” 2,339
    20. Morris V. de Kamp, “Punching Left,” 2,330

    May:

    1. Buttercup Dew reviews Avengers: Infinity War11,132
    2. Greg Johnson, “Why I Don’t Support Tommy Robinson,” 10,921
    3. Collin Cleary, “Evola’s Nietzschean Ethics,” 6,159
    4. Karl Nemmersdorf, “Racial Mayhem,” 4,931
    5. Greg Johnson, “Counter-Currents Under Attack,” 4,614
    6. Travis LeBlanc, “Bill Cosby: America’s Uncle (Tom),” 4,025
    7. Jarosław Ostrogniew, “Across the Line: Why Nationalism Can Win,” 3,557
    8. John Morgan, “In South Carolina, Criticizing Jews and Israel is Now Hate Speech,” 3,235
    9. Rolf Peter Sieferle, “The Eternal Nazi,” 3,231
    10. Trevor Lynch reviews Solo: A Star Wars Story2,926
    11. Samuel Francis, “Enemies of the State,” 2,890
    12. Spencer Quinn, “On the Kevin MacDonald-Nathan Cofnas Debate,” Part 1, 2,810
    13. David Yorkshire, “Hero Worship and Tommytards,” 2,809
    14. John Morgan, “What Would Evola Do?,” 2,748
    15. Travis LeBlanc interviews Frame Game, 2,589
    16. Voryn Illidari, Cobra Kai2,586
    17. F. Roger Devlin, “Rolf Peter Sieferle,” 2,560
    18. David Yorkshire, “Two Independent Films for the Dissident Right,” 2,455
    19. Samantha Hilton, “American Renaissance, 2018,” 2,392
    20. Margot Metroland, “The Gospel According to Goldberg,” 2,389

    April:

    1. R. Houck, “The War on Whites in Advertising: A Followup,” 8,439
    2. M. K. Lane, “Who’s Afraid of Afrikaner Refugees,” 8,220
    3. R. Houck, “The War on Whites in Advertising,” 5,703
    4. Travis LeBlanc, “Baked Alaska Goes Hollywood,” 4,238
    5. Greg Johnson, “The European Fighting Spirit,” 4,093
    6. Spencer Quinn, “On the Doxxing of Ricky Vaughan,” 4,080
    7. Hubert Collins, “Use Hate Speech: It Makes You Powerful,” 3,868
    8. Michael Walker, “Europe’s Dams Are Cracking,” 3,576
    9. Travis LeBlanc, “The Great Sex-Worker Shuttening,” 3,519
    10. Greg Johnson, “Ronald Beiner’s Dangerous Minds,” 3,486
    11. F. Roger Devlin, “Toward the New Mainstream,” 3,311
    12. Jef Costello, “They’re Coming,” 3,105
    13. C. B. Robertson, “The Sin of Pride,” 3,095
    14. A. B. Rockwell, “To Kill a Nice White Society,” 3,035
    15. Greg Johnson, “Camille Paglia Censors Her Own Work,” 3,035
    16. Greg Johnson, “Dealing with Doxers,” 3,028
    17. Greg Johnson, “What’s Wrong With Diversity” (podcast), 2,863
    18. Bane Jacobs, “Retaking the City,” 2,774
    19. John Morgan, “For Europe: Hungary’s 2018 Election,” 2,735
    20. Greg Johnson, “Redefining the Mainstream,” 2,725

    March:

    1. R. Houck, “The War Against Whites in Advertising,” 35,962
    2. Greg Johnson, “In Bed With the Press,” 6,052
    3. Ricardo Duchesne, “Steven Pinker’s Anti-Enlightenment Attack on White Identitarians,” 5,450
    4. Greg Johnson, “What Is American Nationalism?,” 4,056
    5. Jef Costello, “In Praise of Jared Taylor,” 3,956
    6. Modeste Schwartz, “From the Savannah to Helsinki,” 3,544
    7. Me Ne Frego, Interview with Mike Enoch, 3,517
    8. Greg Johnson, “Rules for Writers,” Part 1, 3,431
    9. Spencer Quinn, “Skin in the Game: The Doxxing of Pamela Geller,” 3,367
    10. Spencer Quinn, “A Low-IQ Individual,” 3,252
    11. Julius Evola, “Otto Weininger on the Jewish Question,” 3,148
    12. Alain de Benoist, “On French Politics, Populism, Trump, Hungary, and Being a Right-Wing Intellectual,” 3,081
    13. Spencer Quinn, “Letter to the Z-Man,” 3,060
    14. Julian Langness, “Identity Rising,” 3,041
    15. Greg Johnson, “Rules for Writers,” Part 2, 2,854
    16. Greg Johnson, “Journalists and Other Antifa,” 2,853
    17. Travis LeBlanc, “O. J. Simpson and the Red Pill that America Forgot,” 2,774
    18. Doug Huntington, “Is Russia Really Our Friend?,” 2,768
    19. Counter-Currents Radio, “James Allsup on American Nationalism,” 2,702
    20. Spencer Quinn, “Paul Nehlen’s Wage the Battle,” 2,680

    February:

    1. Travis LeBlanc, “Internet Bloodsports,” 7,750
    2. Video of the Day: “German Women Denounce Migrant Violence,” 4,494
    3. Donald Thoresen, “Dear Angry Young White Man,” 4,412
    4. Dionýz Sokol, “The Ideological War for the Occult Scene,” 4,358
    5. Ricardo Duchesne, “Jordan Peterson’s Rejection of Identity Politics Allows White Ethnocide,” 4,025
    6. G, “Overton Window Warriors,” 3,976
    7. Morris V. De Kamp, “Warning: All Military Careers are Swiftboatable,” 3,756
    8. James J. O’Meara, “From Barbados to Black Panther,” 3,705
    9. Jef Costello, “All Hail the God Emperor’s State of the Universe Address,” 3,469
    10. C. B. Robertson, “Creating a Place to Be,” 3,360
    11. Greg Johnson, “Politics, Metapolitics, and Hegemony,” 3,347
    12. Counter-Currents Radio, Interview with the Golden One, 3,335
    13. Spencer Quinn, “Paul Nehlen, the JG, and the GOP,” 3,266
    14. Anglian Exile, “Spielberg’s War: Saving Private Ryan and the Jewish Experience,” 3,238
    15. Kerry Bolton, “New Zealand Race Commissar Incites Violence Against Rightist Dissidents,” 3,198
    16. Hubert Collins, “Put Pornographer Jim Powers in Prison,” 3,170
    17. Jef Costello, “Wardruna in New York,” 3,131
    18. Trevor Lynch, Black Panther3,122
    19. Black Invention Myths, 3,118
    20. Aedon Cassiel, “Black Lives Matter is a KKK Plot,” 3,107

