A Charlie Brown Christmas

Not rated yet!
Director
Bill Melendez
Runtime
0 h 25 min
Release Date
9 December 1965
Genres
Animation, Family, Comedy, TV Movie
Overview
When Charlie Brown complains about the overwhelming materialism that he sees amongst everyone during the Christmas season, Lucy suggests that he become director of the school Christmas pageant. Charlie Brown accepts, but is a frustrating struggle. When an attempt to restore the proper spirit with a forlorn little fir Christmas tree fails, he needs Linus' help to learn the meaning of Christmas.
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The Federalist Staff1
The Federalist



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Seven Reasons Elf Is The Perfect Christmas Movie
    (”A Charlie Brown Christmas” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Seven Reasons Elf Is The Perfect Christmas Movie December 22, 2014 By Christian Toto Every year families gather to re-watch Christmas favorites as old as Betty Grable pinups. We know every line from “Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer” (1964), “Miracle on 34th Street” (1947) “It’s a Wonderful Life (1946) and “A Charlie Brown Christmas” (1965). “A Christmas Story” is the new kid on the block, a relative pup at 31 years of age. Then along came “Elf.” The 2003 comedy starring Will Ferrell as Buddy, Santa’s overgrown helper nestled itself next to those Christmas classics. It’s what Hollywood has been trying to do for some time with little success. Consider the flop-sweat stories that once auditioned for the gig: “Christmas with the Kranks.” “Deck the Halls.” “Surviving Christmas.” “Jingle All the Way.” Just try sitting through any of them once, let alone once a year. Tinsel Town loves film franchises, but scoring a new holiday classic is pop culture’s Holy Grail. Comic actor Artie Lange once boasted on “The Howard Stern Show” he gets residual checks for his tiny role in “Elf” given how often it plays each season. Lange’s good fortune is ours, too. “Elf” is a yuletide delight, a near-perfect combination of modern sensibilities and old-fashioned sentiment. Here are seven reasons why “Elf” became a modern Christmas mainstay. A Man-Child Is Born: Will Ferrell’s film resume teems with arrested development types, from “Step Brothers” to “Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby.” There’s even something child-like about Ron Burgundy, our favorite “Anchorman.” “Elf” marked the first time he trotted out that man-child shtick on the big screen, and he nailed it right out of the gate. Santa-Worthy Slapstick: Christmas classics age better than most movies. Slapstick is equally resistant to Father Time – consider the comic legacies of Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. “Elf” combines those two elements with sparkling results. Ferrell gobbles cotton balls, wrestles a fake St. Nick, does a split on an escalator and gets pummeled by an “angry elf” (Peter Dinklage). And, best of all, never has a comedian’s height been put to such grand purpose than Ferrell’s lanky frame clad in yellow tights. Shower Time with Buddy: Ferrell’s accidental bathroom duet with co-star Zooey Deschanel isn’t naughty but oh, so nice. The pair sing the courtship classic “Baby, It’s Cold Outside,” the first chapter in the couple’s unlikely romance. Deschanel, a recording artist away from the big screen, serves up a delicate take on the song. Ferrell’s tentative verses reveal Buddy’s lovable naivety. An Elf Out of Water: Some comic staples never grow old. Consider the “fish out of water” template, used so brilliantly in “Crocodile Dundee.” In “Elf,” we watch Buddy giggling his way through a shoe shine, chewing gum left behind on a subway fence, spinning a revolving door like a top and otherwise behaving like he’s never stepped foot in a city like New York. He hasn’t, and his sense of discovery is magical. James Caan Channels Charles Dickens: Veteran actor James Caan plays Buddy’ father, a publishing executive with little patience for holiday mischief. He’s Ebenezer Scrooge and Bob Cratchit rolled into one, with a pinch of the Grinch for good measure. When Buddy finally captures daddy’s heart it links back to Dickens’ yuletide awakening. No Sequel, No Problem: “Elf” is 11 years old, and there’s not so much as a rumor about a sequel, reboot or re-imagining despite the film’s cult status. Ferrell has gone on record saying a sequel doesn’t interest him, a rare sign of artistic restraint in an industry starved for hits. No matter how good it might be to see Buddy and friends again, any new “Elf” project would diminish the original. Tip of the Elf Hat to the Classics: Few knew back in 2003 “Elf” would one day join the likes of “A Christmas Story” and other yuletide staples. The movie wisely acknowledged the tall task before it all the same. Consider the animated sequences honoring “Rudolph,” with a stop-motion snowman standing in for Burl Ives. It’s one of several sly odes to previous Christmas fare. Someday, we may see a future holiday film name-check Buddy and friends. Christian Toto is an award-winning journalist, film critic and fatherhood blogger. You can find more here. Photo Elf A Charlie Brown Christmas Anchorman Artie Lange Betty Grable Buster Keaton Charlie Chaplin Editors Picks Peter Dinklage Rudolph Will Ferrell Zooey Deschanel Copyright © 2017 The Federalist, a wholly independent division of FDRLST Media, All Rights Reserved. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1463670073398-2'); }); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({mode:'thumbs-2r', container:'taboola-below-main-column-mix', placement:'below-main-column', target_type:'mix'}); window._taboola = window._taboola || []; _taboola.push({flush:true}); 0 Comments /* * * CONFIGURATION VARIABLES: EDIT BEFORE PASTING INTO YOUR WEBPAGE * * */ var disqus_shortname = 'thefederalist23'; // required: replace example with your forum shortname /* * * DON'T EDIT BELOW THIS LINE * * */ (function() { var dsq = document.createElement('script'); dsq.type = 'text/javascript'; dsq.async = true; dsq.src = '//' + disqus_shortname + '.disqus.com/embed.js'; (document.getElementsByTagName('head')[0] || document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0]).appendChild(dsq); })(); Please enable JavaScript to view the comments powered by Disqus. comments powered by Disqus ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