    January:

    1. Jef Costello, “Why We Are So Good-Looking,” 6,434
    2. Jarosław Ostrogniew, “The Dark Rebirth:Report on the Asgardsrei 2017 Festival & Pact of Steel Conference (Kiev, Ukraine, 16–17.12.2017),” 4,759
    3. Spencer Quinn, “The Truth About Martin Luther King, Jr.,” 4,186
    4. Jef Costello, “Vikings: The TV Series,” 3,946
    5. Greg Johnson, “Answering Sargon of Akkad” (podcast), 3,879
    6. Greg Johnson, “Forced to be Free,” 3,689
    7. Travis LeBlanc, “The Skeptic War,” 3,683
    8. Me Ne Frego, “Greg Johnson on Sargon, Nehlen, and Bannon,” 3,582
    9. Julius Evola, “Judaism in the Ancient World,” 3,567
    10. Greg Johnson vs. Styx Hexenhammer 666, 3,497
    11. Greg Johnson, “The Christian Question in White Nationalism,” 3,295
    12. Travis LeBlanc, “An Identitarian, a Civic Nationalist, & a Classical Liberal Walk into a Stream (the Third One Cucks),” 3,268
    13. C. B. Robertson, “A Mythology for the New Right,” 3,171
    14. Spencer Quinn reviews Jared Taylor’s If We Do Nothing3,162
    15. Spencer Quinn, “Déjà Jew: Jared Taylor & the “Alt Right Purge” on Twitter,” 3,121
    16. C. B. Robertson, “What is Racism?,” 3,043
    17. Greg Johnson, “Whitopia,” 2,932
    18. Huntley Haverstock, “Why the State: A Response to Styx,” 2,922
    19. Spencer Quinn, “Paul Nehlen: /ourguy/,” 2,911
    20. Aedon Cassiel, “Ten Questions for Jason Kessler,” 2,654

    December 2017:

    1. Greg Johnson, “Don’t Let the Bastards Get You Down,” 12,022
    2. Irmin Vinson, “Lauren Southern the Sex Worker,” 6,216
    3. Spencer Quinn, “This Is Why We Have Anti-Semitism,” 5,453
    4. Jef Costello, “I Am Officially Done With These People,” 5,120
    5. Spencer Quinn, “On Misogyny in the Alt Right,” 4,919
    6. Aedon Cassiel, “The Inevitability of Ethnonationalism,” 4,646
    7. Trevor Lynch reviews Star Wars: The Last Jedi, 4,514
    8. Aedon Cassiel, “Bring Back Prohibition,” 4,243
    9. Garrett Deasy, “Patriotism and Nationalism: A Response to Sarah Silverman,” 4,021
    10. Me Ne Frego on The Front National, 3,798
    11. Spencer Quinn, “‘I’m Not Racist,'” 3,716
    12. Joseph S. Salemi, “The Soros-Bergoglio Axis,” 3,643
    13. Philosophicat, “Hit Me With Your Best Shot,” 3,321
    14. Gregory Hood, “The Great Alabama Shit Test,” 3,315
    15. Spencer Quinn, “The Spirit of Poland,” 3,293
    16. Claus Brinker, “Greta Gerwig’s Lady Bird,” 3,289
    17. Quintilian, “Wyndham Lewis’ Paleface: The Philosophy of the Melting-Pot,” 3,260
    18. Howe Abbott-Hiss, “J. K. Rowling and Her Fans Still Have Traditional White Views,” 3,229
    19. “Be of Good Cheer”: Counter-Currents on Millenniyule, 2,974
    20. Buttercup Dew reviews Star Wars: The Last Jedi2,970

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    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Vader: A Star Wars Story
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    2,754 words
    [1]

    Even as New Star Wars steps into the past of its original characters, it steps further from what originally defined it. Luke, Han, and Leia are dead, with Luke suffering further injury by being shown as an attempted child-murderer. Yoda, Obi-Wan, and other Jedi are puff-piece, blue-glow cameos. With the ascension of Kylo Ren, an emotionally conflicted, emo manchild to the Emperor’s throne of the pseudo-knightly Space Nazi First Order, the integral otherness of the Empire has crumbled. Ren and Rey spent The Last Jedi in cahoots against both Snokey-Doke[1] [2] and Luke respectively, and neither of them have any real ambition or vision save for what lines are put in their mouths for the sake of advancing the plot and replicating the earlier, more substantial Star Wars films.

    Solo looks to further the cinematic distance between the original black-and-white moral formula of Star Wars by capitalizing on Han Solo as the leader of a criminal enterprise—a smuggler—and if the trailer is any indication, Alden Ehrenreich is being set up to be a Quill-Alike, and the film itself a Guardians of the Galaxy-esque space adventure with amoral parties being co-opted into a good cause. It is, of course, set back when the Empire had an Emperor fitting of the title, so one wonders whether audiences will be exposed to another noxious computer-graphics reanimation of Empire baddies, Grand Moff Tarkin-style, to give him a good cause to eventually embrace. Should the film choose to tread this path, it may struggle—Han Solo was always an accessory to Luke as the emotional focal point and narrative driver of the Star Wars story, and prior to his enlistment in the Rebellion was essentially an unknown quantity. Young Harrison Ford and Chris Pratt share the rugged charm and puppy eyes to be a successful leading man by way of being empathetic,[2] [3] but the harder-faced Ehrenreich doesn’t quite have the physiognomy for it; I have a suspicion that Solo, like Rogue One and Infinity War, will prove to be ultimately uninteresting, cynical, and lacking in characters in which to be emotionally invested.

    Snoke, whilst insubstantial, was still unambigiously a nasty character. With the axis of evil around which the Rebels revolved being snuffed out, is there room for the Rebellion in New Star Wars films to be anything other than contrived and morally vacuous?  Rogue One: Whatever jettisoned the morality of the Rebel cause by casting the Rebels as amoral, self-interested cutthroats in a guerrilla war, and The Last Jedi has undermined the validity of the Rebellion (Resistance, whatever, I don’t care) even further by placing someone essentially normal at the Empire’s center. Gone are the pleas to let the hatred flow through you. Gone are the days of cyborg mercenaries, summoning demonic forces normal men could not hope to fathom. Gone are the megalomaniacal dreams of a galaxy brought to order, held together by a fist in a black leather glove. Kylo Ren’s apologia to Ma-Rey Sue had him laying his white-knight feelings on thick in an attempt to woo her down the First Order aisle. The whole “restoring order to the galaxy” thing was a fabricated afterthought to impressing upon the audience just how gosh-darned special Rey is, dammit, and how anything Ren can do, Rey can do better. When rejected, he doesn’t even try to execute her.

    In the grand Star Wars scheme of things, Kylo Ren is a weak, uninteresting character that evokes nothing of the liberal-religious phobia of Nazism that the original Star Wars creators (not necessarily Lucas) capitalized upon to bring gravitas and urgency to Luke’s struggle. Kylo shares none of those attributes of Palpatine and Vader which made the original Star Wars a compelling post-war narrative and a pseudo-religious tenet of liberal society. He doesn’t even have a vaguely Middle Eastern-looking set of alien henchmen to connect the fear of Nazism with the fear of terrorism and endless trade wars. With him in charge, the First Order is just a rabble. The fear that cemented the Empire is the fear of the unknown, and fear that freedom’s enemies were stronger and possessed of more powerful knowledge than the West. Few characters incarnate these mystic energies, and besides Adolf Hitler, the most well-known is the iconic movie villain, jackboot cyborg, and esoteric Evola-fan: Darth Vader.

    The Star Wars prequels, whilst rightly considered tacky, cynical, and a naked cash-grab which has since been outdone in naked, cash-grabbing cynicism by Diversity Awakens and Rogue One, can now be re-examined for critical faults. Solo is of course an attempt to strain a few more pails out of an already abused and battered cash cow. Seeing as Disney is willing to jump through time as well as hyperspace in the Millennial Falcon to squeeze out what is presumably going to be a one-film origin story, it raises the question of what would have been necessary to dispense with and improvise in order to make the prequels what they truly ought to have been: a one-film origin story for Vader.

    Compared to the total dispensation or subterfuge of primordial, heroic archetypes in Diversity Awakens and The Last Jedi (an African lead who ditches the multiracial alliance to get a parking fine, and an elderly Luke underhandedly using illusion and deception against his former apprentice), the prequels at least retained some elements of the original Star Wars to remain compelling—the mentor/apprentice pair of Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan ending in a funeral pyre, the voodoo facepaint otherness of Darth Maul, and a young Anakin struggling with brutal loss and despair after his mother’s death. All of this is again jettisoned in favor of cringingly stale one-liners, enforced multiracialism, and trite tropes about galactic social justice by New Star Wars, leaving fans at least with the feeling that Lucas tried to do something original in the prequels, even if it was in service of selling tacky plastic toys.

    Nonetheless, they represent a failure of the liberal imagination. Having conjured up an avatar for dark forces beyond his comprehension, Lucas failed to translate this into an effective coming-of-age story and muddied the waters with ’90s merchandising and convoluted filler about trade wars, underwater space creatures, and stamped-out clones, all of which corroded the integrity of the Empire as an emotional counterweight to Rebel heroism. Whereas the Empire was characterized by the individual strength and brutality of Vader, the Emperor, and mass-death-for-mass-death’s sake, the Clone Wars and trade federation squabbles impressed upon the viewer the idea that the armies dying on screen were mass-manufactured.

    Vader, first introduced in A New Hope striding past slaughtered Rebel troops and trying to choke a confession out of a lying non-com, immediately is imbued with gravitas and quality, unlike the battles of the prequels predicated on the quantity of droids, Jedi, and so on. No surprise that prequel fan-favorite is Jango Fett, a bounty hunter struggling against the odds working as a dogeared mercenary, another character struggling against a tide of conflict originating far beyond himself.

    Boba Fett is shown clutching his father’s severed head in a scene of astonishing excess in what is meant to be a family-friendly movie (remember that this type of material is absent from the original films), raising the question that if Lucas is to go to such lengths for the sake of a subplot, why couldn’t Vader be in Boba’s place? Are we denied even a simple beheading as a narrative force to drive Anakin to hate the Jedi?

    The prequels set up Vader as an emotionally-stunted manchild who cannot accept that bad things happen as the world we know and endure tests us, and slavishly devoted to the Emperor Palpatine because, well, just because. Emotionally tortured, computer-graphics assisted Anakin with blazing red eyes yelling that he “hates” is the complete opposite of the Vader that choked, schemed, and doggedly pursued Luke through The Empire Strikes Back. Force-prophecies aside, Vader takes a direct part in the action from his introduction as a leading officer (“Commander, tear apart this ship!”) and a direct role in people-management and the details of invasion; choking Admiral Ozzel to death is a superbly voice-acted, timeless scene, with Vader’s vocals nearly quivering with anger and barely contained malice. What in the galaxy could fuel such single-minded dedication? Vader shoulders his responsibilities fully and fitfully, taking an active part in the conflict against the forces of Rebel decay. Anakin was a victim of circumstance, buffeted around by events and prophecies beyond his control.