Crosswalk1
Cross Walk



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Five Christmas Movies to Watch
    (”A Charlie Brown Christmas” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Movies This particular blog will be short and sweet. At Christmas time you are going to watch Christmas movies, so be sure to watch the right ones. Meaning, ones that honor Christmas and talk about Jesus in the way He deserves. So while Elf is great… as are Miracle on 34th Street, Frosty the Snowman, and my personal favorite Christmas movie, Die Hard, ... there’s no Jesus anywhere in them. Well, the word “Jesus” comes up a lot in Die Hard, just not in the way I need my grandchildren to hear. googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-1'); }); So here are five great movies to watch that, if you are not already aware of, will mean this blog has served its purpose: It’s A Wonderful Life This movie really does capture the Christian Christmas spirit and includes many spiritual and biblical references. A Christmas Carol And specifically the one starring George C. Scott. I feel this version is best because it is authentic to the Dickens original, which is deeply Christian. Jesus of Nazareth Directed by Franco Zeffirelli and released in 1977, this film has a wonderful and biblical representation of the Christmas story. While you can see this in the first 30-40 minutes of it, I recommend watching till the end. The Homecoming This film is what started the Waltons series, which I didn’t particularly follow, but the tele-movie was classic and very deep in its Christian background story. A Charlie Brown Christmas Surprisingly, this is the most blatantly Christian Christmas special ever. Enjoy. James Emery White   About the Author googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-2'); }); if (gptClientWidth >= 992 && gptClientWidth <= 1000000) googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('gpt-ad-3'); }); James Emery White is the founding and senior pastor of Mecklenburg Community Church in Charlotte, NC, and the ranked adjunctive professor of theology and culture at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, where he also served as their fourth president. His forthcoming book, Meet Generation Z: Understanding and Reaching the New Post-Christian Culture, is available for pre-order on Amazon. To enjoy a free subscription to the Church and Culture blog, visit ChurchAndCulture.org, where you can view past blogs in our archive and read the latest church and culture news from around the world. Follow Dr. White on twitter @JamesEmeryWhite.  ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

PJ Media Staff1
PJ Media



(Reviewers' Site/Bio)

  • Essential Christmas: The 10 Best Holiday Specials and Movies
    (”A Charlie Brown Christmas” is briefly mentioned in this.)
    Lifestyle In a day when parents and children rarely watch the same TV shows, Christmas TV specials and holiday movies still somehow manage to continue to bring families together.These days it's even easier than it used to be to share these traditions. ABC Family has made an art out of holiday programming with their "25 Days of Christmas" programming blocs that package specials throughout the month of December. Home video and streaming services also allow families to watch programs whenever they want.In the spirit of Christmas, I'm offering to you this list of the ten most essential specials and movies of the season.We'll start with a pair of very different types of animation from a production company synonymous with Christmas specials...10. The Year Without a Santa ClausArthur Rankin and Jules Bass are synonymous with their stop-motion Christmas specials of the ‘60s and ‘70s. Viewers not familiar with their names will recognize their unmistakable round-headed characters, candy-colored landscapes, and softly falling snow. A few of their specials are on this list, starting with The Year Without a Santa Claus.In this 1974 special, Mrs. Claus (voiced by Shirley Booth) tells the story of the year Santa (voiced by Mickey Rooney) decides -- on doctor's orders -- to take a vacation. Two of his elves and the young reindeer Vixen take a trip to find enough Christmas spirit to cheer Santa up. Along their way, the elves battle the Heat Miser and Snow Miser and visit Southtown, USA, where they get lost. Santa journeys south to find Vixen and discovers that the children of the world need him. He can't skip Christmas.The Year Without a Santa Claus is a clever story with some memorable scenes and catchy songs, including those involving the villains.It’s not as ubiquitous as Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer or Santa Claus Is Coming to Town, but The Year Without a Santa Claus is trippy holiday fun.9. Frosty the SnowmanAnother Christmas special that has stood the test of time is Frosty the Snowman. Originally aired in 1969, Frosty vaguely follows the story line of the popular Christmas song. The special tells how the kids who built Frosty help him escape to the North Pole while trying to elude the magician whose hat brought him to life.The special is a Rankin/Bass production but it’s a traditional cartoon, not the company's signature stop-motion. Rankin and Bass hired a Japanese company to animate the show and it has a decidedly different look from most animation of the period. Jimmy Durante provides the narration and performs the title song.Looking back the animation in Frosty is poor and the special as a whole is a bit cheesy but it's still nostalgic Christmas fun.Next up is a movie about one boy's quest for a special Christmas gift. Don't poke your eye out! class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2011/12/19/essential-christmas/ previous Page 1 of 9 next   ]]>
    ...
    (Review Source)

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