    The pivotal scene that defined Vader in the minds of the many in contradistinction to Luke, the Jedi, and the forces of Good is, of course, “No, I am your father.” Luke, still young and fresh from Force training, is idealistic and on a heroic quest, taken in by ideas of high-mindedness, nobility, lofty ideals, and fixed ideas placed above the self, and foolishly allows his enthusiasm to drive him to attempted suicide. Is there anything noble in this scene, really, anything high-minded, that comes from Luke and not from Vader?

    The Force is set up as a sort of Zen Buddhist-like dichotomy of those who transcend their feelings and go through ascetic ego-annihilation as Jedi, and those who are allegedly consumed and ruled by their more primal emotions—the “dark side” of hatred, malice, resentment, and so on—but Vader lauds Luke for having control over his emotions and encourages him not to succumb to them, but to channel and make use of them: “Obi-Wan has taught you well. You have controlled your fear. Now, release your anger. Only your hatred can destroy me.”

    Luke is, however, blinded by idealism and naïvety and makes the childish, immature mistake of closing off all avenues to change, all avenues to self-realization: “I’ll never join you!!!” Stirner again[3] [4] has stern things to say: “As long as one knows himself only as spirit, and puts all his value in being spirit (it becomes a light thing for the youth to give his life, his ‘bodily’ life, for nothing, for the silliest point of honor) . . . one has only ideals, unfulfilled ideas or thoughts.”

    Vader, however, is partly defined through something that the prequels got right, a lesson that power matters in the loss of his mother in a brutal, unthinking rape and murder by inferior, subhuman creatures. He is more than a youth, but a man; he is “fond of himself in the flesh, and enjoys him­self just as he is”; he knows the value of bodily life, of temporal life, and temporal power, and is no doubt given to scorn Yoda’s oh-so-sacred, sentimental advice that “you will know [the good from the bad] when you are calm, at peace. Passive. A Jedi uses the Force for knowledge and defense, never for attack.”

    It is Vader’s egoism that makes him a man, “see if he doesn’t seem harder, less noble, more selfish. Is he therefore worse? No, you say, he has only become more certain, or, as you also call it, more ‘practical'” (Stirner). Of what use is Yoda’s advice to Anakin? Sit and be passive, continue your studies; do not want, do not desire, do not live; live only in service of the abstract, bloodless ideal even when you are stained with your mother’s blood; be ascetic and hermetic when you could be active, self-creating, and altogether more selfish.

    It is this adherence to this empty ideal and projected assumption that the Right-wing is enslaved to their emotions that underpins the failure of the prequels. Lucas and his production team simply couldn’t stay true to Vader’s egoist philosophy, nor his appeals to Luke’s self interest and egoism: “Don’t let yourself be destroyed as Obi-Wan did! . . . You do not realize your power . . . Join me, and I will complete your training!”

    Nor could the prequels allow Vader to be a voice of reason against the Red menace, as he originally was: “With our combined strength, we can end this destructive conflict, and bring Order to the galaxy!” Of course, we are supposed to root for Luke and his all-consuming enthusiasm for pacificism and a dislike of particularism, of preference and looking out for oneself. We are supposed to root for this forerunner to Batman who adopts the trappings of fascism and vigilantism, and yet is absolutely shackled to a false morality that undoes him; in a more believable Star Wars, Luke falls to his doom in Empire when he himself plunges to martyrdom.

    Imagine if you will a Star Wars story altogether more gritty and nihilistic, more enthusiastic for realism, and hungry for the red meat of selfish, egoist greatness.

    A young Anakin never meets Padme or any of this wiff-waffling, irrelevant annoyances, and his story starts in his early teens, with his mother’s murder by Sand People. He goes through life experiencing bitter, near-genocidal discrimination on a sand-planet much like contemporary South Africa, and scrapes together the funds to attend a Jedi Summer Camp run by Yoda, who acts as a mentor but cautions constantly against desires (except, of course, for remaining silent on consumerism). As everything Anakin holds dear is trampled underfoot by the rabble in endemic civil war and ethnic conflict between different Sandling tribes, he is compelled by his family loyalties to return home, whereupon he is greeted by a fledgling trade federation—an Empire—who quells the conflict and eagerly recruits him.

    A lifetime of injuries awaits him as he travels from planet to planet through his teens and early twenties, emotionally smoldering from the loss of his simple farm life and family in a genocidal, anti-European colonial struggle. He brings his emotions under an iron grip, and whilst he understands the need to let go of loss and to accept everything as transient and dreamlike as described in the ego-annihilating Jedi philosophy, he is able to devour that idea and take it back into himself, to acknowledge it as valid and yet irrelevant, and as an obstacle to his self-fulfillment.

    Played by the undeniably handsome, expressive, and not-Jewish Hayden Christensen (who left Tinseltown to purchase a farm and start anew), he meets Liam Neeson, but as a friend, not as a foe.

    Reprising the role of Ras Al Ghul, Liam Neeson takes standout soldier and increasingly command-orientated Anakin to Hoth, a desolate, Antarctic wasteland where the National Socialist Trade Empire have stowed their flying saucers. At this point, the progression of Order as desired by the more civilized people of the cosmos is an unquestionable good. The Empire provides protocol, counsel, economic structure, and cracks down hard on the scourge of drugs and open terrorism. Anakin is schooled in Traditionalist knowledge; not merely becoming, like Batman, “an idea,” for an idea is formless and abstract, as Stirner would say “the ghost of right”; but acknowledges the actuality of the Self.

    At the moment of graduation, he and his fellow officers are attacked by a Rogue One band of mercenaries and terrorists. White phosphorous comes streaming out of the sky and the burning ash sears his lungs and face. Seeing his mentor’s incineration at the hands of the Rebel Alliance, Anakin’s respect for the forces of universal tolerance is burnt away. He vows to live for himself, for order, for the greatness of the Empire and self-mastery.

    He becomes an implacable foe of those who are slaves to high-flying theory and fanciful ideals, who will scream bloody murder and napalm humans in the name of destroying those who are “inhumane.” Whereas Lucas’ Anakin was a melodramatic fake, an embarrassment crying over the loss of a girl and baby; as this Vader is placed under the mask of the Samurai, he becomes the Overman—aware of his desires and in full mastery of them, yet stripped of the last vestiges of human weakness and frailty. He becomes the radical of which liberals are terrified, uncompromising and willing to go to any lengths to bring down the reign of mediocrity.

    His offer? Greatness. His promise? Struggle and self-overcoming. Only through sympathy for the Right can one arrive at the real identity of Star Wars’s most heroic character.

     

    Notes

    [1] [5] I have to credit E;R with this phrase.

    [2] [6] Typecasting himself into the same Nice Guy in Space role in Passengers, Guardians of the Galaxy, Infinity War, and the Jurassic World films (which may as well be in space, given that the dinosaurs are alien monsters and Terra Firma so riddled with sci-fi technology that it isn’t the Earth we live on).

    [3] [7] Max Stirner, The Unique and Its Property, translated by Wolfi Landstreicher (Baltimore, Md.: Underworld Amusements, 2017).

    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Hunter / Prey: Pro-White Sci-Fi
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    [1]1,450 words

    Hunter / Prey
    Written & directed by Sandy Collora
    Starring Isaac C. Singleton, Jr. & Damion Poitier
    (2010)

    “I sold my comics to make this movie!” — Sandy Collora

    Hunter / Prey is an independent sci-fi movie from 2010 by producer Sandy Collora. Although Collora is potentially part of the tribe, Hunter / Prey is such a departure from popular sci-fi in the current year that it’s an interesting examination of how the genre can be revived and redirected. With a constraining budget of under half a million dollars, Hunter / Prey is a tightly-scripted, action-focused film that makes the most out of what can be achieved with that small sum — actors running around in costumes in the middle of the desert, with a computer graphics starship to set the thing in motion.

    [2]

    The ship, carrying a dangerous prisoner, is forced to make a crash-landing onto a desert planet that experiences scorching 33-hour days. During the crash, the masked captive makes his escape. The soldiers who pursue him are all dressed in what looks like Power Ranger armor if it had been designed by King Leonidas. Unlike real Spartans, however, these mercenaries are barely competent and argumentative, and so are easily picked off one by one. Nonetheless, they have the edge of possessing superior armor and weaponry, and thus begins a deadly cat-and-mouse game of misdirection and deceit. A rescue ship has been summoned, and the countdown to its arrival keeps the tension high.

    [3]

    With the believability provided by professional actors, costumes produced out of a labor of love, and a plot mercifully free of any politically correct tropes or moralizing, Hunter / Prey is an immersive film that is outright superior to much mainstream cinema. It demonstrates that more really can be less when the audience focus isn’t spread like Marmite over multiple protagonists (for example, Infinity War and The Last Jedi both suffered from an overload of potential leads). Hunter / Prey has eight walking characters plus one disembodied computer voice, and no more than four are present at any one time. As the movie progresses, this is whittled down to two: the handsome and muscular Aryan, Clark Bartram (an American fitness guru and author), and the alien African-American Damon Poitier wearing Blue Man Group face-paint. Poitier stars alongside another alien played by an African-American, Isaac C. Singleton, Jr., so the ethnic breakdown of the cast intentionally matches the fictional species. Besides this, Collora himself stars as one of his own monsters, a bounty hunter with orc ears and plenty of teeth. Between the well-crafted and memorable outfits and clearly inhospitable setting of Mexico, Hunter / Prey creates a racially-charged tale of survival and revenge through its cast and direction alone.

    With such paltry resources to work with, and absent big sets and swathes of extras to establish that this distant planet really is another planet, Hunter / Prey has to rely on expository dialogue to build up the universe and bring further meaning to the violence the actors mete out to each other. Without this, Hunter / Prey would lapse into being a costumed tussle-up. In order to make itself work and to make the actors representative of larger, believable factions in conflict, Hunter / Prey falls back on cinematic tropes that have since been abolished by multicultural cant: the heroic white man enduring and overcoming savagery, and something even more taboo, irreconcilable ethnic conflict. Racial animosity and the threat of might-makes-right genocide is at the heart of this film.

    Collora and his writers take pains to demonstrate the essential difference between the human prisoner and his pursuers: The prisoner mask Bartram is forced to wear has some kind of inhibiting or feeding tube that goes down his throat, and the aliens drink the blood of the resident rodents by impaling them with a tube that feeds into their helmets. Engrossing body horror elements like this and others make the characters of Hunter / Prey believable as individuals acting out part of a galactic conflict.

    We learn early on that the prisoner is “the last of its kind” and that Earth has been snuffed out for the war-crime of harboring refugees of another race. Lieutenant Oran Jericho, bearded and with piercing grey-blue eyes, is on a vengeance mission to return the genocidal favor. When the treasonous Centauri-7 recaptures him, there’s a dialogue of constant taunts and bluffs as “human” (white) and alien try to assert the moral high ground. The audience is explicitly told that Centauri’s race of Sydonians enslaves or destroys all others races it encounters — “if they don’t accept our way of life, then yes!” There is clearly no room for compromise and no separate peace is possible — unlike the cosmopolitan Cantina of Star WarsHunter / Prey offers a species that is not only savage and stupid, but believes itself completely entitled to wipe out entire worlds that don’t assimilate to Dhimmitude. “It is our way!” yells the indignant alien.

    [4]

    All of this may seem a bit much for the safely neutered soyboys of contemporary geekdom. In order to make it palatable to the Hollywood Left and keep himself employed, Collora has the Amazon Alexa that the soldier Centauri-7 carries sound suspiciously like a coy white woman;  it is too humanized to be properly believable, but this is the future, so I guess an artificial intelligence can have an interracial crush now. They had to cram this crap in somewhere, so Damon Poitier ridiculously schemes with her to off his commanding officer, and calls her “Baby” on more than one occasion. However, in a pleasingly sexist kind of way, she is still just an object (a talking box featuring some lights and a computer chip, actually) and so can easily be repossessed by the white man by the end of the film.

    The end of Hunter / Prey leaves a lot to be desired. Having laid its metapolitical cards on the table as a biologically determinist, racial annihilation tale, Collora and crew clearly could not resolve it. Centauri-7 and Oran part ways, presupposed by the film as moral equivalents, even though this idea has already been completely torpedoed by earlier scenes. Centauri-7 is a weak-minded and impulsive simpleton — he flipflops between being a racial loyalist when it comes to blowing up other peoples, and a racial traitor when his resentment towards his superiors gets the better of him. Unlike the original Planet of the Apes, where the “aliens” were explicitly less intellectually-gifted members of the animal kingdom, Hunter / Prey and all other contemporary sci-fi can only go to the point of showing rather than telling the audience about racial differences. Nonetheless, as Sylax the bounty hunter comments, “Nobody likes Sydonians.”

    Despite its loose ends and at times threadbare content, Hunter / Prey is brisk and entertaining. The previous year, 2009, had seen two major films of the multiculturalized box-office sci-fi genre: District 9 and Avatar, both of which were laden with implausible anti-white tropes. Hunter / Prey is a refreshing contrast in its moral seriousness. As a piece of filmmaking, it’s an outstanding accomplishment that makes use of physical props and attempts to achieve captivating results. Collora comments that “there’s something that’s been lost from the brilliant films of the late ’60s and ’70s in contemporary sci-fi and fantasy, and I want to try and bring that back.” For Star Wars fans looking for fare more like the original Star Wars, this is it. Thematically, it returns sci-fi to where it belongs as a genre: produced by, for, and about white men overcoming the dangers of a threatening universe.

    [5]

    It’s a useful reminder that independent filmmaking need not be constrained by either modern speech rules nor fashions, and that even with a modest sum, creative ambition and determination can produce a work to which the culture at large will respond. Clark Bartram’s Batman, in Collora’s previous eight-minute short, Batman: Dead End, brought a new and believable vision of both the Bat and the Joker to Comic-Con (with Batman donning incredibly fascistic leather gloves to beat up a babbling, narcissistic Joker) which translated in a masterfully comic way to the Bigger (auditorium) Screen, and raised the awareness and hype needed to make Hunter / Prey possible as a movie.

    Hunter / Prey itself, whilst not well-known, definitely pulls the zeitgeist away from superhero flummery and towards a harder and more sincere science fiction of the last man standing — more in keeping with the loving fascist pastiche of Starship Troopers than the present day Kosher-Bosher slop served up to “geekdom” audiences. The excellent “Making Of” feature included with it documents the admirable lengths to which the filmmakers went in order to fulfill Sandy’s creative vision. Hunter / Prey shows what can be achieved with ingenuity and dedication, and there is little more inspiring than intrepid heroism and success against the odds.

    ...
    (Review Source)
  • A Profound Waste of Time Avengers: Endgame
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    2,018 words The final installment of the massively profitable Avengers movie franchise, Endgame, offers three hours of superhero soap opera within a coherent, twisting, and surprisingly entertaining plot. Screenwriters Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely remain focused on leading us to a grand climax throughout the story while keeping the edge between wondering what will happen […]
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Avengers: Endgame – Thanocaust Commemoration
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    2,606 words Endgame is an undeniably popular film. Concluding a twenty-two film run of Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) movies featuring home comic book names like Iron Man, Spiderman, Thor, Captain America, the Hulk, and Guardians of the Galaxy, Endgame has the accumulated attention of multiple franchises supporting its monumental box office numbers. It is the […]
    ...
    (Review Source)

Conservative Film Buff2
Letterboxd



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)
  • Avengers: Infinity War

    ★★½ Added

    You know what Avengers: Infinity War is at its heart? It can hardly be classified a movie, as there is not much of a beginning, middle, or end. There is no hero’s journey here with an introduction of characters, conflict, and resolution. Instead, it’s a massive, expensive episode of a television series. More specifically, and bear with me here, it’s a giant episode of Dragon Ball Z. Maybe that’s not a bad thing to you. But that’s what it is.… more

    9 likes

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  • Ant-Man and the Wasp 2018
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Ant-Man and the Wasp

    ★★★½ Added

    Ant-Man and the Wasp is a solid follow-up to the first. Paul Rudd continues to play Paul Rudd, Michael Peña continues to play Michael Peña, and it’s legitimately funny stuff. The first established a level of humor that tops the typical quips of other MCU entries, and actually pushes it into top-tier Marvel. Most films within the MCU attempt to balance a level of general quippy-ness with a level of seriousness that can throw the endeavor into something like farce.… more

    4 likes

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Sonny Bunch2
Free Beacon



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ Review

    BY:

    If Marvel had any guts, they would’ve called this movie Thanos and made it like a straightforward superhero origin story in the mold of Iron Man or Thor or Ant-Man or any of the others. Every emotional beat belongs to Thanos (Josh Brolin), every piece of the action is driven by his effort to complete the Infinity Gauntlet (a glove that allows him to channel the power of the Infinity Stones), every effort in the movie is undertaken to move him one step closer to eliminating half of the universe.

    ...
    (Review Source)
  • ‘Avengers: Endgame’ Review
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    BY:

    Avengers: Endgame is the logical culmination of 11 years and 21 movies, each of which played into the next with post-credit stingers and in-movie Easter Eggs.

    ...
    (Review Source)

Michael Medved1



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Avengers: Infinity War

    Star Rating: 3 Stars
    Cast: Robert Downey Jr., Chris Hemsworth, Mark Ruffalo
    Release Date: Friday, April 27, 2018
    MPAA Rating: PG-13
    Brought to you by www.michaelmedved.com
    ...
    (Review Source)

John Podhoretz3
Commentary Magazine



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Infinity War: Crowded Crossover
    ...
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  • Solo is a Flop—Here's Why.
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    ...
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  • Deadpool 2: Fourth Wall Screwball
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    ...
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The Flyby Podcast1
The Binge



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The Flyby 5/2/18 - Avengers: Infinity War SPOILER REVIEW
    Cranky T-rex and Sarjex give their spoiler filled review of Avengers: Infinity War, along with help from guests Allan Bourdius and Amy Curtis!
    ...
    (Review Source)

Kyle Smith2
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The Most Appalling Films of 2018
    Some of the year’s most anticipated and/or highly praised films turned out to be grotesque abominations.
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Avengers: Endgame Is What We Were Hoping For
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    This might be the most staggering quantity of acting talent and star charisma ever assembled for one movie.
    ...
    (Review Source)

Armond White2
The National Review / OUT



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Infinity War: On the Road to Knowhere
    Marvel trademarks the no-hope genre.
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Avengers: Endgame: Nostalgia for Arrested Adolescents
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Superheroes punch the clock in this hollow, predictable, overly long mess.
    ...
    (Review Source)

Vox Day2
Castalia House



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

⚠️ 𝐄𝐃𝐆𝐘 🔥 𝐂𝐎𝐍𝐓𝐄𝐍𝐓 🔥 𝐖𝐀𝐑𝐍𝐈𝐍𝐆 🔥 (𝐍𝐒𝐅𝐖?) ⚠️

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  • A longtime Marvel fan is very unhappy with the new Marvel blockbuster. Warning, SEVERE spoilers after the fold. Do NOT read this if you do not want to know what happens in the movie. It will ruin it for you, to the extent that is actually possible.

    Loved the Marvel Universe, loved Guardians of the Galaxy and the Avengers, some of the best Sci Fi made IMHO.  Didn’t really like the last Thor movie, thought they mocked and attempted to de empower him, but hey, allowed Thor to exercise his comedy chops, no harm.

    Then came Infinity War.  And I realized the blogs I have been reading are right.  They HATE us.  There is no other explanation for this. 



    You take the Marvel Universe, gather all the heroes together, let the Evil win and kill off half of the galaxy.  Half!  Including half of your hero characters.  Think about a guest director on an episode of any of the Star Trek TV shows; just kill off half of the universe and half of the crew.  Then hand it back to the regular team “ there!  Fixed it for you, all those pesky heroes are gone, no need to thank me”

    I understand sacrificing key characters in support of the story and the narrative; Spock, Groot, Han.  I mourned but I didn’t whinge, in the story line it made sense.  But this movie made no sense and there is no recovering from this unless they do a loopy this-was-just-a-dream/time-warp-fooled-you deus ex machina crap.

    We go to movies for enjoyment, for fun, for escape, and yes, for a little bit of hope.  I have that quote from Second Hand Lions on my wall

    “Sometimes the things that may or may not be true are the things that a man needs to believe in the most: that people are basically good; that honor, courage, and virtue mean everything; that power and money, money and power mean nothing; that good always triumphs over evil; that love, true love, never dies... No matter if they're true or not, a man should believe in those things because those are the things worth believing in.”

    Where was any of this in Infinity War?  Nothing our heroes did made a damn bit of difference.  And whenever they tried to do a noble sacrifice? Magical Bubbles appeared (and more than once). The Hulk?  For no reason every made clear in the previous cannon the Hulk is de empowered and made a figure of fun.  True love?  Let em watch each other die with no gain or reason other than Reasons!  Thor?  Beaten to a pulp and all his people killed including Loki, but Natasha (a human grrl) can beat them back to a standstill?  Iron Man and Dr. Strange?  Let’s have them at each other’s throats.  I am sorry, but it seemed very clear to me all that was happening was the folks at Disney et al were just trying to shit all over a beloved universe and its fans.  And oh guess what?  The Evil was doing it for Climate Change Reasons???  Kill half the galaxy to save the galaxy because humans are a pestilence?  Seriously?

    This wasn’t just a bad movie, this was a deliberate attempt to attack and hurt the fans and their love for this  universe.  I get sacrifice and I get losing characters, I do.  But yah know, I don’t watch Macbeth because of the Everyone Dies routine.  When you take that cheap out way of attempting drama, you end up with no one left to carry the story.  Ah, they can just fill out with more a not a white male remakes and attempt to sell it to an new and different audience.  One that doesn’t love sci fi or superheroes, that will not be paying to watch.  But that appears to be the whole idea, isn’t it?  Take it over and destroy it.  If I stop watching these movies, they win.  If I keep watching these movies, they win.

    Any hope for a Dread Ilk Movie project?

    Actually, it sounds as if George Martin would have benefited heavily from such an approach. And yes, there very likely will be a movie project down the road. But first things first....

    Labels: ,

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    (Review Source)
  • Fight the real battle, Marvel
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Despite its best efforts to anticipate the SJW Narrative, Marvel's Endgame falls well short of the expectations of the SJW thought police:
    The Marvel blockbuster is predicted to surpass its predecessor, Avengers: Infinity War, by £200million, which would crown the new superhero film the largest debut in the history of cinema - and possibly the first film to break one billion dollars in less than a week.

    Endgame's roster includes at least 30 superheroes, but it seems the real battle is more one between the sexes than against gauntlet-wielding super villains - as major male characters enjoy a combined 381 minutes of screen-time, compared to only 116 for their female counterparts.

    Chris Evans' Captain America enjoys one hour and six minutes of screen time - the most of any of the film's stars - followed by Robert Downey Jnr’s Iron Man with one hour and two minutes, and Chris Hemsworth’s Thor with 45 minutes.

    British actress Karen Gillan, known for playing Amy Pond in Doctor Who, has the most screen time of all the female stars, and the fourth most of all, appearing for 41 minutes as the cyborg Nebula, but the franchise's latest star Captain Marvel, played by Brie Larson, appears for only 15 minutes, despite her recent blockbuster.
    I am shocked, appalled, and offended. I expect, and sincerely hope, that Marvel addresses this terrible sexual screen time imbalance in all its future movies. Do they not know it is 2019 and not 1950? Do better, Marvel. Do better!

    Posted by Vox Day.
    ...
    (Review Source)

The Weekly Substandard Podcast1
The Weekly Standard



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The Substandard on Avengers, Baseball, and Buffets

    In this latest mega episode, the Substandard tackles Marvel’s Avengers: Infinity War. JVL reminds his son there’s no crying in baseball. Vic loves a good buffet and Sonny ranks them.

    The Substandard is sponsored by The Black Tux, the easy way for guys to rent suits and tuxedos online. Suits usually retail for $1,200, start at just $95 at The Black Tux! To get $20 off your first purchase, visit TheBlackTux.com/substandard . The Black Tux. Premium rental suits & tuxedos, delivered.

    Subscribe to the Substandard on iTunes,Google Play , or on Stitcher. Join the Substandard community on Facebook and follow on Twitter !

    ...
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Ica Reviews1
Aryan Skynet



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⚠️ 𝐄𝐃𝐆𝐘 🔥 𝐂𝐎𝐍𝐓𝐄𝐍𝐓 🔥 𝐖𝐀𝐑𝐍𝐈𝐍𝐆 🔥 (𝐍𝐒𝐅𝐖?) ⚠️

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  • Recent Movie-Related Items of Interest
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Infinity War

    Over at Counter-Currents, Buttercup Dew reviews “fanboy-specific orgasmatron” Avengers: Infinity War “with unbiased eyes”. At Affirmative Right, meanwhile, culturist John K. Press finds in the same film an “unmistakably Christian” experience, “even if the producers are not fully aware of this” – and Andy Nowicki muses on the significance of Infinity War‘s inclusion of depopulation as a plot element. Robert Stark interviews Norwegian filmmaker Bjorn Erik Sorensen about his upcoming movie Broke on the most recent episode of the Stark Truth podcast. Turning to older movies, John Morgan joins Me Ne Frego for a discussion of A Clockwork Orange and its treatment of the idea of man’s perfectibility. Soiled Sinema‘s Ty E. honors the excellent Cutter’s Way as “the only cinematic work of its era that goes all the way in terms of pure and unadulterated cultural pessimism in regard to the state of the United States and its increasingly disenfranchised white working-class majority.” The estimable Edmund Connelly, writing at The Occidental Observer, reflects on the misunderstood Jewishness of Richard Dreyfuss’s character in the comedy Once Around, and J-F Gariepy and Mr. Z discuss the prescient elements of the futuristic Stallone classic Demolition Man. Finally, at Counter-Currents, Margot Metroland remembers the late Adam Parfrey, who came from a Hollywood family and would become an influential publisher of taboo, transgressive, and conspiracy-related literature at Feral House. Enjoy!

    Rainer Chlodwig von K.

    Rainer is the author of Protocols of the Elders of Zanuck: Psychological Warfare and Filth at the Movies – the DEFINITIVE Alt-Right statement on Hollywood!

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Mark Collett1
This Week On The Alt Right



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  • Black James Bond - Replacing Whites in Films
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Multiculturalists, liberals and social justice warriors are wetting themselves with excitement over the idea of a black James Bond, but the same people go in...
    ...
    (Review Source)

Christian Toto2
Hollywood In Toto



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • ‘Venom’ Brings Superhero Hot Streak to a Halt
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Venom review tom hardy

    When a Marvel movie’s Stan Lee cameo is its highlight you know you’re in trouble.

    “Venom” reimagines the Topher Grace villain from “Spider-Man 3” for a new generation weaned on

    The post ‘Venom’ Brings Superhero Hot Streak to a Halt appeared first on Hollywood in Toto.

    ...
    (Review Source)
  • ‘Avengers: Endgame’ Offers Fans Service on Steroids
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Avengers Endgame review

    It’s the end of an era, and boy does the team behind “Avengers: Endgame” know it.

    The fourth film in the saga and, most certainly, the last in its current

    The post ‘Avengers: Endgame’ Offers Fans Service on Steroids appeared first on Hollywood in Toto.

    ...
    (Review Source)

National Review Staff1
National Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Avengers: Endgame: The Marvel Universe’s Shallow Finale
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    A review of Avengers: Endgame.
    ...
    (Review Source)

Crosswalk2
Cross Walk



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • 5 Things Parents Should Know about Captain Marvel
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Carol Danvers is a superhero with other-wordly superpowers.
    ...
    (Review Source)
  • Spoiler-Free Things Parents Should Know about Avengers: Endgame
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    The only thing worse than reading spoilers for a Marvel movie is taking your children to one and then realizing you should have left them at home.
    ...
    (Review Source)

American Renaissance1
American Renaissance



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • The End of White Celebrity
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)

    Whiteness is a birth defect.

    The post The End of White Celebrity appeared first on American Renaissance.

    ...
    (Review Source)

The Unz Review Staff1
Unz Review



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • As Predicted, AVENGERS: ENDGAME Genocides Whites—Will Franchise (Like America) Survive?, by Paul Kersey
    (”Avengers: Infinity War” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Disney’s Avengers: Endgame, the culmination of 22 prior movies connecting the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU), made an astounding $1.2 billion at the global box office this weekend. [‘Avengers: Endgame’ Sets Global Box Office Record: $1.2 Billion, by Christopher Palmeri, Bloomberg, April 28, 2019] But the plot signals the end of the line for MCU white...
    ...
    (Review Source)

NPI / Radix Journal Staff1
Radix Journal



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

⚠️ EDGY 🔥 CONTENT 🔥 WARNING 🔥 (NSFW?) ⚠️

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    Morgoth1
    Morgoth's Review



    (Reviewers' Site/Bio)

    ⚠️ EDGY 🔥 CONTENT 🔥 WARNING 🔥 (NSFW?) ⚠️

    🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻🔻



      PJ Media Staff1

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